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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with
the squeeze to fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for
it, but I do have lots of black ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so
I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke
up, or might it be OK long term?

--
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk
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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

On Mon, 03 Aug 2015 18:03:52 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with
the squeeze to fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for
it, but I do have lots of black ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so
I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke
up, or might it be OK long term?


Judging by the way it stained everything when I was into refilling
inkjet carts, it may be less washable than the Quink so-called
washable variety which was more or less compulsory when I was at
school.
Don't let the XYL catch you using it in her best room.



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Graham.

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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?


"Harry Bloomfield" wrote in message
. uk...
I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with the squeeze to
fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for it, but I do have lots of black
ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke up, or might it be
OK long term?


As you've had no problems in making it flow, and given ink that can
go through a printer head should present no problems to a nib,
possibly all the caveats on here -

its too thin - basically the delivery machanism is so different
that it simply wouldn't flow [ although it seemms it does }-
but would instead clog.

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/fo...-fountain-pen/

are all mistaken. Dunno.

Given that you've just found it and are maybe using it out of
novelty for occasional use, maybe if you flushed it out after
every use this might prevent any lasting damage.

Otherwise Quink is still available from Rymans at 6.99 a pop
- 60ml for both blue and black both permanent and "new improved"
water soluble. Although they seem to have changed the label
as well.


michael adams

....







--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk



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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

On 03/08/2015 18:03, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with
the squeeze to fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for
it, but I do have lots of black ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so
I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke up,
or might it be OK long term?


Impossible to say in advance, without knowing the chemistry of the ink.

Some inkjet inks are water based, which should not be a problem. Some
are oil based, which may not be compatible with the bladder.

The colour may, in common with most fountain pen inks, be a dye or it
may be a pigment, which can clog pens. The price may be a guide, as
pigmented ink is more expensive than dye based ink.

--
Colin Bignell
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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

Nightjar cpb has brought this to us :
On 03/08/2015 18:03, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with
the squeeze to fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for
it, but I do have lots of black ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so
I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke up,
or might it be OK long term?


Impossible to say in advance, without knowing the chemistry of the ink.

Some inkjet inks are water based, which should not be a problem. Some are oil
based, which may not be compatible with the bladder.

The colour may, in common with most fountain pen inks, be a dye or it may be
a pigment, which can clog pens. The price may be a guide, as pigmented ink is
more expensive than dye based ink.


Thanks, it seems to be water based - I can smudge it with a wet finger
and it was just a cheap refill, bought years ago, when I used inkjets..

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

On 03/08/2015 18:47, michael adams wrote:

Otherwise Quink is still available from Rymans at 6.99 a pop
- 60ml for both blue and black both permanent and "new improved"
water soluble. Although they seem to have changed the label
as well.


Even cheaper from Ebuyer. Oh, I see turquoise* is still available in
some places too...

*I went to the type of school that mandated the use of a "fountain pen",
but didn't mandate the colour of ink. Little victories
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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

michael adams wrote:
"Harry Bloomfield" wrote in message
. uk...
I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with the squeeze to
fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for it, but I do have lots of black
ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke up, or might it be
OK long term?


As you've had no problems in making it flow, and given ink that can
go through a printer head should present no problems to a nib,
possibly all the caveats on here -

its too thin - basically the delivery machanism is so different
that it simply wouldn't flow [ although it seemms it does }-
but would instead clog.

http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/fo...-fountain-pen/

are all mistaken. Dunno.

Given that you've just found it and are maybe using it out of
novelty for occasional use, maybe if you flushed it out after
every use this might prevent any lasting damage.

Otherwise Quink is still available from Rymans at 6.99 a pop
- 60ml for both blue and black both permanent and "new improved"
water soluble. Although they seem to have changed the label
as well.


michael adams

...







--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk



As an aside I started using an American ink that Noodles make which
reacts with the cellulose in paper making it archival,(virtually
waterproof)because I had a notebook which got damp, the ink bled and was
unreadable and I lost valuable records..
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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?


"Lee" wrote in message ...
On 03/08/2015 18:47, michael adams wrote:

Otherwise Quink is still available from Rymans at 6.99 a pop
- 60ml for both blue and black both permanent and "new improved"
water soluble. Although they seem to have changed the label
as well.


Even cheaper from Ebuyer.



Indeed, having checked its only 5.49 on Amazon P&P. and it
does look like a glass bottle as well. I'd be very wary of buying
ink by mail order myself, for the mess it could make. Never mind
the ag of actually getting the money back, sending photos
of the mess etc. Apart from click and collect (up to 5 -7 days )
Rymans do actually stock a lot of this legacy stuff in their stores
although finding it can be a different matter. Sickening though
it is, to have pay one penny more than is absolutely necessary.


Oh, I see turquoise* is still available in some places too...

*I went to the type of school that mandated the use of a "fountain pen", but didn't
mandate the colour of ink. Little victories


The school tie also offered a lot of scope for improvisation
as well ISTR. You could get interesting effects by tying the knot
as near to the short or the wide end as possible. Not me though,
I was always a bit of a scruff myself.

I was just wondering about the waterproof/permanent thing.
I'm sure that in my day there wasn't a choice just Quink
or Stephens in one or two, or maybe three colours. But then,
as you could buy it from the local newsagents, maybe they
only stocked the one sort.


michael adams

....


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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?


"F Murtz" wrote in message
eb.com...

As an aside I started using an American ink that Noodles make which reacts with the
cellulose in paper making it archival,(virtually waterproof)because I had a notebook
which got damp, the ink bled and was unreadable and I lost valuable records..


A lot probably depends on how long you want to keep stuff for.
Since the introduction of wood pulp paper in the 1850's and
the need for acid, there's no doubt that paper from that
era is now brittle and falling apart. However this is a
process that may take 100 years. And while the paper
in books printed during WW2 has a distinct "East German"
look to it - rough, brown specks - and is browning a bit, its
still holding up after 70 years. So whether its worth forking
out extra for archival acid free paper or not depends on
circumstances
As to inks I'd imagine their biggest enemy is sunlight
or UV generally. And that any notebook kept closed in a boxfile
or drawer for most of its life should stay legible for
centuries. Assuming the paper hasn't crumbled away in
the meantime, that is.


michael adams

....


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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?


"michael adams" wrote in message
...

"F Murtz" wrote in message
eb.com...

As an aside I started using an American ink that Noodles make which reacts with the
cellulose in paper making it archival,(virtually waterproof)because I had a notebook
which got damp, the ink bled and was unreadable and I lost valuable records..


Sorry I totally misread this. It was "after" the notebook got damp
and the ink bled, that you subsequently bought the archival ink. The
problem being presumably that many other waterproof inks are also
prone to clogging.




A lot probably depends on how long you want to keep stuff for.
Since the introduction of wood pulp paper in the 1850's and
the need for acid, there's no doubt that paper from that
era is now brittle and falling apart. However this is a
process that may take 100 years. And while the paper
in books printed during WW2 has a distinct "East German"
look to it - rough, brown specks - and is browning a bit, its
still holding up after 70 years. So whether its worth forking
out extra for archival acid free paper or not depends on
circumstances
As to inks I'd imagine their biggest enemy is sunlight
or UV generally. And that any notebook kept closed in a boxfile
or drawer for most of its life should stay legible for
centuries. Assuming the paper hasn't crumbled away in
the meantime, that is.


michael adams

...





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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

michael adams wrote:
"F Murtz" wrote in message
eb.com...

As an aside I started using an American ink that Noodles make which reacts with the
cellulose in paper making it archival,(virtually waterproof)because I had a notebook
which got damp, the ink bled and was unreadable and I lost valuable records..


A lot probably depends on how long you want to keep stuff for.
Since the introduction of wood pulp paper in the 1850's and
the need for acid, there's no doubt that paper from that
era is now brittle and falling apart. However this is a
process that may take 100 years. And while the paper
in books printed during WW2 has a distinct "East German"
look to it - rough, brown specks - and is browning a bit, its
still holding up after 70 years. So whether its worth forking
out extra for archival acid free paper or not depends on
circumstances
As to inks I'd imagine their biggest enemy is sunlight
or UV generally. And that any notebook kept closed in a boxfile
or drawer for most of its life should stay legible for
centuries. Assuming the paper hasn't crumbled away in
the meantime, that is.


michael adams

...


And water.
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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?


"Tim Streater" wrote in message
.. .
In article , michael adams
wrote:

"F Murtz" wrote in message
aweb.com...

As an aside I started using an American ink that Noodles make which reacts
with the cellulose in paper making it archival,(virtually waterproof)because I had a
notebook which got damp, the ink bled and was unreadable and I lost valuable
records..


A lot probably depends on how long you want to keep stuff for.
Since the introduction of wood pulp paper in the 1850's and
the need for acid, there's no doubt that paper from that
era is now brittle and falling apart. However this is a
process that may take 100 years. And while the paper
in books printed during WW2 has a distinct "East German"
look to it - rough, brown specks - and is browning a bit, its
still holding up after 70 years.


Is the browning due to the paper oxidising (and so presumably a process
that could continue until you're left with ash) or is it a chemical
process with the acid meaning it'll brown up to a point and be stable
thereafter.


Not sure about the cause - apart from the acid attacking the cellulose but its
certainly never stable. It becomes increasing brittle rather than flexible and
can be easily torn . The folds in each sheet where the book is bound are also
stressed and the pages start to fall out. Acidity is irreversible the best that
can be achieved is for the process to be halted and the material
treated with kid gloves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow_fires


michael adams

....


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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

On 03/08/2015 21:57, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
Nightjar cpb has brought this to us :
On 03/08/2015 18:03, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
I have just found a decades old, never used Parker fountain pen, with
the squeeze to fill type bladder system. Of course I don't have ink for
it, but I do have lots of black ink refill kits for inkjet printers, so
I tried that and it seems to work OK.

Any comments welcome please. Will the bladder dissolve the nib choke up,
or might it be OK long term?


Impossible to say in advance, without knowing the chemistry of the ink.

Some inkjet inks are water based, which should not be a problem. Some
are oil based, which may not be compatible with the bladder.

The colour may, in common with most fountain pen inks, be a dye or it
may be a pigment, which can clog pens. The price may be a guide, as
pigmented ink is more expensive than dye based ink.


Thanks, it seems to be water based - I can smudge it with a wet finger
and it was just a cheap refill, bought years ago, when I used inkjets..


It is interesting to contrast the "colour fastness", or rather lack of
after a number of years, of a print from a horse show photographer,
(presumably inkjet) with adjacent and contemporary prints from my Canon
Selphy dye-sub printer.
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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

On Tue, 04 Aug 2015 23:02:05 +0100, newshound wrote:

It is interesting to contrast the "colour fastness", or rather lack of
after a number of years, of a print from a horse show photographer,
(presumably inkjet) with adjacent and contemporary prints from my Canon
Selphy dye-sub printer.


When inkjets where new things 20 years ago the office got one.
Printed out the technical requirements for an Outside Broadcast, it
rained, ended up with completely blank sheets of paper!

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Default Inkjet ink v faountain pen ink?

Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Tue, 04 Aug 2015 23:02:05 +0100, newshound wrote:

It is interesting to contrast the "colour fastness", or rather lack of
after a number of years, of a print from a horse show photographer,
(presumably inkjet) with adjacent and contemporary prints from my Canon
Selphy dye-sub printer.


When inkjets where new things 20 years ago the office got one.
Printed out the technical requirements for an Outside Broadcast, it
rained, ended up with completely blank sheets of paper!

Totally different now,you can get archival inks even edible inks,for inkjet.
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