Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old April 25th 04, 07:32 PM
Too_Many_Tools
 
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Default Adjustable Shop/Die Table

I am currently designing an adjustable shop/die table for use around
the mill and lathe area of the shop.

It will be used to move chucks, vises, rotary tables and such to and
from the machines. It also may be drafted for service when I wish to
move other heavier items around like my surface plate when the need
arises.

One of the questions I have is "How big should I make the table
surface?"

The bigger the table the more awkward it is to use in a crowded shop
environment but the larger table surface, the larger the item it could
move. Any suggestions for a convenient size? I am thinking a good
guess for a table size would be one sized for tooling and accessories
common to a Bridgeport mill and a 12"-14" engine lathe. If so, then
what would this be?

I am also designing in a detachable boom so the table can be used as a
small crane to reach items higher than its table top can reach. It
will be designed so it stores under the mill or lathe when it is
lowered to its lowest height. It will have stops on the casters so the
table doesn't decide to move on its own at an inconvenient moment. I
could also see where a table top that could rotate would be useful.

Any suggestions anyone can offer in on the subject of adjustable shop
furniture would be appreciated since the next project is a adjustable
height welding table.

TIA

TMT

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Old April 25th 04, 08:24 PM
Machineman
 
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Default Adjustable Shop/Die Table

take a look at these for some ideas
http://www2.northerntool.com/category/1541/
We had a couple of lift tables for vises etc before we got some overhead
cranes installed, I think they just sit in the corner now and just get
used as a table :-) Ours were a straight hydralic lift, not the
scissors type.

Too_Many_Tools wrote:

I am currently designing an adjustable shop/die table for use around
the mill and lathe area of the shop.

It will be used to move chucks, vises, rotary tables and such to and
from the machines. It also may be drafted for service when I wish to
move other heavier items around like my surface plate when the need
arises.

One of the questions I have is "How big should I make the table
surface?"

The bigger the table the more awkward it is to use in a crowded shop
environment but the larger table surface, the larger the item it could
move. Any suggestions for a convenient size? I am thinking a good
guess for a table size would be one sized for tooling and accessories
common to a Bridgeport mill and a 12"-14" engine lathe. If so, then
what would this be?

I am also designing in a detachable boom so the table can be used as a
small crane to reach items higher than its table top can reach. It
will be designed so it stores under the mill or lathe when it is
lowered to its lowest height. It will have stops on the casters so the
table doesn't decide to move on its own at an inconvenient moment. I
could also see where a table top that could rotate would be useful.

Any suggestions anyone can offer in on the subject of adjustable shop
furniture would be appreciated since the next project is a adjustable
height welding table.

TIA

TMT


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Old April 25th 04, 11:53 PM
Stephen
 
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Default Adjustable Shop/Die Table


"Too_Many_Tools" wrote in message
om...
I am currently designing an adjustable shop/die table for use around
the mill and lathe area of the shop.

A related thought. I have also been thinking about making an adjustable
table so that when I work on larger parts I can get them at a convenient
height. I would also like a way to be able to move and rotate the part on
the table. Roller balls could work but the part could (probably would) roll
off the table and onto my foot. I was thinking about drilling several small
holes through the tabletop and hooking them up to compressed air. Turn on
the air and the part would float on a thin cushion of air, turn off the air
and the part would drop down on the table. Has any one tried or seen
something like this? It probably isn't a unique idea, I may have seen
something like it. I have seen a similar method used to move heavy
equipment, a plate with holes on the bottom was placed under each corner of
the equipment and compressed air was applied. The plates moved up a fraction
of an inch and the equipment could be moved with almost no friction.

Scp

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Old April 26th 04, 12:16 AM
Bob Engelhardt
 
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Default Adjustable Shop/Die Table

Too_Many_Tools wrote:
...
I am also designing in a detachable boom ...


You'll have to be real careful here to keep the table from tipping
over. The boom is going to be like a lever on the table. The
combination of boom length and load can't exceed the combination of the
weight and size of the table. The exact calculation depends upon the
geometry of the table and boom. Bob
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Old April 26th 04, 01:11 AM
Peter T. Keillor III
 
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Default Adjustable Shop/Die Table

On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 19:16:09 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
wrote:

Too_Many_Tools wrote:
...
I am also designing in a detachable boom ...


You'll have to be real careful here to keep the table from tipping
over. The boom is going to be like a lever on the table. The
combination of boom length and load can't exceed the combination of the
weight and size of the table. The exact calculation depends upon the
geometry of the table and boom. Bob


What he said. Combining disparate functions in one device often leads
to doing no function well, the car-boat, car-plane, motor-sailer, and
swiss army knife come to mind. You might be better served by one of
those fold-up engine hoists and the table. (I didn't bring up
3-in-1's for fear of The Wrath of Ted).

Pete Keillor


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Old April 26th 04, 04:03 PM
Too_Many_Tools
 
Posts: n/a
Default Adjustable Shop/Die Table

The point about the danger of an over extended boom is well taken.

The base of this table will be built like a scaled down stacker
similar to this example...

http://www.chdist.com/ecommerce/eCom...06&parent_id=0

I am considering making the lift such that the table or boom can be
implemented separately, in other words the table or boom can be
removed and the other attachment inserted. The boom would extend only
slightly beyond the center point of the lift. While that would limit
its reach, it would insure stability.

It also occurred to me that one can weight the bottom of the cart down
(I happen to have a concrete slab of the right size looking for a
home) to help stabilze the cart.

Keep the comments and suggestions coming folks. These ideas apply to
alot of shop furniture that we all use.

TMT



Peter T. Keillor III wrote in message . ..
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 19:16:09 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
wrote:

Too_Many_Tools wrote:
...
I am also designing in a detachable boom ...


You'll have to be real careful here to keep the table from tipping
over. The boom is going to be like a lever on the table. The
combination of boom length and load can't exceed the combination of the
weight and size of the table. The exact calculation depends upon the
geometry of the table and boom. Bob


What he said. Combining disparate functions in one device often leads
to doing no function well, the car-boat, car-plane, motor-sailer, and
swiss army knife come to mind. You might be better served by one of
those fold-up engine hoists and the table. (I didn't bring up
3-in-1's for fear of The Wrath of Ted).

Pete Keillor



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