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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.

QUESTION 1: hints and tricks on (safely) unscrewing the
things -- including the small 2or3-inch-across ones too.

And, what about the rubber press-on (causing vacuum seal)
kits like they sell at HD? Do they actually work?
QUESTION 2: might it be a question of the *quality* of
the socket (material)? (Ours came from HD!)

Do these things come in different quality, different
materials? (Aluminum vs aluminum-coated-with-something vs
maybe copper?)

QUESTION3: short of that (could be expensive?, difficult
to do?), is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?


Thanks!

David


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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

David Combs wrote:

In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.

QUESTION 1: hints and tricks on (safely) unscrewing the
things -- including the small 2or3-inch-across ones too.

And, what about the rubber press-on (causing vacuum seal)
kits like they sell at HD? Do they actually work?
QUESTION 2: might it be a question of the *quality* of
the socket (material)? (Ours came from HD!)

Do these things come in different quality, different
materials? (Aluminum vs aluminum-coated-with-something vs
maybe copper?)

QUESTION3: short of that (could be expensive?, difficult
to do?), is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?


Thanks!

David




I just use squalene ("nose oil").

Rubbing the threaded part of the bulb against the side of your nose will
transfer enough squalene to it to prevent it galling and sticking.

The same stuff works pretty well to ease dry chapped lips in the
wintertime. just rub a fingertip on the side of your nose and tramsfer
the oil to your lips.

Honest.

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
The speed of light is 1.8*10^12 furlongs per fortnight.

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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

Jeff Wisnia wrote in
:

David Combs wrote:

In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.

QUESTION 1: hints and tricks on (safely) unscrewing the
things -- including the small 2or3-inch-across ones too.

And, what about the rubber press-on (causing vacuum seal)
kits like they sell at HD? Do they actually work?
QUESTION 2: might it be a question of the *quality* of
the socket (material)? (Ours came from HD!)

Do these things come in different quality, different
materials? (Aluminum vs aluminum-coated-with-something vs
maybe copper?)

QUESTION3: short of that (could be expensive?, difficult
to do?), is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?


Thanks!

David




I just use squalene ("nose oil").

Rubbing the threaded part of the bulb against the side of your nose
will transfer enough squalene to it to prevent it galling and
sticking.

The same stuff works pretty well to ease dry chapped lips in the
wintertime. just rub a fingertip on the side of your nose and tramsfer
the oil to your lips.

Honest.

Jeff



I can just picture this suggestion getting propagated through the
Internet to friend of a friend of my dead uncle told me, etc. One day,
in through the door at the ER comes someone with a bulb screwed in their
Ted Kennedy Red nose.
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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe


"David Combs" wrote in message
...
In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.

QUESTION 1: hints and tricks on (safely) unscrewing the
things -- including the small 2or3-inch-across ones too.

And, what about the rubber press-on (causing vacuum seal)
kits like they sell at HD? Do they actually work?
QUESTION 2: might it be a question of the *quality* of
the socket (material)? (Ours came from HD!)

Do these things come in different quality, different
materials? (Aluminum vs aluminum-coated-with-something vs
maybe copper?)

QUESTION3: short of that (could be expensive?, difficult
to do?), is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?


Thanks!

David


There is actually a bulb thread lubricating grease. Any home improvement
store - small tube in a blister pack - easy to miss - ask.




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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

David Combs posted for all of us...

, is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?

Bulb grease by Devcon sold at Sears Hardware.
--
Tekkie Don't bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.
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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

Try a cheap anti-seize and lubricating compound that you can purchase
at any home improvement store. It most likely will be a graphite /
copper / aluminum blend. A very thin coating on the threads and you're
good to go.

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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe


Best to use lamps that match the base aluminium and aluminium brass to
brass


David Combs wrote:

In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.

QUESTION 1: hints and tricks on (safely) unscrewing the
things -- including the small 2or3-inch-across ones too.

And, what about the rubber press-on (causing vacuum seal)
kits like they sell at HD? Do they actually work?
QUESTION 2: might it be a question of the quality of
the socket (material)? (Ours came from HD!)

Do these things come in different quality, different
materials? (aluminium vs aluminium-coated-with-something vs
maybe copper?)

QUESTION3: short of that (could be expensive?, difficult
to do?), is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?


Thanks!

David

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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.
CY: I hear yah.

QUESTION 1: hints and tricks on (safely) unscrewing the
things -- including the small 2or3-inch-across ones too.
CY: Wear rubber glove. They are more grippy.

And, what about the rubber press-on (causing vacuum seal)
kits like they sell at HD? Do they actually work?
CY: Dunno.

QUESTION 2: might it be a question of the *quality* of
the socket (material)? (Ours came from HD!)
CY: Like dentists who push high fluoride tooth paste on their
victi////patients?

Do these things come in different quality, different
materials? (Aluminum vs aluminum-coated-with-something vs
maybe copper?)
CY: I'm sure they do.

QUESTION3: short of that (could be expensive?, difficult
to do?), is there some kind of a (conducting, of course)
lubricant than can sprayed or rubbed onto either the
socket inner-surface or the bulb screw?
CY: You don't want a conducting lubricant. It will tend to short out
the fixture. I'd try old fashioned axle grease. High temp lith maybe.




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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

David Combs wrote:
In these sunken-into-the-ceiling "cans" into which
you screw-in light-bulbs (not much grip-room around
the sides), a (burnt-out) (indoor flood) can be darn near
*impossible* to unscrew, at least without breaking the bulb.



http://www.lampsplus.com/products/s_...?lpqsv_cid=114

I posted the preventative product I've used with success for the last couple of
years in another thread. $4 will buy you enough to probably last you the rest
of your life. Great stuff!

I've used those rubber suction cup things I bought at HD to unscrew stuck bulbs
with mixed success. I've also ended up having to dig out the remnants of bulbs
with a pair of needle nose pliers.

However, I am confident if you apply this lube to the threads of your light
bulbs, you won't have to dig out another bulb. I sure as hell haven't.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com




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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe


Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:
David Combs wrote:

I've used those rubber suction cup things I bought at HD to unscrew stuck bulbs
with mixed success. I've also ended up having to dig out the remnants of bulbs
with a pair of needle nose pliers.

However, I am confident if you apply this lube to the threads of your light
bulbs, you won't have to dig out another bulb. I sure as hell haven't.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Then there is the "Break the glass and try to twist out the remains of
the jagged glass and the base of the bulb with a potato.

Oh. BTW make sure the fixture is 'off' before doing this and discard
the spud. (Glass in teeth etc.)

If this fails needle nose pliers and patience. But have also tried the
end of wooden dowel of a suitable diameter to jam fit into the now
glass shattered broken lamp base.

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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe

THANKS FOR ALL THE HINTS, GUYS!

REALLY GREAT!

David


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Default *avoiding* future stuck light-bulbs? Lubricant-spray, maybe


terry wrote:
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Then there is the "Break the glass and try to twist out the remains of
the jagged glass and the base of the bulb with a potato.

I usually catch hell for this suggestion, but if you try it you'll find
it works very well. Instead of a potato, use another bulb. Firmly
press the base of the bulb into the broken off base and carefully
unscrew. It works because of the amount of surface contact between the
two. And no, I've never had a bulb break in my hand. Been doing it
for years and very rarely have to resort to needlenose pliers anymore.
Bob

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