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Default Shed doors


I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?
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On Wed, 19 May 2021 08:17:36 -0400, knuttle
wrote:


I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?



Maybe I'm dense .. I read your post 3 times and
I can't understand your description of the problem ..
Can you post a photo on imgur or something ?
John T.

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Default Shed doors

knuttle writes:

I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?


Don't use particle board where it will be exposed to moisture?

I'm not sure the glue will be particularly effective, but a coat
of paint may delay further decomposition of the door.

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Default Shed doors

(Scott Lurndal) on Wed, 19 May 2021 13:54:25 GMT
typed in rec.woodworking the following:
knuttle writes:

I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?


Don't use particle board where it will be exposed to moisture?

I'm not sure the glue will be particularly effective, but a coat
of paint may delay further decomposition of the door.


I would suspect that you'd want the remaining board to be bone dry
when you paint it. You don't want to trap the water inside the board.

And if you are not picky about color, Sherwin-Williams (etc) often
have "mistints" for sale cheap.
--
pyotr filipivich
This Week's Panel: Us & Them - Eliminating Them.
Next Month's Panel: Having eliminated the old Them(tm)
Selecting who insufficiently Woke(tm) as to serve as the new Them(tm)
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Default Shed doors

On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 8:18:03 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?


"standard particle board siding"

What do you mean by "standard particle board siding". There are numerous
materials that people refer to as "particle board", often incorrectly.

When I hear particle board, I think of the material used to make flat-pack
furniture, like inexpensive nightstands and bookcases. Melamine comes to
mind also. That would not be considered "standard particle board siding"
and shouldn't be used outside.

"That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part"

Do you perhaps mean that the OSB (?) on the interior bottom of the door is
beginning to look like this?

https://i.imgur.com/IiWwtiz.jpg

If so, I've never heard of regluing OSB. There are epoxies that are used to
stop rot and "rebuild" rotten wood, like window sills and thresholds.
Maybe that would work.

Perhaps you could spread epoxy over (and into) the area and then
clamp it to get it back to "flat". Using wax paper between the epoxy
and the boards used to make the clamping form will prevent the
form from sticking to the OSB (or whatever the actual material is).

Another option might be to cut off the damaged area and attach
a new "bottom" perhaps using pocket screws or a backer board
on the inside. Yes, there would be a seam that would need to be
sealed, but without more info (and perhaps a picture) it's tough to
offer specific solutions.




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Default Shed doors

"knuttle" wrote in message ...

I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions, with
standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted immediately,
the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are basically a
sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in an X pattern
in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the floor joist and
come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum clearance under the
shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part Since
at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the replacement of
the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that are of the door?


Is there a better solution?


Treat with bleach/antifungal. Stabilize with a wood hardener and reinforce
with filler.
I don't know if particle board/OSB is susceptible to dry rot, but it does
travel thru painted wood once it has begun.

Protect and paint the bottom edge of the particle board face well as this is
where the water runs down to, and pauses before dripping.
When replacing in the future, don't use particle board or OSB, even if it is
intended for outdoor sheathing. (it is meant to be enclosed by other
membranes.)
While it is not in direct contact with the ground, it is ground-adjacent.
I'd consider prefinished cement/concrete board, buit at least use PT.

my 2¢
Scott





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On 5/19/2021 11:16 AM, ScottWW wrote:
"knuttle"* wrote in message ...

I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors
are basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door
and in an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors
overlap the floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist.
The minimum clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all
four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting
that are of the door?


Is there a better solution?


Treat with bleach/antifungal.* Stabilize with a wood hardener and
reinforce with filler.
I don't know if particle board/OSB is susceptible to dry rot, but it
does travel thru painted wood once it has begun.

Protect and paint the bottom edge of the particle board face well as
this is where the water runs down to, and pauses before dripping.
When replacing in the future, don't use particle board or OSB, even if
it is intended for outdoor sheathing. (it is meant to be enclosed by
other membranes.)
While it is not in direct contact with the ground, it is ground-adjacent.

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Default Shed doors

On 5/19/2021 11:12 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Wednesday, May 19, 2021 at 8:18:03 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?


"standard particle board siding"

What do you mean by "standard particle board siding". There are numerous
materials that people refer to as "particle board", often incorrectly.


Do you perhaps mean that the OSB (?) on the interior bottom of the door is
beginning to look like this?


Yes I mean OSB, I can never remember what that is called. My vocabulary
has not gotten past particle board and plywood.

It is not decomposed as shown in the picture, only a large piece of wood
in the OSB is coming loose. The idea was to glue the piece back in, and
then paint, varnish, or something to prevent further degradation.


If so, I've never heard of regluing OSB. There are epoxies that are used to
stop rot and "rebuild" rotten wood, like window sills and thresholds.
Maybe that would work.

Perhaps you could spread epoxy over (and into) the area and then
clamp it to get it back to "flat". Using wax paper between the epoxy
and the boards used to make the clamping form will prevent the
form from sticking to the OSB (or whatever the actual material is).

Another option might be to cut off the damaged area and attach
a new "bottom" perhaps using pocket screws or a backer board
on the inside. Yes, there would be a seam that would need to be
sealed, but without more info (and perhaps a picture) it's tough to
offer specific solutions.



Beyond those couple of inches the OSB is in good conditions, the damage
is in the area between the door and the floor joist in the area where
the door overlaps when it is closed.

All of the suggestion are good and now I have to decide how to proceed.

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On Wed, 19 May 2021 08:17:36 -0400, knuttle
wrote:


I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?


It works for termites and Swedes, maybe it'll work for you.

Is there a better solution?


Perhaps an epoxe penetrating sealer then epoxe "Bondo".
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Default Shed doors

On Wed, 19 May 2021 08:17:36 -0400, knuttle
wrote:


I have a 10 year old shed for my lawn tools, that is 2X constructions,
with standard particle board siding. While the outside was painted
immediately, the inside of the siding was left unpainted. The doors are
basically a sheet of siding with 2x4 around the edge of each door and in
an X pattern in the bottom half of the doors . The doors overlap the
floor joist and come to the bottom of the floor joist. The minimum
clearance under the shed is about 8" and is open on all four sides.

That area between the door and the joist has started to come a part
Since at this time the decomposition is minor, can i stave off the
replacement of the door by gluing the loose particles and painting that
are of the door?

Is there a better solution?


If painting does not work, possibly cut off the bottom of the doors
siding and replace with solid material?
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