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Old April 25th 05, 03:02 PM
Swingman
 
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Default Tapering Jig

For years I've been using one of those $19.95 aluminum tapering jigs and
felt like I've cheated death each and every time I use it to cut tapered
legs. I literally breathe a sigh of relief when that part of a tapered leg
table project is over and done with ... until the next time.

Faced with cutting 12 walnut tapered legs for some commissioned tables
yesterday, I quickly fabricated the simple tapering jig mentioned in FWW's
recent "Power Tools" edition.

Big difference, and a pleasure, and much safer, to use:

http://e-woodshop.net/files/Taperjig1.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/files/Taperjig2.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/files/12Legs.JPG

For anyone else who has been procrastinating, this particular tapering jig
is highly recommended, can be fabricated in well under an hour, is
infinitely adjustable, and beats hell out of my old aluminum wonder, or any
one-off tapering jig I've used.

(Tip: it is not necessary to spend a great deal of time cutting out a
perfectly circular cam ... I simply used a paint can to draw a circle,
freehanded it on the bandsaw in a couple of minutes, then used the
stationary belt sander to touch it up.)

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/17/05






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Old April 25th 05, 03:42 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Swingman wrote:
For years I've been using one of those $19.95 aluminum tapering jigs

and
felt like I've cheated death each and every time I use it to cut

tapered
legs. I literally breathe a sigh of relief when that part of a

tapered leg
table project is over and done with ... until the next time.

Faced with cutting 12 walnut tapered legs for some commissioned

tables
yesterday, I quickly fabricated the simple tapering jig mentioned in

FWW's
recent "Power Tools" edition.

Big difference, and a pleasure, and much safer, to use:

http://e-woodshop.net/files/Taperjig1.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/files/Taperjig2.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/files/12Legs.JPG

For anyone else who has been procrastinating, this particular

tapering jig
is highly recommended, can be fabricated in well under an hour, is
infinitely adjustable, and beats hell out of my old aluminum wonder,

or any
one-off tapering jig I've used.

(Tip: it is not necessary to spend a great deal of time cutting out a
perfectly circular cam ... I simply used a paint can to draw a

circle,
freehanded it on the bandsaw in a couple of minutes, then used the
stationary belt sander to touch it up.)

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/17/05



Thanks for sharing and for the pics. I too hate using the traditional
jigs - mine is a simple homemade version with two boards and a hinge
that roused similar fears each time I used it.

I think I'll build one like your's now - definitely looks safer and
probably easier to set up as well.

Thanks again, and nice legs!

Eric

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Old April 25th 05, 03:55 PM
Swingman
 
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Default


wrote in message

I think I'll build one like your's now - definitely looks safer and
probably easier to set up as well.

Thanks again, and nice legs!


Watch yourself, fella!?

Actually, I forgot to mention how just _much_ easier it is to setup a taper
cut since you have a blade reference edge, just like you do with any table
saw sled.

No more trying to line up the beginning, and end, of the taper with the saw
blade itself, IME a frustrating and imprecise task in any event.

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/17/05


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Old April 25th 05, 04:53 PM
Joe
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Swingman wrote:
For years I've been using one of those $19.95 aluminum tapering jigs

and
felt like I've cheated death each and every time I use it to cut

tapered
legs. I literally breathe a sigh of relief when that part of a

tapered leg
table project is over and done with ... until the next time.

Faced with cutting 12 walnut tapered legs for some commissioned

tables
yesterday, I quickly fabricated the simple tapering jig mentioned in

FWW's
recent "Power Tools" edition.

Big difference, and a pleasure, and much safer, to use:

http://e-woodshop.net/files/Taperjig1.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/files/Taperjig2.jpg
http://e-woodshop.net/files/12Legs.JPG

For anyone else who has been procrastinating, this particular

tapering jig
is highly recommended, can be fabricated in well under an hour, is
infinitely adjustable, and beats hell out of my old aluminum wonder,

or any
one-off tapering jig I've used.

(Tip: it is not necessary to spend a great deal of time cutting out a
perfectly circular cam ... I simply used a paint can to draw a

circle,
freehanded it on the bandsaw in a couple of minutes, then used the
stationary belt sander to touch it up.)

--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/17/05


I always thought those aluminum things looked dangerous, not much
controlling the wood. I made one similar to yours but I installed 3
pieces of T tracks in the sled that run perpendicular to the miter. Use
the same clamps. Works great lots of flexibility
Joey

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Old April 25th 05, 05:49 PM
Swingman
 
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Default


"Joe" wrote in message

I made one similar to yours but I installed 3
pieces of T tracks in the sled that run perpendicular to the miter. Use
the same clamps. Works great lots of flexibility


I agree ... I was planning on doing that to mine the next time I got to
Rockler or Woodcraft and could pick up a short T track. I use those clamps
with T tracks on my drill press table and it would definitely be better to
be able to 'square' the clamp to the workpiece.


--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/17/05




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Old April 25th 05, 07:02 PM
B a r r y
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Swingman wrote:
I quickly fabricated the simple tapering jig mentioned in FWW's
recent "Power Tools" edition.

Big difference, and a pleasure, and much safer, to use:


Very similar to the version I've been using for years.

Too simple to make not to use.

http://www.bburke.com/wood/images/Skinnysledtaper2.jpg

Barry
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Old April 25th 05, 08:02 PM
SonomaProducts.com
 
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Default

Nice!

Yes, I've come to learn that any operation thet gets my heart pumping
is a sign to find a better method.

  #8   Report Post  
Old April 25th 05, 08:06 PM
B a r r y
 
Posts: n/a
Default

SonomaProducts.com wrote:
Nice!

Yes, I've come to learn that any operation thet gets my heart pumping
is a sign to find a better method.



Safe woodworking is like good defense in most sports, boring!

Exciting defense often means someone blew their fundamental duties.

Exciting wooddorking usually means DANGER!

Barry
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Old April 25th 05, 08:25 PM
TheNewGuy
 
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Default

Barry & Swingman,

A question for ya: why have the jig run in the miter slot, instead of
just running/referencing it along the fence?

I would think there would be less fussing with getting the workpiece
perfectly setup on the sled: i.e., with the mitre track version, you
have to set the workpiece angle AND distance perfectly before clamping;
if the whole sled/jig was instead referenced from the TS fence, then
you only have to get the angle right, and finetune the distance w/ the
fence setting.

Or am I missing something.

Thanks,
Chris

B a r r y wrote:
Swingman wrote:
I quickly fabricated the simple tapering jig mentioned in FWW's
recent "Power Tools" edition.

Big difference, and a pleasure, and much safer, to use:


Very similar to the version I've been using for years.

Too simple to make not to use.

http://www.bburke.com/wood/images/Skinnysledtaper2.jpg

Barry


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Old April 25th 05, 08:48 PM
Doug Miller
 
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Default

In article . com, "TheNewGuy" wrote:

A question for ya: why have the jig run in the miter slot, instead of
just running/referencing it along the fence?


With the jig running in the miter slot, you want to make the jig just a bit
too wide so that the first time it's used, a bit of it gets trimmed off. That
turns the jig into a zero-clearance support for the workpiece, and reduces the
possibility of tearout.

There may be other reasons, I don't know, but that's the one that occurs to
me.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt.
And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?


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