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George Saridakis
 
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Default adhesive for replacement velcro on sanding pads

Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George

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Yes George try the 3M adhesive. It comes in a spray can and work very
well. I have also used a product called "Sticky Glue" used in floral
craft places. It is white drys fast and is sticky sticky.


George Saridakis wrote:
Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable

sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid
Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and
changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George


  #3   Report Post  
Denis Marier
 
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Default

Hi George,

At first I used Gorilla glue. I did not like it. Then I used heat resistance contact glue. Since then I am happy with the result. The advantage is that I can remove the velcro without damaging the foam pad. Maybe this thread will come up with something better. The price of heat resistant contact glue is cheap compare to other bonding agents. Between the c'sing head crew and the backing board I use a drop of Gorilla glue or its equivalent to lock in the screw. I learned that they are different type of velcro. I utilized the type that the lobsters fishermen used on their cages.

"George Saridakis" wrote in message ...
Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George

  #4   Report Post  
mac davis
 
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On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 07:15:49 -0500, "George Saridakis"
wrote:

Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George


I use 3M spray, in the "removable" method, on 9 & 12" disk sanders,
haven't tried it on small ones yet..

Personally, I think good ol' rubber cement worked better...


mac

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  #5   Report Post  
George
 
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The 3M Super 7 aerosol has done well for me. Cleaning the surface properly
before use makes a difference. Lighter fluid -Naphtha - works on the goo
and not on the rubber.

wrote in message
oups.com...
Yes George try the 3M adhesive. It comes in a spray can and work very
well. I have also used a product called "Sticky Glue" used in floral
craft places. It is white drys fast and is sticky sticky.


George Saridakis wrote:
Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable

sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid
Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and
changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George






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Darrell Feltmate
 
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George
I have been using simple hot glue without any problems. Try looking at
http://aroundthewoods.com/sander.shtml

--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS Canada
www.aroundthewoods.com
  #7   Report Post  
M.J. Orr
 
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I have tried several products in the past to solve this problem. None of them worked satisfactorily!!. I have found a product that is perfect though. It is called Shoe Goo and is for repairing shoes and boots. I tried it on my sanding mandrel and it works great.......!!! It doesn't get hard or brittle but still holds like steel. If you can't find it locally their web site is www.shoegoo.com . Declaration: I have not been given free samples to test so as to provide a positive review of this item...............:-)

--


M.J. Orr
http://www.island.net/~morr
τΏτ
~

"George Saridakis" wrote in message ...
Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George

  #8   Report Post  
George
 
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Tried it, left lumps. Went back the other way.

Could be the type of hot glue.

"Darrell Feltmate" wrote in message
news:iEeDd.53131$dv1.18054@edtnps89...
George
I have been using simple hot glue without any problems. Try looking at
http://aroundthewoods.com/sander.shtml


  #9   Report Post  
Art and Diane
 
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Like Denis, I've had good luck with contact cement. I repaired 2
mandrels about 5 years ago and they still stick.

Art Learmonth

George Saridakis wrote:

Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable
sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although
Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad
and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George



  #10   Report Post  
Steve Worcester
 
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Tim Skilton, the manufacturer of one of those pads, recommends contact
cement.
I have used several different types of glues and found that most will
give good lumps, noticeably stiffen, or be too brittle.
Contact cement is the best compromise of all of them. Standard Home
Depot/Welbond works great. If it is coming apart from heat, you are
using way too much pressure/speed.
Steve Worcester
www.turningwood.com



Art and Diane wrote:
Like Denis, I've had good luck with contact cement. I repaired 2
mandrels about 5 years ago and they still stick.

Art Learmonth

George Saridakis wrote:

Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable
sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although
Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the

pad
and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George




  #11   Report Post  
Ron Williams
 
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I had a disk spin off the pad yesterday in the midst of a big project, and the contact scrubbed the hooks on the pad so effectively, nothing stuck. I reached for he first handy adhesive - gap filling CA - and a bit of hook-and-loop I had laying about. Its been holding fine, as have several pads I glued that way over the years. I just glued the new stuff right over the old material. Stiffer? Not that I can tell.

Worked for me... Your experience may differ.

Ron Williams
Minn-Dak Woodturners
Moorhead, MN
"George Saridakis" wrote in message ...
Hi Folks,

I have been experimenting with gluing Velcro on those replaceable sanding pads (I use many as I turn professionally), and although Liquid Nails did fasten the replacement Velcro, it stiffened the pad and changed it's sanding characteristics.

Any suggestions?

thanks
George

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mac davis
 
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On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 17:34:06 GMT, "Darrell Feltmate"
wrote:

George
I have been using simple hot glue without any problems. Try looking at
http://aroundthewoods.com/sander.shtml


Darrell.. wouldn't the heat from sanding loosen/remelt the hot glue??



mac

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  #13   Report Post  
Darrell Feltmate
 
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Darrell.. wouldn't the heat from sanding loosen/remelt the hot glue??

Mac
I would have thought so but it has not for the last four or five years, may
be it won't?

--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS Canada
www.aroundthewoods.com


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mac davis
 
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On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 18:15:45 GMT, "Darrell Feltmate"
wrote:

Darrell.. wouldn't the heat from sanding loosen/remelt the hot glue??


Mac
I would have thought so but it has not for the last four or five years, may
be it won't?


actually, Darrell, I'm surprised that you NEED to sand... *g*

You probably have a light touch on what sanding you have to do, and
don't build up much heat..

I'd have to use a bulldozer or plow first on mine.. lol


mac

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Darrell Feltmate
 
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Mac
With some of the woods I use I may start sanding at 180 or as low as 40. In
fact for some of the really spalted stuff, the last "cuts" are likely 40
grit. It is a pleasure to take a shear scraper to a piece of really nice dry
maple and have a surface that only requires a bit of 120 or 180 before
settling down to the fine grits, but it seldom happens. Cross grain is
likely to pull or tear and who knows what burl will do? Ken Bullock
habitually starts to sharpen with 40 or 60 grit and he has turned and sanded
thousands of bowls. I guess my philosophy of sanding is to sand with as
coarse a paper as needed to get the job done as quickly and efficiently as
possible. Then I get to turn the next one :-)

--
God bless and safe turning
Darrell Feltmate
Truro, NS Canada
www.aroundthewoods.com


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