Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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  #11   Report Post  
Old October 26th 12, 07:18 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 143
Default Carbie tipped tools

On Wed, 24 Oct 2012 18:52:38 -0700 (PDT), Fred Holder
wrote:

I'll leave out all the dates, name dropping, etc. and repeat what I
said before... If you want to spend twice as much, buy the EZ tools...

If you want the same tool for a lot less, buy the Woodchuck tools...

Use them for roughing and then use your bowl gouge.... You can NOT get
as smooth a curve or an eye pleasing shape with the roughing tools,
that's why bowl gouges exist...

Carbide is amazing and almost too easy to use... Don't let it lull you
into over confidence as a slip can remove a LOT of material, hopefully
all wood...
Be safe and have fun!


On Oct 18, 1:46*pm, Ray wrote:
On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 18:36:22 -0700 (PDT), Fred Holder









wrote:
On Oct 12, 7:29 pm, Ray wrote:
I have been doing turning for less than 2 years. So far I have
mastered the scraper and the sanding block. Lately I have been doing
bowls. I have watched some of the utube videos on the carbide tipped
tools. Some indicate that they act like a scraper, others like a
skew. Which is more accurate? I see how a round bar can angled to
skew. A square bar would seem to work like a scrapper. They seem to
vary quite a bit in price. Captain Eddy of Big Guys Productions has a
14" x 1/2" square bar with 4 tips for $45. Seems like a deal. Or
will I regret it and wish I had spent more? I am still pretty much a
thrifty novice. Some of my bowls are shown he


http://ray80538.home.comcast.net/~ra...l/segbowl.html


Hello Ray,


I've been turning since 1988, and still like the bowl gouge for bowls;
however, I have several of the Hunter tools. I purchased the first one
about four years ago when Mike Hunter was just getting started. His
tools work very well, I've turned spindles and bowls with them and
many other things. The Easy Rougher and Easy finisher are also good
tools. I got my first ones of those almost three years ago.
Incidentally, I saw both of these when attending the Desert
Woodturning Roundup in Mesa, AZ and purchased two easy roughers, later
I purchased the Easy Finisher. I recently obtained a set of Killian
Tools from Knots and Burls to Bowls in Ontario, Canada. My review of
those toosl is in the November 2012 issue of More Woodturning
Magazine. *I still think people should learn to sharpen and use regular
turning tools, but these carbide tools cut down on the number of trips
to the grinder.


Fred Holder
http://www.morewoodturningmagazine.com


Hi Fred,

Thanks for your response. *I ordered a tool that included 4 carbide
cutters for $45 from eddiecastelin.com *It arrived in 2 days. *I made
the handle and assembled it. *I watched a video on utube on how to
assemble it. *It was easier than the video. *No hatchet required.

The tool cuts well. *It works like a scraper except that it has a much
wider angle of arc that it is able to cut. *It allows me to reach
places that regular tools can't reach ie. the top of inward tapered
bowls. * It will definitely supplement my scrapers and sanding blocks.

You write: " I still think people should learn to sharpen and use
regular turning tools," *If the bowl gouge were the only tool
available to me I would have given up turning shortly after I started.
I am curious why you hold the above opinion.

Thanks

Ray


Hello Ray,

When I started turning in 1988, I used mostly scrapers and had to do a
lot of sanding. Finally, I learned to use the spindle gouge and then
finally a bowl gouge. Neither of the gouges worked as well for me as
the scrapers. Then in 1999, I purchased the One Way gig system and the
gouges started to work much better, up to that time I had sharpened
freehand. I now use diamond wheels and have the Tormek jigs mounted on
my dry grinder. Yes, for turning a bowl, the bowl gouge is the best
tool available, especially with the Ellsworth Grind. Six years ago, I
met Mike Hunter at the Desert Woodturning Roundup and purchased one of
his carbide tools. It works great for many things. Then about four
years ago at the same symposium, I was introduced to the Easy Rougher
and purchased one of each size he had to offer at that time. I use
them for roughing down spindles and also bowl blanks. The advantage of
the carbide tools is that you do not have to rub the bevel to get them
to cut. But there is no way that any of the carbide cutters can
perform as well as a good sharp bowl gouge when turning bowls. The
major advantage the carbide cutters have is the length of time they
maintain a sharp edge, for beginners or people having trouble
sharpening, they are a great tool!!!

Fred Holder
http://www.morewoodturningmagazine.com


  #12   Report Post  
Old October 26th 12, 07:21 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 143
Default Carbie tipped tools

On Wed, 24 Oct 2012 21:54:59 -0700, "coffelt2"
wrote:

Some good points, Chief.... Remember that like most tools, there are
THREE types, not 2...
Cheap, inexpensive and expensive...
An inexpensive toll is usually better made than a cheap one and will
last longer...
I've never seen any evidence that putting somebodys name on a gouge
makes it work any better, so I avoid the expensive stuff... YMWV


"Fred Holder" wrote in message
...
On Oct 18, 1:46 pm, Ray wrote:
On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 18:36:22 -0700 (PDT), Fred Holder









wrote:
On Oct 12, 7:29 pm, Ray wrote:
I have been doing turning for less than 2 years. So far I have
mastered the scraper and the sanding block. Lately I have been doing
bowls. I have watched some of the utube videos on the carbide tipped
tools. Some indicate that they act like a scraper, others like a
skew. Which is more accurate? I see how a round bar can angled to
skew. A square bar would seem to work like a scrapper. They seem to
vary quite a bit in price. Captain Eddy of Big Guys Productions has a
14" x 1/2" square bar with 4 tips for $45. Seems like a deal. Or
will I regret it and wish I had spent more? I am still pretty much a
thrifty novice. Some of my bowls are shown he


http://ray80538.home.comcast.net/~ra...l/segbowl.html


Hello Ray,


I've been turning since 1988, and still like the bowl gouge for bowls;
however, I have several of the Hunter tools. I purchased the first one
about four years ago when Mike Hunter was just getting started. His
tools work very well, I've turned spindles and bowls with them and
many other things. The Easy Rougher and Easy finisher are also good
tools. I got my first ones of those almost three years ago.
Incidentally, I saw both of these when attending the Desert
Woodturning Roundup in Mesa, AZ and purchased two easy roughers, later
I purchased the Easy Finisher. I recently obtained a set of Killian
Tools from Knots and Burls to Bowls in Ontario, Canada. My review of
those toosl is in the November 2012 issue of More Woodturning
Magazine. I still think people should learn to sharpen and use regular
turning tools, but these carbide tools cut down on the number of trips
to the grinder.


Fred Holder
http://www.morewoodturningmagazine.com


Hi Fred,

Thanks for your response. I ordered a tool that included 4 carbide
cutters for $45 from eddiecastelin.com It arrived in 2 days. I made
the handle and assembled it. I watched a video on utube on how to
assemble it. It was easier than the video. No hatchet required.

The tool cuts well. It works like a scraper except that it has a much
wider angle of arc that it is able to cut. It allows me to reach
places that regular tools can't reach ie. the top of inward tapered
bowls. It will definitely supplement my scrapers and sanding blocks.

You write: " I still think people should learn to sharpen and use
regular turning tools," If the bowl gouge were the only tool
available to me I would have given up turning shortly after I started.
I am curious why you hold the above opinion.

Thanks

Ray


Hello Ray,

When I started turning in 1988, I used mostly scrapers and had to do a
lot of sanding. Finally, I learned to use the spindle gouge and then
finally a bowl gouge. Neither of the gouges worked as well for me as
the scrapers. Then in 1999, I purchased the One Way gig system and the
gouges started to work much better, up to that time I had sharpened
freehand. I now use diamond wheels and have the Tormek jigs mounted on
my dry grinder. Yes, for turning a bowl, the bowl gouge is the best
tool available, especially with the Ellsworth Grind. Six years ago, I
met Mike Hunter at the Desert Woodturning Roundup and purchased one of
his carbide tools. It works great for many things. Then about four
years ago at the same symposium, I was introduced to the Easy Rougher
and purchased one of each size he had to offer at that time. I use
them for roughing down spindles and also bowl blanks. The advantage of
the carbide tools is that you do not have to rub the bevel to get them
to cut. But there is no way that any of the carbide cutters can
perform as well as a good sharp bowl gouge when turning bowls. The
major advantage the carbide cutters have is the length of time they
maintain a sharp edge, for beginners or people having trouble
sharpening, they are a great tool!!!

Fred Holder
http://www.morewoodturningmagazine.com

Hi, Ray and Fred,

I have been lurking, and occasionally asking advice here for quite a
few years,
and have always found your advice, Fred, to be very well founded.
As a "wanabe" wood turner, I've tried a couple of lathes, and a few
inexpensive
tools. Could never figure out what the difference could be between a cheap,
but
good high-speed steel tool, and one with a "name".
Am slowly beginning to appreciate that any recently sharpened tool with
a
"good" shape, makes a whole world of difference. I haven't used a
jig, yet, but can easily appreciate what it could do for many turners. Got a
new
(Grizzly) water wheel, and am looking at various home-made jig designs.
One will certainly be for me. Hot, high speed grinders are probably ideal
for experienced turners with a steady hand and a really good eye, but eat
up a lot of my inexpensive tools before a great (or at lest good) grind is
achieved.
Found an unused "Sorby" "carbie" at a garage sale for $5..... it is a
fantastic
scraper, as it hasn't needed sharpening yet, just rotated.
Following advice garnered here, Fred, I've dabbled with gouges a
little, and
attest to your advice and observation that they surely save a lot of
sanding.
(except of course when my lack of expertise nets a huge "catch"... yikes!)

Old Chief Lynn




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