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Old June 12th 04, 02:36 PM
David McNeish
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?

I'm wanting to replace a beech worktop in our kitchen which is past its
best, particularly where it's been wet, like around the Belfast sink
(exposed edges of worktop around the sink, which is mounted beneath the
worktop).

Looking in the Google archives for advice, it seems that laminated
chipboard worktops are a Bad Idea for that style of sink, because of the
ease of water getting into the chipboard. And even if we replaced the
sink with one which is mounted from above the worktop, from past
experience I have doubts about how long the worktop would last before
getting damaged elsewhere.

Other materials I've looked at are Corian (expensive), and marble (only
slightly less expensive). And we don't want another solid wood worktop.

Are there any other solutions, priced somewhere between the cheap-and-
nasty and the how-bloody-much options?

David

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Old June 12th 04, 03:12 PM
BigWallop
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?


"David McNeish" wrote in message
. ..
I'm wanting to replace a beech worktop in our kitchen which is past its
best, particularly where it's been wet, like around the Belfast sink
(exposed edges of worktop around the sink, which is mounted beneath the
worktop).

Looking in the Google archives for advice, it seems that laminated
chipboard worktops are a Bad Idea for that style of sink, because of the
ease of water getting into the chipboard. And even if we replaced the
sink with one which is mounted from above the worktop, from past
experience I have doubts about how long the worktop would last before
getting damaged elsewhere.

Other materials I've looked at are Corian (expensive), and marble (only
slightly less expensive). And we don't want another solid wood worktop.

Are there any other solutions, priced somewhere between the cheap-and-
nasty and the how-bloody-much options?

David


Could you plate the edges of the existing worktop with stainless steel to make
it last a bit longer ?


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Old June 12th 04, 03:20 PM
bigbrian
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?

On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 13:36:10 GMT, David McNeish
wrote:

I'm wanting to replace a beech worktop in our kitchen which is past its
best, particularly where it's been wet, like around the Belfast sink
(exposed edges of worktop around the sink, which is mounted beneath the
worktop).

Looking in the Google archives for advice, it seems that laminated
chipboard worktops are a Bad Idea for that style of sink, because of the
ease of water getting into the chipboard. And even if we replaced the
sink with one which is mounted from above the worktop, from past
experience I have doubts about how long the worktop would last before
getting damaged elsewhere.

Other materials I've looked at are Corian (expensive), and marble (only
slightly less expensive). And we don't want another solid wood worktop.

Are there any other solutions, priced somewhere between the cheap-and-
nasty and the how-bloody-much options?


Possibly in the how bloody much range, but these people (and others,
but these are the people who actually own the quarry) do slate
worktops

www.delaboleslate.co.uk

(click on worktops down the left, and then gallery at the top right)

Prices inevitably depend on how thick you want it

Brian
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Old June 12th 04, 05:02 PM
Michael Mcneil
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?

"David McNeish" wrote in message


I'm wanting to replace a beech worktop in our kitchen which is past its
best, particularly where it's been wet, like around the Belfast sink
(exposed edges of worktop around the sink, which is mounted beneath the
worktop).


Why not refinsh the rest of the worktops and replace the offending
article with a more suitable timber such as teak or iroko? Or do I mean
aforomosia? Or teak or iroko or afrormosia?

If you want a hand with that, post us some piccies\diagrammes.


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Old June 12th 04, 06:03 PM
Grunff
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?

David McNeish wrote:

Looking in the Google archives for advice, it seems that laminated
chipboard worktops are a Bad Idea for that style of sink, because of the
ease of water getting into the chipboard.


Fair enough.


And even if we replaced the
sink with one which is mounted from above the worktop, from past
experience I have doubts about how long the worktop would last before
getting damaged elsewhere.


About 20 years is a reasonable timescale with sensible use.


Other materials I've looked at are Corian (expensive), and marble (only
slightly less expensive). And we don't want another solid wood worktop.

Are there any other solutions, priced somewhere between the cheap-and-
nasty and the how-bloody-much options?


Tiled is an option, but not my choice. IME laminate worktops are the
best solution. They are extremely tough and hard-wearing, a lot more
scratch resistant that most of the alternatives, and very reasonably
priced. Buy good quality laminate worktops - pay around 100-150 for a
4m length.

--
Grunff


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Old June 12th 04, 06:06 PM
Simon
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?


"David McNeish" wrote in message
. ..
I'm wanting to replace a beech worktop in our kitchen which is past its
best, particularly where it's been wet, like around the Belfast sink
(exposed edges of worktop around the sink, which is mounted beneath the
worktop).

Looking in the Google archives for advice, it seems that laminated
chipboard worktops are a Bad Idea for that style of sink, because of the
ease of water getting into the chipboard. And even if we replaced the
sink with one which is mounted from above the worktop, from past
experience I have doubts about how long the worktop would last before
getting damaged elsewhere.

Other materials I've looked at are Corian (expensive), and marble (only
slightly less expensive). And we don't want another solid wood worktop.

Are there any other solutions, priced somewhere between the cheap-and-
nasty and the how-bloody-much options?

David


Granite?


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Old June 13th 04, 09:20 AM
N. Thornton
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?

Paul Mc Cann wrote in message ...

Concrete? Becoming popular across the pond I believe



Could you faux marble the 'crete with a monolithic top layer of white
cement and atristic streaking with brick dust??

Regards, NT
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Old June 13th 04, 09:57 AM
Simon
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?


"N. Thornton" wrote in message
om...
Paul Mc Cann wrote in message

...

Concrete? Becoming popular across the pond I believe



Could you faux marble the 'crete with a monolithic top layer of white
cement and atristic streaking with brick dust??

Regards, NT


http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/..._books_1_1/026
-7066392-8922852

A book called "Concrete Countertops: Design, Forms and Finishes for the New
Kitchen and Bathroom" . I bought it for my sister last year as she kept
asking about how to cast concrete counter tops. A very informative read if
the OP wants to consider that route.


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Old June 13th 04, 10:40 AM
Mike Mitchell
 
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Default Alternative materials for kitchen worktop?

On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 13:36:10 GMT, David McNeish
wrote:

I'm wanting to replace a beech worktop in our kitchen which is past its
best, particularly where it's been wet, like around the Belfast sink
(exposed edges of worktop around the sink, which is mounted beneath the
worktop).

Looking in the Google archives for advice, it seems that laminated
chipboard worktops are a Bad Idea for that style of sink, because of the
ease of water getting into the chipboard.


You're dead right about this! I took extra special care to seal the
cut edges around the aperture for my Ikea ceramic sink. I first
applied a copious amount of white silicone sealant to the sawn faces
of the cut-out in the chipboard, really pushing it into the surface
with a putty knife, then I applied the mastic sealant strip that came
with the sink and pushed the sink in firmly.

Nevertheless, over the last year since the sink was installed, water
has obviously managed to get into the chipboard somehow, as the
worktop is already showing signs of warping and the melamine surface
lifting.

MM

And even if we replaced the
sink with one which is mounted from above the worktop, from past
experience I have doubts about how long the worktop would last before
getting damaged elsewhere.

Other materials I've looked at are Corian (expensive), and marble (only
slightly less expensive). And we don't want another solid wood worktop.

Are there any other solutions, priced somewhere between the cheap-and-
nasty and the how-bloody-much options?

David




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