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  #21   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 06:49 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?



"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Roger Hayter wrote:
Rod Speed wrote:

Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...Synthetics/dp/
B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light


I'd prefer to call it mechanical rather then kinetic energy, without
further information. But perhaps he was suggesting that Wifi was not
really an appropriate radio protocol for the purpose?

All the makers and sellers of them call them kinetic for some strange
reason.


That’s because that’s what they are. They don’t use the static force
of the finger on the button, they use the movement of the button.


  #22   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 06:55 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?

Roger Hayter wrote:

Fredxx wrote:

On 15/03/2019 15:21, Rod Speed wrote:
Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...g-Synthetics/d
p/B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light


So what you are now saying is it uses mechanical energy to generate a
wireless signal.


Designing a nano-scale 433MHz dynamotor might be an interesting exercise
for a graduate student, but hard to modulate. I am imagining a special
cam. But I suspect they convert the force to electrical power first,
perhaps piezoelectric?


Apologies. I mean an RF alternator, not a dynamotor.

--

Roger Hayter
  #23   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 06:59 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?

Rod Speed wrote:

"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Roger Hayter wrote:
Rod Speed wrote:

Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...ting-Synthetic
s/dp/ B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light

I'd prefer to call it mechanical rather then kinetic energy, without
further information. But perhaps he was suggesting that Wifi was not
really an appropriate radio protocol for the purpose?

All the makers and sellers of them call them kinetic for some strange
reason.


That's because that's what they are. They don't use the static force
of the finger on the button, they use the movement of the button.


But the energy supplied is nothing to do with the speed of the press.
The energy provided by the finger is force times distance moved. This
is not kinetic energy at any stage, or if it is, only internal to the
machine. The energy supplied by the operator is not kinetic energy.

--

Roger Hayter
  #24   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 07:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?

Rod Speed wrote:


"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Roger Hayter wrote:
Rod Speed wrote:

Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...Synthetics/dp/
B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light

I'd prefer to call it mechanical rather then kinetic energy, without
further information. But perhaps he was suggesting that Wifi was not
really an appropriate radio protocol for the purpose?

All the makers and sellers of them call them kinetic for some strange
reason.


That’s because that’s what they are. They don’t use the static force
of the finger on the button, they use the movement of the button.

Use of kinetic energy would be use of energy from slowing down
something that's already in motion. Turning a handle or pushing a
lever is simply 'work' as in force x distance.

--
Chris Green
·
  #25   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 08:09 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,806
Default Lonely Psychopathic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert! LOL

On Sat, 16 Mar 2019 05:49:52 +1100, cantankerous trolling senile geezer Rot
Speed blabbered, again:


All the makers and sellers of them call them kinetic for some strange
reason.


Thats because thats what they are. They dont use the static force
of the finger on the button, they use the movement of the button.


Is this still about your Philips Hue ****, psycho? SHOVE that up yours!

--
Bill Wright to Rot Speed:
"That confirms my opinion that you are a despicable little ****."
MID:


  #26   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 08:11 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,806
Default Lonely Psychopathic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert! LOL

On Sat, 16 Mar 2019 05:13:08 +1100, cantankerous trolling senile geezer Rot
Speed blabbered, again:


I'd prefer to call it mechanical rather then
kinetic energy, without further information.


It has to be by the kinetic energy of the finger press.


No, it hasn't, senile idiot!

But perhaps he was suggesting that Wifi was not
really an appropriate radio protocol for the purpose?


Zigbee is in fact by far the best approach because not
only does it get repeated by all the bulbs and battery
powered sensors like the motion sensors, its a proper
non proprietary standard that lets you use other than
Hue devices on your Hue system.


Is this STILL about your Philips Hue ****? Well, shove those up your arse
(after you pulled your head out first)!

--
Sqwertz to Rot Speed:
"This is just a hunch, but I'm betting you're kinda an argumentative
asshole.
MID:
  #27   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 08:15 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,806
Default Lonely Psychopathic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert! LOL

On Sat, 16 Mar 2019 05:33:20 +1100, cantankerous trolling senile geezer Rot
Speed blabbered, again:


So what you are now saying is it uses mechanical energy to generate a
wireless signal.


It actually uses kinetic energy from the button press.


There is NO "kinetic energy" in the button, senile idiot!

Philips has spelt that out but I am about to head out for
the garage sale run so you will have to find that yourself.


Well, get lost then, senile pest!

--
Norman Wells addressing senile Rot:
"Ah, the voice of scum speaks."
MID:
  #28   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 10:43 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 31,766
Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?



"Roger Hayter" wrote in message
...
Fredxx wrote:

On 15/03/2019 15:21, Rod Speed wrote:
Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...g-Synthetics/d
p/B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light


So what you are now saying is it uses mechanical energy to generate a
wireless signal.


Designing a nano-scale 433MHz dynamotor might be an interesting exercise
for a graduate student, but hard to modulate. I am imagining a special
cam. But I suspect they convert the force to electrical power first,
perhaps piezoelectric?


They wouldnt call it kinetic if they did it that way.

They arent cheap and I dont have one so I dont plan to tear
one down to see how they work. Big Clive might well have tho.

  #29   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 10:58 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 31,766
Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?



"Roger Hayter" wrote in message
...
Rod Speed wrote:

"Roger Hayter" wrote in message
...
Rod Speed wrote:

Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...Synthetics/dp/
B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light

I'd prefer to call it mechanical rather then
kinetic energy, without further information.


It has to be by the kinetic energy of the finger press.


I would not describe applying a force of a few hundred
grams over a millimetre or so as "kinetic" energy.


They all do anyway. It isnt just Philips that has one.

Unless you cut off your fingers and throw them at the switch.


Unlikely to sell well dont like that.

But perhaps he was suggesting that Wifi was not
really an appropriate radio protocol for the purpose?


Zigbee is in fact by far the best approach because not
only does it get repeated by all the bulbs and battery
powered sensors like the motion sensors, it's a proper
non proprietary standard that lets you use other than
Hue devices on your Hue system.


Not Wifi then.


Yes, it is, zigbee is just one flavor of wifi.

The bridge plugs into your router using
a cat 5 cable and uses the router wifi.
The bridge doesn't do its own wifi.

  #30   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 11:03 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 31,766
Default Wireless switches for lights - recommendations?



"Roger Hayter" wrote in message
...
Rod Speed wrote:

"Chris Green" wrote in message
...
Roger Hayter wrote:
Rod Speed wrote:

Fredxx wrote
Rod Speed wrote

It uses kinetic energy to send a wifi signal to the base.

You were doing well until this point.

That's what it does. No battery no wires.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Per...ting-Synthetic
s/dp/ B0748MQWP3/ref=dp_ob_title_light

I'd prefer to call it mechanical rather then kinetic energy, without
further information. But perhaps he was suggesting that Wifi was not
really an appropriate radio protocol for the purpose?

All the makers and sellers of them call them kinetic for some strange
reason.


That's because that's what they are. They don't use the static force
of the finger on the button, they use the movement of the button.


But the energy supplied is nothing to do with the speed of the press.


Yes, thats just used to generate a small amount of electrical power.

The energy provided by the finger is force times distance moved.


Wrong with an electrical generator that uses the kinetic energy.

This is not kinetic energy at any stage,


Wrong.

or if it is, only internal to the machine.


Irrelevant.

The energy supplied by the operator is not kinetic energy.


Wrong. Just as wrong as your claim that zigbee isnt wifi.



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