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  #21   Report Post  
Old September 13th 17, 05:50 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 5:43:10 PM UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:
On 13/09/2017 14:52, Chris Green wrote:

Well, sursprising as it may seem I'm in agreement to some extent.
However *some* cordless tools are good and useful. The ones I use
almost daily are my 10.8 volt Li cordless drill and driver. Handy,
light, much faster than a manual screwdriver and work all around our 9
acres, on the boat, etc. etc.


Oh yeas, sorry, I forgot about screwdrivers. I agree totally. I was
really focussed on big-ass tools.



The big-ass Bosch sds drills are awesome!

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Old September 13th 17, 05:58 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 16:39, John Rumm wrote:

I have never really found that a problem with decent batteries, and
having enough of them.


I used to have problems on flats complexes fixing aerials onto masonry
(8 holes per aerial) when I was working my way along a row of small
blocks. Used to recharge from the van. Sort of OK.

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You


That does not need to be true. Many have more than adequate power, but
you need be a bit selective as to what you are doing and where you are
doing it.


Yes but you can't be selective about the work you have to do. And even
fairly light jobs (say drilling 10mm holes in wood) is quicker with a
mains drill.

I agree that battery is OK for really light jobs (polishing a little
dog's nails in a poodle parlour, that sort of thing).


pay more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the
bigger battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the mains
equivalents are usually 1kW+.


Many tools don't require more than a few hundred W - even in mains form.


Well, it's always good to have power in reserve, and anyway I'm really
talking more about bigger tools.I mean, frinstance I have a little
dremel and it slows down if you work it hard. It would be better if it
didn't.

Bill
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Old September 13th 17, 06:00 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 17:14, charles wrote:
In article ,

[Snip]

An electric drill is perhaps a poor example - I doubt I have used my
conventional mains drills more than a couple of times in the last
decade.


Drilling holes in galvanised steel trunking is easier with a mains drill


I was quite happy with my pair of Bosch battery SDS drills until I
bought the same tool but mains powered. Jeez what a difference! Thrice
the watts of course.

Bill
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Old September 13th 17, 06:01 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 16:49, TMH wrote:

You need to buy some decent kit like Makita.



I've just bought a mains Makita recip saw and I think it's great. Really
good design, especially blade changing.

Bill
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Old September 13th 17, 06:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/17 14:31, Bill Wright wrote:

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.
Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking
about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used
an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new
toy is.

Bill


I can counter everything you've just said

10.8V Blue Bosch driver, drill and impact driver are small, light and
surprisingly powerful for their size and I've used mine for years.

36V Bosch garden tools are equal in calibre to mains tools of a similar
size - hedge cutter, lawn mower and strimmer.

Now these do really require you have 2 batteries of the same size (there
are 2-3 different sizes IIRC, big for mower and small or medium for hand
held tools. With 2 batteries, the charging process *nearly* keeps up and
I can do my whole garden on 2 charges, sometimes 3 if the grass is long.

As you can put a small battery in a big tool and vice versa, I do
sometimes finish the hedge with a mower battery.

The convenience, lightness compared to petrol and lack of a damn cable
makes it totally worth while.

Now a contractor doing a large tough hedge would be better off with a
heavy petrol strimmer. But for my hawthorn and most fluffy hedges the
36V works extremely well.



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Old September 13th 17, 06:25 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/17 16:49, TMH wrote:

You need to buy some decent kit like Makita.


I have never seen the owner of battery Makita kit moan


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Old September 13th 17, 06:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

whisky-dave wrote:
On Wednesday, 13 September 2017 16:40:18 UTC+1, Mr Pounder Esquire
wrote:
GB wrote:
On 13/09/2017 15:48, Broadback wrote:

+1 Bill. I purchased a Dyson battery vacuum, it was fine when new,
but
now does not run for l;long and it needs recharging.

I'm still using a mains drill I bought 40 years ago. In the
meantime, I've had to throw away loads of battery powered ones
(mostly NiCd it has to be said), where the tool still works but the
battery is knackered.


Still got the Black and Decker mains drill I got with petrol coupons
38 years ago. It works fine.
The Bosh cordless one that cost 160 nine years is almost useless
now and has not been used much.


Is it the drill or the batteries that are useless, they are two
differnt things ?


Batteries, both of them.


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Old September 13th 17, 06:34 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 16:39, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
GB wrote:
On 13/09/2017 15:48, Broadback wrote:

+1 Bill. I purchased a Dyson battery vacuum, it was fine when new,
but
now does not run for l;long and it needs recharging.


I'm still using a mains drill I bought 40 years ago. In the meantime,
I've had to throw away loads of battery powered ones (mostly NiCd it
has to be said), where the tool still works but the battery is
knackered.


Still got the Black and Decker mains drill I got with petrol coupons 38
years ago. It works fine.
The Bosh cordless one that cost £160 nine years is almost useless now and
has not been used much.



I regularly use my battery powered drill whereas my mains powered drill
gets little use. Today I drilled two holes in soft brick with the
battery drill in less time than it will have taken me to get the mains
extension cord out.

--
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Old September 13th 17, 06:34 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 16:49, TMH wrote:
On 13/09/2017 14:31, Bill Wright wrote:
It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains!
But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I
don't do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a
revelation they are!

Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than
a replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw
would have been £120. A new mains powered saw was £110.

Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when
you don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains
for the charger out to where your working ? Give over!

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You
pay more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the
bigger battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the
mains equivalents are usually 1kW+.

And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much
easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery
equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a
flat battery.

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.
Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess.
Thinking about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have
never used an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited
their new toy is.

Bill


You need to buy some decent kit like Makita.



Just have:-(

Over £1000 quids worth.

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Adam
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Old September 13th 17, 06:48 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default battery tools are crap

On 13/09/2017 14:31, Bill Wright wrote:
It sounds so attractive! No power cord! Use it where there's no mains!
But battery tools are rubbish compared to 110V or mains ones. Now I
don't do site work any more I can buy mains powered tools, and what a
revelation they are!

Firstly there's the fact that a mains powered tool can cost less than a
replacement battery. For instance a battery for my reciprocating saw
would have been £120. A new mains powered saw was £110.

Then there's the fact that battery tools run out of power just when you
don't want them to. So have two or three batteries and run mains for the
charger out to where your working ? Give over!

Then there's the fact that battery tools are always underpowered. You
pay more than twice the price for less than half the power. Even the
bigger battery tools tend to be rated at 300 to 450W, whereas the mains
equivalents are usually 1kW+.

And what a difference having adequate power makes! The job is so much
easier. Mains powered tools just glide through the work. The battery
equivalent would be slowing chugging along, then stopping due to a flat
battery.

Why people buy battery tools to use at home I really don't know.
Ignorance of the customer plus the vendor's sales hype I guess. Thinking
about it, I bet a lot of people who buy a battery drill have never used
an electric drill before, so they won't realise how limited their new
toy is.


Point noted about the fact you meant the bigger tools so there is no
need to mention a 110V impact driver:-).

I now have a very nice and very new 36V Makita SDS and a very nice and
very new 2kg 110V DeWalt SDS.

If I am going to be on site for a while then the 110V drill is my first
choice.

I also chose the 110V angle grinder and the 110V circular saw but I
chose the 18V jigsaw (I can use one of the firms 110V ones if needed for
bigger jobs). My main use for the jigsaw is cutting the case on a CU
swap and power is usually off when I do that.


--
Adam


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