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Old August 26th 05, 06:38 PM
Steve
 
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Default Are push fit plumbing fittings any good?

As an occasional and always very hesitant diy plumber, I've always used
traditional soldered or compression fittings in the past. I'm just
about to fit an outside tap and my local B&Q has a very patchy stock of
fittings. As a result I've bought a brass tap plus a selection of these
new fangled push fit fittings (some copper, some plastic).

I'm a bit wary of the push fit stuff - is there anything I should watch
out for? What if it leaks on test, how do I tighten it up or get it
apart again?

TIA

Steve

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Old August 26th 05, 06:59 PM
Andy Hall
 
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On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 17:38:41 GMT, Steve
wrote:

As an occasional and always very hesitant diy plumber, I've always used
traditional soldered or compression fittings in the past. I'm just
about to fit an outside tap and my local B&Q has a very patchy stock of
fittings. As a result I've bought a brass tap plus a selection of these
new fangled push fit fittings (some copper, some plastic).

I'm a bit wary of the push fit stuff - is there anything I should watch
out for? What if it leaks on test, how do I tighten it up or get it
apart again?

TIA

Steve



The main thing is to follow the manufacturer's instructions.

This usually includes but is not limited to:

- Cut the pipe clean and square using a tubing cutter and not a
hacksaw

- Make sure that the end is thoroughly deburred to avoid slicing any
seals in the fitting.

- Mark the pipe using the distance given by the manufacturer or mark
on the fitting to ensure that the pipe is pushed fully home.



Fittings are generally demountable, although some do require a special
tool to do so. On others you push down on a ring at the mouth of the
fitting.

--

..andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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Old August 26th 05, 09:05 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Steve wrote:
As an occasional and always very hesitant diy plumber, I've always used
traditional soldered or compression fittings in the past. I'm just
about to fit an outside tap and my local B&Q has a very patchy stock of
fittings. As a result I've bought a brass tap plus a selection of these
new fangled push fit fittings (some copper, some plastic).

I'm a bit wary of the push fit stuff - is there anything I should watch
out for? What if it leaks on test, how do I tighten it up or get it
apart again?


Make sure you use the correct pipe inserts for the correct fittings and
dont mix and match. follow all the instructions. I find it very easy to
use and very reliable. Different manafacturers have different methods
of releasing. I find speedfit the best nice and easy to release. Hep20
is a bit of a nightmare to release, or this may be just my lack of
experience with the product.

HTH

Richard


TIA

Steve


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Old August 27th 05, 12:19 AM
[email protected]
 
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Default


Andy Hall wrote:
On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 17:38:41 GMT, Steve
wrote:

As an occasional and always very hesitant diy plumber, I've always used
traditional soldered or compression fittings in the past. I'm just
about to fit an outside tap and my local B&Q has a very patchy stock of
fittings. As a result I've bought a brass tap plus a selection of these
new fangled push fit fittings (some copper, some plastic).

I'm a bit wary of the push fit stuff - is there anything I should watch
out for? What if it leaks on test, how do I tighten it up or get it
apart again?

TIA

Steve



The main thing is to follow the manufacturer's instructions.

This usually includes but is not limited to:

- Cut the pipe clean and square using a tubing cutter and not a
hacksaw


I don't buy this. When I started using plastic pipes I used a hacksaw
and trimmed of the pipe edge. As long as the cut is square all is fine
as the pipe indert isolates the pipe from the O ring as it is being
pushed on the pipe. For a few joints, using a hacksaw and some care,
and all is fine. I use a =A340 gun type pipe cutter as I now use lots of
plastic pipe.

Fittings are generally demountable, although some do require a special
tool to do so. On others you push down on a ring at the mouth of the
fitting.


The Hepworth slimline range are not demountable, as I found out to my
dismay. They are much slimmer than the large bulky Hep2O fittings. Osma
Gold is slim and demountable, requiring a special tool. I try to use
Osma or Hep2O. I avoid Speedfit as I don't like plastic pipe inserts. I
like to use brass Conex compression fitting and plastic where pipes are
difficult to fit and out of sight. Plastic has a DIY image and may turn
people off buying a house. I have used brass push fit fittings and
copper pipe to great effect in positions where pipes are seen. Use
grease on the pipe before pushing on the fitting, otherwisw the O ring
may get dislodged.
=20
--=20
=20
.andy
=20
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl


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Old August 27th 05, 12:19 AM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Andy Hall wrote:
On Fri, 26 Aug 2005 17:38:41 GMT, Steve
wrote:

As an occasional and always very hesitant diy plumber, I've always used
traditional soldered or compression fittings in the past. I'm just
about to fit an outside tap and my local B&Q has a very patchy stock of
fittings. As a result I've bought a brass tap plus a selection of these
new fangled push fit fittings (some copper, some plastic).

I'm a bit wary of the push fit stuff - is there anything I should watch
out for? What if it leaks on test, how do I tighten it up or get it
apart again?

TIA

Steve



The main thing is to follow the manufacturer's instructions.

This usually includes but is not limited to:

- Cut the pipe clean and square using a tubing cutter and not a
hacksaw


I don't buy this. When I started using plastic pipes I used a hacksaw
and trimmed of the pipe edge. As long as the cut is square all is fine
as the pipe indert isolates the pipe from the O ring as it is being
pushed on the pipe. For a few joints, using a hacksaw and some care,
and all is fine. I use a =A340 gun type pipe cutter as I now use lots of
plastic pipe.

Fittings are generally demountable, although some do require a special
tool to do so. On others you push down on a ring at the mouth of the
fitting.


The Hepworth slimline range are not demountable, as I found out to my
dismay. They are much slimmer than the large bulky Hep2O fittings. Osma
Gold is slim and demountable, requiring a special tool. I try to use
Osma or Hep2O. I avoid Speedfit as I don't like plastic pipe inserts. I
like to use brass Conex compression fitting and plastic where pipes are
difficult to fit and out of sight. Plastic has a DIY image and may turn
people off buying a house. I have used brass push fit fittings and
copper pipe to great effect in positions where pipes are seen. Use
grease on the pipe before pushing on the fitting, otherwisw the O ring
may get dislodged.
=20
--=20
=20
.andy
=20
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl


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Old August 27th 05, 11:23 AM
[email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Andy Hall wrote:
On 26 Aug 2005 16:19:49 -0700, wrote:


Andy Hall wrote:



The main thing is to follow the manufacturer's instructions.

This usually includes but is not limited to:

- Cut the pipe clean and square using a tubing cutter and not a
hacksaw


I don't buy this. When I started using plastic pipes I used a hacksaw
and trimmed of the pipe edge. As long as the cut is square all is fine
as the pipe indert isolates the pipe from the O ring as it is being
pushed on the pipe. For a few joints, using a hacksaw and some care,
and all is fine.


You are IMM and I claim my =A35.


More ukdiy paranoia. I was about to write "grow up", then I figured it
isn't worth it.

He said exactly the same and ended up
with a flood.


If I recall rightly he never had a flood, he had a faulty Speedfit
fitting and informed the group to beware. I take notice of this sort of
advice as I don't want problems when I fit pipes. I want to avoid
problem products and areas. I had given up on Speedfit before he posted
about it. I find the new locking Speedfit fittings are expensive and
bulky. I only use Speedfit when they are the only fittings available.
Wickes, B and Q and Homebase stock them as standard and at times I have
no choice. I prefer Osma Gold, which is about the same price as Hep2O
and much neater to look at.

Most, if not all of the plastic plumbing manufacturers explicitly tell
you not to use a hacksaw.


To the OP. That is bunkum. I have made lots of joints using a hacksaw
to cut plastic pipe. Hepworth on this actual group told everyone that a
plastic pipe cutter is not needed, and other tools can be used if care
is taken. A high quality pipe cutter is essential when doing a whole
system as they are very quick and easy. When fitting a sink unit using
a few joints they are not essential. As I have stated, make sure the
end of the pipe is square and trimmed off with a Stanley knife or fine
file. Use a mitre block to get a square cut, if you have one. The pipe
insert protects the O ring from the pipe behind it as the fitting is
pushed on. Any problems will be the O ring snagging any burr on the
pipe edge as the O ring slides over. Keep the pipe and fitting well
greased and twist slightly as you push. If you are only fitting a sink
unit then use high quality compression joints and copper pipes, not
plastic. Compression joints are easy to undo. Brass pushfit fittings
are difficult to undo even using the dismounting tool. The pushfit
flexible connectors can be used on copper pipe without inserts. Make
sure the copper pipe is cut with a sharp pipe cutter and no burred
edges and grease the pipe well. Do not overtighten the pipe cutter as
you turn it as this may oval the pipe. An oval pipe end may not make a
good seal with a pushfit fitting. If you do oval the pipe, push it into
a compression fitting to round it back up again. I now pipe up sink
mixer taps with rigid copper and compression joints. The copper pipe
keeps the mixer tap rigid. When flexible connectors are used the mixer
tap flexes on a thin stainless steel sink unit. This may be a turn off
to a potential house buyer, giving a flimsy DIY feel. I hope this helps

I use a =A340 gun type pipe cutter as I now use lots of
plastic pipe.


These are good, I know, but the casual user can use a =A35 pipe cutter
and get a good and correct result without bodging with a hacksaw


The cheap cutters are not worth it. You may as well use a sharp axe.


=20
=20
--=20
=20
.andy
=20
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl


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