Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old May 14th 21, 11:53 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black steel pipe (see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on either end by 4"x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging about 40 cast iron skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will this pipe support this weight?

Thanks!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-1...00HC/100535170

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Old May 15th 21, 06:07 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Fri, 14 May 2021 14:53:39 -0700 (PDT), Trey Thames
wrote:

I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black steel pipe (see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on either end by 4"x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging about 40 cast iron skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will this pipe support this weight?

Thanks!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-1...00HC/100535170


That's a very long and slender span. I fear that it will sag (so all
the skillets will slide to the center and pull the pipe ends out of
their end sockets in the 4"x4" vertical beams), and/or then maybe the
pipe also buckles in bending abruptly, in both cases dropping
everything on the floor.

That pipe probably needs at least one center support, maybe more.

This needs a four-to-one safety factor, assuming that the pans are
packed as closely as possible (regardless of current intent).

You will have to do some computations:

..https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roark%27s_Formulas_for_Stress_and_Strain

Joe Gwinn
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Old May 15th 21, 06:53 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Joe Gwinn" wrote in message
...

On Fri, 14 May 2021 14:53:39 -0700 (PDT), Trey Thames
wrote:

I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black steel pipe
(see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on either end by
4"x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging about 40 cast iron
skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will this pipe support this
weight?

Thanks!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-1...00HC/100535170


That's a very long and slender span. I fear that it will sag (so all
the skillets will slide to the center and pull the pipe ends out of
their end sockets in the 4"x4" vertical beams), and/or then maybe the
pipe also buckles in bending abruptly, in both cases dropping
everything on the floor.

That pipe probably needs at least one center support, maybe more.

This needs a four-to-one safety factor, assuming that the pans are
packed as closely as possible (regardless of current intent).

You will have to do some computations:

..https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roark%27s_Formulas_for_Stress_and_Strain

Joe Gwinn

------------------------

The standards for guardrails are somewhat relevant to this.

https://up.codes/s/loads-on-handrail...hicle-barriers

"Handrails and guards shall be designed to resist a linear load of 50 pounds
per linear foot (plf) (0.73 kN/m) in accordance with Section 4.5.1 of ASCE
7."

"Handrails and guards shall be designed to resist a concentrated load of 200
pounds (0.89 kN) in accordance with Section 4.5.1 of ASCE 7. "

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owa...able=STANDARDS

"(2) For pipe railings: posts, top rails, and intermediate railings shall be
at least one and one-half inches nominal diameter (schedule 40 pipe) with
posts spaced not more than 8 feet (2.4 m) apart on centers."

While that doesn't directly answer the question, it suggests that some
readily available size of water pipe should be an acceptable answer, and
worth pursuing more closely by defining the load and calculating the second
moment of area, maximum stress and deflection of several sizes.

https://amesweb.info/Beam/simply-sup...oint-load.aspx

The Modulus of Elasticity is assumed to be the same for all steel,
regardless of its hardness. 1 ksi is 1000 psi, pounds per square inch, lbf
is pounds of force rather than of weight. Stress is the tension or
compression force per square inch
in the metal.

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Old May 16th 21, 12:38 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Trey Thames wrote:
I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black steel pipe (see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on either end by 4"x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging about 40 cast iron skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will this pipe support this weight?

Thanks!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-1...00HC/100535170


No problem. 1" gas pipe is about 1-1/4" diameter and quite sturdy. 2-300
pound, distributed static load is nothing.
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Old May 17th 21, 06:37 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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On Saturday, May 15, 2021 at 5:38:10 PM UTC-5, Cydrome Leader wrote:
Trey Thames wrote:
I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black steel pipe (see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on either end by 4"x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging about 40 cast iron skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will this pipe support this weight?

Thanks!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-1...00HC/100535170

No problem. 1" gas pipe is about 1-1/4" diameter and quite sturdy. 2-300
pound, distributed static load is nothing.

Thank you all for your messages and your input!


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Old May 17th 21, 06:31 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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"Trey Thames" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, May 15, 2021 at 5:38:10 PM UTC-5, Cydrome Leader wrote:
Trey Thames wrote:
I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black steel
pipe (see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on either
end by 4"x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging about 40 cast
iron skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will this pipe support
this weight?

Thanks!

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-x-1...00HC/100535170

No problem. 1" gas pipe is about 1-1/4" diameter and quite sturdy. 2-300
pound, distributed static load is nothing.

Thank you all for your messages and your input!

-------------

Unfortunately free structural engineering help can be dangerous like free
legal or medical advice. I'd like someone to check my calculations too, but
I can't complain if they don't.

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Old May 19th 21, 07:46 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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This nominal 1inch pipe - if you told me its actual dimension - two of
three of inner dia, wall thk., outer diameter - or what "Schedule" of
1inch pipe so I can look it up - I'd run the Euler-Bernoulli beam
calculation on it.
You could do Euler-Bernoulli - the familiar beam calc. yourself

Second Moment of Area
v
Section modulus
v
Section Moment capacity
v
Load-bearing capacity

You could also get the expected deflection - which can be had when you
know the Second Moment of Area.

Rich Smith
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Old May 19th 21, 07:10 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Richard Smith wrote:
This nominal 1inch pipe - if you told me its actual dimension - two of
three of inner dia, wall thk., outer diameter - or what "Schedule" of
1inch pipe so I can look it up - I'd run the Euler-Bernoulli beam
calculation on it.
You could do Euler-Bernoulli - the familiar beam calc. yourself

Second Moment of Area
v
Section modulus
v
Section Moment capacity
v
Load-bearing capacity

You could also get the expected deflection - which can be had when you
know the Second Moment of Area.

Rich Smith


what a nerd fest. It's black gas pipe as used in the US. Does it have
guaranteed structural properties? no. Will a 5 foot piece hold up skillets
arranged like clothing in a closet on hangers? yes, it will.





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Old May 20th 21, 09:33 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Cydrome Leader writes:

Richard Smith wrote:
This nominal 1inch pipe - if you told me its actual dimension - two of
three of inner dia, wall thk., outer diameter - or what "Schedule" of
1inch pipe so I can look it up - I'd run the Euler-Bernoulli beam
calculation on it.
You could do Euler-Bernoulli - the familiar beam calc. yourself

Second Moment of Area
v
Section modulus
v
Section Moment capacity
v
Load-bearing capacity

You could also get the expected deflection - which can be had when you
know the Second Moment of Area.

Rich Smith


what a nerd fest. It's black gas pipe as used in the US. Does it have
guaranteed structural properties? no. Will a 5 foot piece hold up skillets
arranged like clothing in a closet on hangers? yes, it will.


You can do this very quickly when you are used to it.
I have some "functions" which run in my text editor.
I've even done an analysis to completion in chalk on my welding bench
at work, just recalling the formulae and doing the arithmetic.

Then you can have really beneficial applications.
eg.
http://www.weldsmith.co.uk/tech/stru...lat_calcs.html
I really really wanted to make sure all my colleagues were alright on
this job.

So - maybe, maybe not - take your own pick

Rich S
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Old May 22nd 21, 06:50 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Trey Thames writes:

I am going to be hanging cast iron skillets from a 1" x 5' black
steel pipe (see link from Hope Depot below). It will be supported on
either end by 4" x4"x5' wood supports. I will probably be hanging
about 40 cast iron skillets which may weigh about 200-300 lbs. Will
this pipe support this weight?


Not an answer to your question but why do you want to do this? 5' =
60" so you're allowing 1.5" per skillet. I have 6 cast iron skillets
that vary in depth from 1.75" to 3.25" in depth. No way to fit 40 of
even the shallowest one into 60".

If by "skillet" you mean, not a frying pan but a griddle, I
have one of those too. It's only 1" to the lip but the handle isn't
coplanar with the cook surface and increases the overall depth to 2".

So just out of curiosity, what are you thinking of with this plan?



--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada


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