Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old October 31st 19, 05:51 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Moving a lathe with feet?

I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.

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Old October 31st 19, 06:16 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 09:51:40 -0700 (PDT)
Davej wrote:

I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.


How heavy is the machine?
How far you going?
What kind of floor do you have?
What condition is the floor???

If you have a smooth cement floor take a look at moving skates. Like
this search:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...eywords=moving skates


--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI

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Old October 31st 19, 06:43 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Moving a lathe with feet?

"Davej" wrote in message
...
I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.


I've moved heavy loads with four trailer tongue jacks bolted to a
temporary frame of 2" wooden planks. Their price is comparable to
regular swivel casters of similar load capacity and you don't need
anything else to raise or lower the load.

If you replace their axles with longer bolts you can attach forked
handles to steer and pull them.


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Old October 31st 19, 06:50 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Moving a lathe with feet?

"Leon Fisk" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 09:51:40 -0700 (PDT)
Davej wrote:

I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.


How heavy is the machine?
How far you going?
What kind of floor do you have?
What condition is the floor???

If you have a smooth cement floor take a look at moving skates. Like
this search:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...eywords=moving
skates
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI


They are also called mice.


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Old October 31st 19, 06:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On Thursday, October 31, 2019 at 12:16:43 PM UTC-5, Leon Fisk wrote:
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 09:51:40 -0700 (PDT) Davej wrote:

I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.


How heavy is the machine?
How far you going?
What kind of floor do you have?
What condition is the floor???

If you have a smooth cement floor take a look at moving skates. Like
this search:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...eywords=moving skates


Thanks, I like that idea!


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Old October 31st 19, 07:16 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,587
Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On 10/31/2019 9:51 AM, Davej wrote:
I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.



Depends on the lathe. I moved my 2000lb 14x40 by lifting it up one end
at a time with a straight pick through the lifting holes and a pair of
farm jacks, then set it down on modestly heavy furniture dollies. By
sweeping up the smooth concrete floor thoroughly two of us easily moved
it to its new locations (twice). One time I left it on the dollies for
two months while I built a machine room in my shop. Dollie wheels
developed small flat spots, but after we got it moving it positioned
easily. Then after it was in position we set it down the same way. One
end at a time. We got it within a couple inches, and were easily able
to use the straight pick to shift it into its exact position.

I don't think I would move anything heavier that way though. The
dollies handled it just fine, but I really think it was the limits of
the casters. I also wouldn't do it by myself for fear of overpowering
it and knocking it over. With two people it was pretty easy.
I did move the saddle and the tail stock all the way to the end opposite
of the head to try and limit the chance of tipping over end wise on the
head, and lifted the head end first. Setting down we lowered the tail
stock end first for the same reason.
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Old October 31st 19, 07:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On 10/31/2019 10:43 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:
"Davej" wrote in message
...
I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.


I've moved heavy loads with four trailer tongue jacks bolted to a
temporary frame of 2" wooden planks. Their price is comparable to
regular swivel casters of similar load capacity and you don't need
anything else to raise or lower the load.

If you replace their axles with longer bolts you can attach forked
handles to steer and pull them.




I LIKE THAT.

Saw a big CNC router table with trailer jacks permanently mounted once.
Of course it was a lot lighter machine.
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Old October 31st 19, 08:06 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 268
Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On 31/10/2019 17:16, Leon Fisk wrote:
On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 09:51:40 -0700 (PDT)
Davej wrote:

I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.

How heavy is the machine?
How far you going?
What kind of floor do you have?
What condition is the floor???

If you have a smooth cement floor take a look at moving skates. Like
this search:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...eywords=moving skates


Just be careful with moving skates as they can shift. I know a guy that
was recently moving his Harrison M300 on skates with a mate and the mate
hadn't noticed a skate had shifted and when they went to move the lathe
it fell on it front writing off most of the lathe. He's selling the
salvageable parts on ebay at the moment. I know a M300 can be moved on
rollers as I have one. What is the lathe you want to move.

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Old October 31st 19, 08:53 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 1,930
Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On Thursday, October 31, 2019 at 9:51:44 AM UTC-7, Davej wrote:
I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes.


An appropriate set of shoes for the feet can be found:

https://www.aerogo.com/weight/5000-20000-lbs/
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Old October 31st 19, 09:20 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 2,563
Default Moving a lathe with feet?

On Thu, 31 Oct 2019 09:51:40 -0700 (PDT), Davej
wrote:

I've seen a number of lathes being moved in various videos on
Youtube, but most of these have a base that can be rolled on
pipes. I need to move a lathe with feet. It has four feet and
each foot is about 4" x 4" on a 22" x 64" pattern. What is the
best approach? Thanks.

Jack it up and put it on a 24X66 platform, then roll it on
pipes????????


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