Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Default Moving Tree Journeyman Mill - sanity check

I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!

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Tom Gardner
 
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wrote in message
oups.com...
I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!


I wish you the very best and feel confident that all will go well, but...DO
YOU HAVE A VIDEO CAMERA? That way, the worst case scenario may bring you a
compensatory income.


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Steve Peterson
 
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I would swap the ropes for some 3" or 4" ratchet straps.
Steve



wrote in message
oups.com...
I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!



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Well, yeas, I have a video camera... How would a video camera bring me
a compensatory income if I get crushed to death? Or do you mean if the
mill breaks loose on the freeway and kills a bunch of other people? Or
do you mean that it's a bad idea and doesn't pass a sanity check?

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George
 
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wrote:

I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car


I don't believe that any of the car rental companies will rent a
vehicle for towing. The only place around here (Illinois) that I can
get one is a local rent-a-center, but they charge something unholy
like 90c per mile for an F-350 pickup truck.

A 24' truck is a whole lot cheaper for that distance. Typically they
run about $60 a day plus 20c per mile. You can rent a fork truck on
your end for about $100 a day delivered and picked up from your home.

And you are right about a lift gate. The ones that come with the
aforementioned 24' truck are all rated at 2,000 Lb.


and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!




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Thanks, that's a good idea. I'll pick some up. I have some 1" or 2"
straps, but it's better to be safe then sorry.

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ATP*
 
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wrote in message
oups.com...
I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!


You should be using properly tensioned chains fore and aft, secured to
substantial eyes on the trailer. It should be secured as well as a vehicle
or heavy equipment would be. You should get some advice from a local
truck/trailer place that sells DOT approved chain and hardware. Make sure
the rigging passes muster so you can avoid accidents or trouble with the
policia.


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The thing with a moving truck that troubles me is this: how do I fasten
the mill down inside the truck?

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Gunner
 
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On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 13:51:01 -0500, "Steve Peterson" 123@nospam
wrote:

I would swap the ropes for some 3" or 4" ratchet straps.
Steve

$12 at Home Depot for the good ones.

And Jeff? Rent the forklift, or findout if your local towing company
will unload it with their boom wrecker.

Gunner



wrote in message
roups.com...
I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!



Rule #35
"That which does not kill you,
has made a huge tactical error"
  #13   Report Post  
Eric R Snow
 
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On 12 Apr 2005 11:05:45 -0700, wrote:

I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!

Save yourself some powerful grief. I rented a diesel flatbed that had
a bed about 4 feet in the air. I think it was an Isuzu. Anyway, the
lathe I was moving weighed about 5000 lbs. I told the rental place
what I was planning on moving and they said "no problem". After
loading with a forklift and securing the lathe properly with chains
and binders I took it out on an empty road and did a few panic stops
and swervs. I could hardly tell the thing was there. So I drove home
with it and never had to worry about rolling or spilling my load. And
having a truck with the proper capacity made a huge difference. Once
back at the shop I used another fork lift to unload it. Can you have a
fork lift delivered to your place? It can make life so much easier.
When I removed the lathe I just lifted it clear of the truck and my
son drove the truck away. This way there was no fork lift travel with
a load high in the air. After lowering gently I placed the lathe in
the shop. And there was NEVER any time when someone was near enough to
the load to be hurt if I lost the load. Remember that those straps
have a HUGE capacity to absorb and release energy. If one breaks it
can whip someone really hard and cause bad injuries. Be sure the
straps are protected from abrason and that if one breaks everyone is
out of the way of anywhere it might land. If it costs you 200 bucks
extra for the lift at home maybe it's just good insurance. Sorry about
the kinda rant. I live with constant pain from crushing injuries (not
related to moving machines though) and it aint worth it. I know how
you feel about wanting to do it all yourself, I still try to do some
thing I shouldn't. But if a 3000 lb machine gets away and you are in
it's way you won't even slow it up. More likely you'll just grease the
skids so to speak and it'll slide further on your blood.
ERS
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Peter Grey
 
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By the time you rent a truck, buy tie downs, pay mileage, rent a forklift,
and spend the time, could you pay someone to deliver it? I'm just
wondering... Is it that expensive?

I paid a rigger to deliver my mill and it cost about the same as I would
have spent had I rented the stuff needed to do it myself. Of course, my
mill was only 30 miles away so obviously YMMV.

Peter

wrote in message
oups.com...
I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!



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Tom Gardner
 
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WOW, even my sick brain didn't even conceive those nasty thoughts. Your
move seems perfectly orchestrated and you have the main ingredient for
success---UNBRIDLED FEAR! I was just poking a little comic relief into a
tense situation. Best wishes!


wrote in message
ups.com...
Well, yeas, I have a video camera... How would a video camera bring me
a compensatory income if I get crushed to death? Or do you mean if the
mill breaks loose on the freeway and kills a bunch of other people? Or
do you mean that it's a bad idea and doesn't pass a sanity check?





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Doug Schultz
 
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would you not be cheaper and more secure to have it shipped??
surely there is a cartage company that can handle it?
Train maybe?


Doug


wrote in message
oups.com...
I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!



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I think that it's one of the problems with email, the tone didn't
really come through for me. I didn't mean to imply you were thinking
something like that, I just didn't know what you really meant.

I'm nervous about moving this thing. If I can find a big enough truck
I'll haul it on a trailer, but I'm really having a hard time finding
something I can rent to haul it with.

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Good suggestion. I didn't even think about a boom wrecker.

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Koz
 
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wrote:

I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!



Weight sounds like a journeyman 325. The machine is quite top heavy,
even with the knee down as the footprint is not that large.

This unit has holes for lifting eyes at the top. To the best of my
knowledge the eyes have a 1" dia thread mount. If the eyes have been
removed, get some to re-install and use as tie points while moving.
Also, rent a lift that can crane the unit by the eyes rather than lift
from the bottom.

Personaly, I'd pay to have it moved. Although you can probably scab
together a move yourself, even the slightest problem could make it such
a pain that it's not worth the hassle. Around my area, there is a used
equipment dealer (excavators, dozers, etc) that will load a lift on
their lowboy and move stuff like this for a good price. You might see of
there is similar in your area.

Koz

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Thanks for the reply. I have some injuries from a motorcycle accident,
and I agree that it's important to be safe. It's not worth it to hurt
myself for *any* peice of equipment. And I understand that this mill
would easily kill me if it fell on me. It would be a big enough problem
if it just tipped over...

I don't think I can find a big pick-up truck to haul this thing on a
trailer, so it looks like I'll need to find something else, and use a
fork lift to unload it. I'll look into a flat bed.

Thanks for the advice.



  #22   Report Post  
Larry Jaques
 
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On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 21:10:39 -0400, the inscrutable "ATP*"
spake:


"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
.. .
On 12 Apr 2005 16:05:09 -0700, the inscrutable
spake:

The thing with a moving truck that troubles me is this: how do I fasten
the mill down inside the truck?


Many moving trucks have side cleats for fastening tiedowns. Ask the
renter if you can also lag it down if it has a boltdown base. Put it
forward in the truck as far as possible and centered. Then it won't
break or become a projectile if it breaks loose if you hit something
or if you have to stop really fast. (Those are 3 nasty IFs.)


I have never seen anything in a box truck substantial enough for securing a
3,500 pound machine. Anything attached to the sides would not be sufficient.


Maybe it's only the large moving van trailers which have the sturdy
tiedown posts. I haven't rented a bobtail in a long time, 30 years
now. I drove my Olds into one in Phoenix to pull back to CA. It was
a good thing, too. The steering coupler broke on the ramp into the
truck. I kicked the wheels straight, prayed, and got it in. 'Twas fun
installing the coupler while still in the truck when I got home, too.
Ah, to be young again...



I'm thinking about putting some kind of anchors in the floor of my box
truck, but for the most part I've found a trailer to be a more practical way
to move machinery.


Yeah, the lowboy types would be perfect for that. I helped move dozens
of pieces of heavy medical equipment in LoCal on those things. Baird
Gamma Cameras, bone densitometers, etc. Nothing fun like a mill or
lathe.


----------------------------------
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  #23   Report Post  
ATP*
 
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 21:10:39 -0400, the inscrutable "ATP*"
spake:


"Larry Jaques" wrote in message
. ..
On 12 Apr 2005 16:05:09 -0700, the inscrutable
spake:

The thing with a moving truck that troubles me is this: how do I fasten
the mill down inside the truck?

Many moving trucks have side cleats for fastening tiedowns. Ask the
renter if you can also lag it down if it has a boltdown base. Put it
forward in the truck as far as possible and centered. Then it won't
break or become a projectile if it breaks loose if you hit something
or if you have to stop really fast. (Those are 3 nasty IFs.)


I have never seen anything in a box truck substantial enough for securing
a
3,500 pound machine. Anything attached to the sides would not be
sufficient.


Maybe it's only the large moving van trailers which have the sturdy
tiedown posts.


I don't have experience with big moving vans of that type. I'm thinking more
of the typical rental truck or van body under 21,000 GVW. The box truck
bodies sometimes have D-rings attached to the sides, but they are only
secured to the rather lightweight aluminum U-channel uprights. Some have an
aluminum ladder-like channel for strapping, but I think the intention is
more to control relatively lightweight or vertically stable loads from
shifting laterally.


I haven't rented a bobtail in a long time, 30 years
now. I drove my Olds into one in Phoenix to pull back to CA. It was
a good thing, too. The steering coupler broke on the ramp into the
truck. I kicked the wheels straight, prayed, and got it in. 'Twas fun
installing the coupler while still in the truck when I got home, too.
Ah, to be young again...


I put a Chevette in the back of my box truck once. The car didn't make it
all the way into the back of the truck via the makeshift ramp, so I had to
back up to a tree and use a ratcheting strap to pick up the back end of the
car. It was about this time that a detective showed up to check out the
whole operation.




I'm thinking about putting some kind of anchors in the floor of my box
truck, but for the most part I've found a trailer to be a more practical
way
to move machinery.


Yeah, the lowboy types would be perfect for that. I helped move dozens
of pieces of heavy medical equipment in LoCal on those things. Baird
Gamma Cameras, bone densitometers, etc. Nothing fun like a mill or
lathe.


----------------------------------
VIRTUE...is its own punishment
http://www.diversify.com Website Applications
==================================================



  #24   Report Post  
George
 
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Eric R Snow wrote:

On 12 Apr 2005 11:05:45 -0700, wrote:

I'm going to pick up a Tree Journeyman Mill and haul it about 300
miles, from Lancaster to Orange County, CA. The mill is about 3,500
pounds, which puts the mill alone 500 pounds over the limit I can haul
with my car. So, what I'm planning on doing is renting a big SUV or a
van from Avis/Budget/etc... rent-a-car and hauling on either a lowboy
utility trailer or a car trailer with a wooden floor. (Another option
is to rent a moving truck with alift gate, but I don't think the gates
normally lift 3,500 pounds.)

I'll make sure the mill is solidly in place at it's feet by screwing
some 2x4's to the wooden trialer deck as cleats. The knee will be down
as low as I can get it, and I'll have eight or ten lengths of good
quality rope tied to the top of the mill and the trailer to make sure
it doesn't tip over.

I should have no problem loading the mill onto a trailer with a
forklift, however, I won't have a forklift at my house to unload it.

The mill will be bolted to some 4x4 skids so I can haul it down the
trailer into my garage. There's a post set into concrete that I can use
with a come-along to haul it off the trailer.

I've moved some heavy lathes (~1 ton) and a Hardinge Mill, so I have
some idea of the dangers of what I'm getting into. I'm just a little
nervous about unloading the mill. Maybe I should rent a fork lift for
the day...

Please let me know if you have any suggestions!

Save yourself some powerful grief. I rented a diesel flatbed that had
a bed about 4 feet in the air. I think it was an Isuzu. Anyway, the
lathe I was moving weighed about 5000 lbs. I told the rental place
what I was planning on moving and they said "no problem". After
loading with a forklift and securing the lathe properly with chains
and binders I took it out on an empty road and did a few panic stops
and swervs. I could hardly tell the thing was there. So I drove home
with it and never had to worry about rolling or spilling my load. And
having a truck with the proper capacity made a huge difference. Once
back at the shop I used another fork lift to unload it. Can you have a
fork lift delivered to your place? It can make life so much easier.
When I removed the lathe I just lifted it clear of the truck and my
son drove the truck away. This way there was no fork lift travel with
a load high in the air. After lowering gently I placed the lathe in
the shop. And there was NEVER any time when someone was near enough to
the load to be hurt if I lost the load. Remember that those straps
have a HUGE capacity to absorb and release energy.


My son and I moved a punch press a couple of months ago. Those things
are really top heavy so I strapped the press to the vertical rails of
the fork truck.

He drove the fork truck outside and was just starting to lift it to
put it on the truck. I told him to hold up a sec while I took the
strap off. He'd already lifted the press an inch or so. Of course the
vertical rail doesn't raise so the strap was quite tight. I flipped
the ratchet open all the way and it let go.

Man did it let go!

Gouged my thumb. Blood splattered all over the place.

So yea Eric, they can store a surprising amount of energy.

If one breaks it
can whip someone really hard and cause bad injuries. Be sure the
straps are protected from abrason and that if one breaks everyone is
out of the way of anywhere it might land. If it costs you 200 bucks
extra for the lift at home maybe it's just good insurance. Sorry about
the kinda rant. I live with constant pain from crushing injuries (not
related to moving machines though) and it aint worth it. I know how
you feel about wanting to do it all yourself, I still try to do some
thing I shouldn't. But if a 3000 lb machine gets away and you are in
it's way you won't even slow it up. More likely you'll just grease the
skids so to speak and it'll slide further on your blood.
ERS


  #26   Report Post  
 
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Have you considered having the local flat bed wrecker company make a
run out to Lancaster for you? I wonder what they would charge

I thought about hiring a flat-bed to haul it, but I think the tilting
bed would be too difficult to manage with a top-heavy mill. If that
thing tips over at my house I'm pretty much screwed...

I was hoping to move this tomorrow, but I haven't been able to find a
truck. I was going to try with a big moving van, but no one seems to
have one that I could safely tie the mill down in. They're all
basically furniture moving trucks...

Does any one know of a place to rent a boom or a flatbed truck around
Orange County? Or any place I could rent a Ford F-350 or equivalent? Or
any equipment movers that they'd recommend?

  #27   Report Post  
Larry Jaques
 
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On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 20:32:58 -0400, the inscrutable "ATP*"
spake:

I said:
Maybe it's only the large moving van trailers which have the sturdy
tiedown posts.


I don't have experience with big moving vans of that type. I'm thinking more
of the typical rental truck or van body under 21,000 GVW. The box truck
bodies sometimes have D-rings attached to the sides, but they are only
secured to the rather lightweight aluminum U-channel uprights. Some have an
aluminum ladder-like channel for strapping, but I think the intention is
more to control relatively lightweight or vertically stable loads from
shifting laterally.


True. Then again, the trucks aren't supposed to be hit or hit
anything.


I haven't rented a bobtail in a long time, 30 years
now. I drove my Olds into one in Phoenix to pull back to CA. It was
a good thing, too. The steering coupler broke on the ramp into the
truck. I kicked the wheels straight, prayed, and got it in. 'Twas fun
installing the coupler while still in the truck when I got home, too.
Ah, to be young again...


I put a Chevette in the back of my box truck once. The car didn't make it
all the way into the back of the truck via the makeshift ramp, so I had to
back up to a tree and use a ratcheting strap to pick up the back end of the
car. It was about this time that a detective showed up to check out the
whole operation.


Hehehe. That must have been interesting.


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  #29   Report Post  
AL
 
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I've had the need to rent a truck like this, but haven't had any luck
finding one in the Chicago area. Maybe I haven't looked hard enough. But
can an ordinary person drive one of these? Or do I need a CDL?

I'm amazed that you can't find a truck to rent. I just called the
rental place I used in Washington and they said it was either a Hino
(most likely) or an Isuzu. flatbed. These trucks both had 12 foot beds
with 10,000 lb capacity. Lots of points to chain to. And chains, rated
for the load, are the way to go. Orange County is way more populated
than where I live. There must be a truck rental place that has what
you want. In fact, I just googled truck rentals in Orange county CA.
Here is a truck that will work: $75 rental, $.36 mile, stake bed that
will easily handle 3000 lbs. In Buena park. 714-521-5602
ERS



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Default Moving Tree Journeyman Mill - sanity check

replying to Koz, Ggg wrote:
The thread count for my 325 Journeyman is 10tpi. I can thread a 3/4-10 bolt
1.5" in but it is loose like the diameter is too small. Coincidentally a 13/16
dia. Coarse thread is also 10 tpi. Does anybody know for sure what size the
lifting holes on top of the head are? I'm having a very hard time finding any
kind of 13/16-10 bolts.

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Default Moving Tree Journeyman Mill - sanity check

On Thu, 04 May 2017 00:18:02 GMT, Ggg
wrote:

replying to Koz, Ggg wrote:
The thread count for my 325 Journeyman is 10tpi. I can thread a 3/4-10 bolt
1.5" in but it is loose like the diameter is too small. Coincidentally a 13/16
dia. Coarse thread is also 10 tpi. Does anybody know for sure what size the
lifting holes on top of the head are? I'm having a very hard time finding any
kind of 13/16-10 bolts.

Maybe the thread is metric. 20mm x 2.5 pitch.
Eric
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Default Moving Tree Journeyman Mill - sanity check

replying to Ggg, Ggg wrote:
The thread turned out to be metric, M20-2.50. I mistakenly ordered a 30mm long
thread which looked awfully short once I saw them, but they held when the
machine was lifted. I would order a 50mm long for a piece of mind if I were to
do it again.

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Default Moving Tree Journeyman Mill - sanity check

replying to etpm, Ggg wrote:
Eric you are correct, thank you.

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