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Old August 1st 20, 03:44 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture. The old one was difficult
to remove. The new one will not totally seat in the fixture. Can some kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

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Old August 1st 20, 04:14 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

Lindgs m writes:

I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture. The old one was difficult
to remove. The new one will not totally seat in the fixture. Can some kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?


I don't think so, but those posts that hold the lamp can be replaced.
While you are at it, take the fixture down, replace the lamp holders,
remove the ballast and put an LED tube in there.

You'll be happy you did and odds are, you'll never replace that tube again.

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Old August 1st 20, 04:36 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

I had no idea that LED replacements for florescent tubes lasted forever!
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Old August 1st 20, 04:41 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On 8/1/20 9:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

I think what you're after is called conductive grease. Something
like this:
https://www.amazon.com/NO-OX-ID-Tube-Special-Grease-Compound/dp/B00HSW341A/ref=sr_1_40?crid=3C8MFDS7V4KG9&dchild=1&keywords=c onductive+grease&qid=1596296036&sprefix=conductive +gr%2Caps%2C193&sr=8-40

or
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3duq8vy

The makers of that stuff are pretty proud of it price wise.
You don't want dielectric grease which is non conductive.

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Old August 1st 20, 07:42 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

And LEDs don’t contain all that mercury, which is a problem when throwing out. They still have arsenic and lead, though.
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Old August 1st 20, 07:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On 8/1/2020 2:42 PM, wrote:
And LEDs don’t contain all that mercury, which is a problem when throwing out. They still have arsenic and lead, though.


You can save the arsenic in case you need it later.
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Old August 1st 20, 09:26 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 11:41:24 AM UTC-4, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On 8/1/20 9:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

I think what you're after is called conductive grease. Something
like this:
https://www.amazon.com/NO-OX-ID-Tube-Special-Grease-Compound/dp/B00HSW341A/ref=sr_1_40?crid=3C8MFDS7V4KG9&dchild=1&keywords=c onductive+grease&qid=1596296036&sprefix=conductive +gr%2Caps%2C193&sr=8-40

or
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3duq8vy

The makers of that stuff are pretty proud of it price wise.
You don't want dielectric grease which is non conductive.


ACtually, I think dielectric grease is what you would want to use. It's
what's used in auto lamp holders for example. Conductive grease would
create a current path. Dielectric grease works by keeping it lubricated
so it won't corrode, but it gets easily pressed out of the way of the
contact point so a good contact is made.

Bit I've yet to see a tube fixture that needed it. I'd suspect if you
put the bulb in correctly and twist, it will seat. Sometimes they can
be tricky, not sure grease will help. And agree that if it were my fixture,
I'd be looking at a new LED fixture as the first choice, or maybe a
retrofit if it can't be changed easily. They don't cost much, sure look
and work a lot better and use less electricity.



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Old August 1st 20, 09:50 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On 8/1/20 3:26 PM, trader_4 wrote:
On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 11:41:24 AM UTC-4, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On 8/1/20 9:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

I think what you're after is called conductive grease. Something
like this:
https://www.amazon.com/NO-OX-ID-Tube-Special-Grease-Compound/dp/B00HSW341A/ref=sr_1_40?crid=3C8MFDS7V4KG9&dchild=1&keywords=c onductive+grease&qid=1596296036&sprefix=conductive +gr%2Caps%2C193&sr=8-40

or
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3duq8vy

The makers of that stuff are pretty proud of it price wise.
You don't want dielectric grease which is non conductive.


ACtually, I think dielectric grease is what you would want to use. It's
what's used in auto lamp holders for example. Conductive grease would
create a current path. Dielectric grease works by keeping it lubricated
so it won't corrode, but it gets easily pressed out of the way of the
contact point so a good contact is made.

Bit I've yet to see a tube fixture that needed it. I'd suspect if you
put the bulb in correctly and twist, it will seat. Sometimes they can
be tricky, not sure grease will help. And agree that if it were my fixture,
I'd be looking at a new LED fixture as the first choice, or maybe a
retrofit if it can't be changed easily. They don't cost much, sure look
and work a lot better and use less electricity.

Temptation would've gotten the best of me if I was doing it for
myself. I would have tried the WD-40 or powdered graphite if I really
thought it was needed. Then I would have waited a couple hours to let
things settle out.

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Old August 2nd 20, 01:30 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Fluorescent tube (replacement)

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 13:26:51 -0700 (PDT), trader_4
wrote:

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 11:41:24 AM UTC-4, Dean Hoffman wrote:
On 8/1/20 9:44 AM, Lindgs wrote:
I am trying t replace a tube in a kitchen fixture.* The old* one was
difficult
to remove.* The new one will not totally seat in the fixture.* Can some
kind
of lubricant (WD40) be put on the pins to facilitate the installation?

I think what you're after is called conductive grease. Something
like this:
https://www.amazon.com/NO-OX-ID-Tube-Special-Grease-Compound/dp/B00HSW341A/ref=sr_1_40?crid=3C8MFDS7V4KG9&dchild=1&keywords=c onductive+grease&qid=1596296036&sprefix=conductive +gr%2Caps%2C193&sr=8-40

or
https://preview.tinyurl.com/y3duq8vy

The makers of that stuff are pretty proud of it price wise.
You don't want dielectric grease which is non conductive.


ACtually, I think dielectric grease is what you would want to use. It's
what's used in auto lamp holders for example. Conductive grease would
create a current path. Dielectric grease works by keeping it lubricated
so it won't corrode, but it gets easily pressed out of the way of the
contact point so a good contact is made.

Bit I've yet to see a tube fixture that needed it. I'd suspect if you
put the bulb in correctly and twist, it will seat. Sometimes they can
be tricky, not sure grease will help. And agree that if it were my fixture,
I'd be looking at a new LED fixture as the first choice, or maybe a
retrofit if it can't be changed easily. They don't cost much, sure look
and work a lot better and use less electricity.



I lot depends on the fixture itself. If it was cheap to begin with,
buying a new LED ready to go is probably right but for the same amount
of work you can just hot wire the tombstones, remove the ballast and
use the direct wire LED. That is certainly a better idea if this is
some kind of designer fixture you really like. They are supposed to be
good for 10,000 hours or more so that is. quite a number of years if
you are only using it a few hours a day. The old school F-40s in our
walk in closet are 20+ years old. I have never replaced them but they
only get used minutes a day.

Also pay attention to the color. LEDs come anything from a warm 2700k
to an arc light "stalag 17" 6000k maybe even "hotter".


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