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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your eyeball?
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Default CAUTION!!! Birdbrain, the Abnormal Pathological Attention Whore, Strikes, AGAIN!

On Fri, 14 Dec 2018 18:41:11 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson",
"Steven ******","Bruce Farquar", "Fred Johnson, etc.), the pathological
resident idiot and attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

FLUSH the abnormal sociopathic attention whore's latest attention-baiting
sick bull**** unread again

--
about Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL)
trolling:
"He is a well known attention seeking troll and every reply you
make feeds him.
Starts many threads most of which die quick as on the UK groups anyone
with sense Kill filed him ages ago which is why he now cross posts to
the US groups for a new audience.
This thread was unusual in that it derived and continued without him
to a large extent and his silly questioning is an attempt to get
noticed again."
MID:

--
ItsJoanNotJoann addressing Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"You're an annoying troll and I'm done with you and your
stupidity."
MID:

--
AndyW addressing Birdbrain:
"Troll or idiot?...
You have been presented with a viewpoint with information, reasoning,
historical cases, citations and references to back it up and wilfully
ignore all going back to your idea which has no supporting information."
MID:

--
Phil Lee adressing Birdbrain Macaw:
"You are too stupid to be wasting oxygen."
MID:

--
Phil Lee describing Birdbrain Macaw:
"I've never seen such misplaced pride in being a ****ing moronic motorist."
MID:

--
Tony944 addressing Birdbrain Macaw:
"I seen and heard many people but you are on top of list being first class
ass hole jerk. ...You fit under unconditional Idiot and should be put in
mental institution.
MID:

--
Pelican to Birdbrain Macaw:
"Ok. I'm persuaded . You are an idiot."
MID:

--
DerbyDad03 addressing Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"Frigging Idiot. Get the hell out of my thread."
MID:

--
Kerr Mudd-John about Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"It's like arguing with a demented frog."
MID:

--
Mr Pounder Esquire about Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"the **** poor delivery boy with no hot running water, 11 cats and
several parrots living in his hovel."
MID:

--
Rob Morley about Birdbrain:
"He's a perennial idiot"
MID: 20170519215057.56a1f1d4@Mars

--
JoeyDee to Birdbrain
"I apologize for thinking you were a jerk. You're just someone with an IQ
lower than your age, and I accept that as a reason for your comments."
MID: l-september.org

--
Sam Plusnet about Birdbrain (now "James Wilkinson Sword" LOL):
"He's just desperate to be noticed. Any attention will do, no matter how
negative it may be."
MID:

--
asking Birdbrain:
"What, were you dropped on your head as a child?"
MID:
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?* Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home).* But what if it got your
eyeball?


A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.

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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 14 Dec 2018 19:41:34 -0800, Bob F
wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?* Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home).* But what if it got your
eyeball?


Does it still hurt? The pain will go away. How is your vision? Bleery
or an actual obstructed view in one eye. A little damage to the eyeball
that is not in front of the pupil probably won't hurt you, but you might
want to see an ophthamologist. You should be checked for glaucoma every
few years anyhow.

Victor Riesel, an investigative newspaper "journalist and columnist",
had acid thrown in his face by mobsters, when he was 43 years old, and
he was blind the rest of his life (but he continued to write his column
until he was 76). These days I think they have ways to smooth things
over. at least if the damage is small.

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.


I could use that these days.

Where do I disconnect that ground and how do I get my phone struck by
lightning?

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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

Fred Johnson wrote

Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?


Unlikely. Don't think it ever produces a sore or anything
with the normal sort of static that you are likely to get.

Normally you just jump and swear with a static shock to
your finger etc, but I've found two instances on google
of pain lasting a few days when someone got a shock
on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle
they were smelling, and one from a blanket at home).


But what if it got your eyeball?


Should be fine.


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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

Well the answer is that it depends Normally static at home is not dangerous
as the voltage is very high but the current is low and the duration brief.
I'd expect no more damage to the eye than if it got scratched by flying
debris or whatever, and I'm sure we have all experienced that.
Obviously there are places and nerves that can be affected, and there are
lots of nerves in the finger tips and parts of the face, but generally
things get back to normal in a few hours.
Having been near two lightning strikes I can tell you its not pleasant, but
if your friend really had experienced a lightning strike directly to the
phone line the phone and her would be toast. No matter how earthed a device
is, it cannot cope with the huge current of lightning. In one case I was
standing by a building that got hit, and a split second before it happened
I felt my hair being pulled and prickled all over. No time to do or say
anything. a huge flash and a very very loud bang and I was deaf for about
five minutes with an effect like ears full of water for about another ten.
You do not want to be that close. The heat I and others felt was quite bad,
but luckily none of us were burned but there was a bloody great hole in the
roof of the warehouse just next to the door. all the computers and
electronic gear were destroyed.

The second time I was walking our dog and it hit an Electricity pylon just
by where I was standing. Same again from the sound and radiated heat, but no
static this time.
I blame the tinnitus I get on the first one myself. Not much one can do
about it though.
So your answer is as I say, it depends, but if its merely like you get off
filing cabinets, car doors, vacuum cleaner pipes earthed screws on light
switches or duvets, then its unlikely to cause permanent harm, and just be
an irritation.
Brian

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"Bob F" wrote in message
news
On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally you
just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone got
a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?


A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning struck
while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the phone line
protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her hearing was
hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.



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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

Yes I suspect that it coincided with her ear wax moving about a bit.
I see that those electrical shows are still popular where people use their
bodies to draw huge sparks and invite members of the audience to try it.
When I was young I used to play with electricity, high voltage in the ranges
of thousands of volts but I did do it safely using high value resistors to
current limit the shocks you got. In fact it could often only be felt as a
tiny burn on the point of the body the spark jumped from.

Its the current that does the damage.
Not sure health and safety would allow what I did in school these days
though.
There are some things you can still get to play with very high voltages
safely. One used to be called a violet Wand. Basically a tesla coil and you
could see the corona around the charged up tip. Back in the early part of
the century, people use to pay for electric therapy with this thing which of
course tingled as it was passed over parts of the body. I'm not totally sure
this was not just a way to get sexual thrills but then I was not around, but
similar things are still made.


Van der Graff generators Windshurst machines etc, both use the static build
up model to create their high voltages and one has to be careful not to add
capacitors to them as the discharge from one of those will kill yu if it
crosses the heart.
Brian

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"micky" wrote in message
...
In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 14 Dec 2018 19:41:34 -0800, Bob F
wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?


Does it still hurt? The pain will go away. How is your vision? Bleery
or an actual obstructed view in one eye. A little damage to the eyeball
that is not in front of the pupil probably won't hurt you, but you might
want to see an ophthamologist. You should be checked for glaucoma every
few years anyhow.

Victor Riesel, an investigative newspaper "journalist and columnist",
had acid thrown in his face by mobsters, when he was 43 years old, and
he was blind the rest of his life (but he continued to write his column
until he was 76). These days I think they have ways to smooth things
over. at least if the damage is small.

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way
louder.


I could use that these days.

Where do I disconnect that ground and how do I get my phone struck by
lightning?



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Default Troll-feeding Senile YANKIETARD Alert!

On Fri, 14 Dec 2018 19:41:34 -0800, Bob F, the notorious troll-feeding
senile Yankietard, blathered again:

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.


....and senile idiot no.1 couldn't resist swallowing the abnormal Scottish
attention whore's latest idiotic bait, hook, line and sinker again! tsk
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Default Lonely Psychotic Senile Ozzie Troll Alert! LOL

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:23:06 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rot Speed,
the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the two prize idiot's usual sick troll **** unread again

--
Another retarded "conversation" between Birdbrain and senile Rot:

Senile Rot: " Did you ever dig a hole to bury your own ****?"

Birdbrain: "I do if there's no flush toilet around."

Senile Rot: "Yeah, I prefer camping like that, off by myself with
no dunnys around and have always buried the ****."

MID:
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:41:34 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?


A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.


Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a plastic tube to the socket.


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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a plastic
tube to the socket.


Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a plastic
tube to the socket.


Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.


I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or something?
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Friday, December 14, 2018 at 10:45:08 PM UTC-5, Bob F wrote:
On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?* Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home).* But what if it got your
eyeball?


A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.



Did it turn her into a lib?


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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 4:16:47 AM UTC-5, Brian Gaff wrote:
Well the answer is that it depends Normally static at home is not dangerous
as the voltage is very high but the current is low and the duration brief.
I'd expect no more damage to the eye than if it got scratched by flying
debris or whatever, and I'm sure we have all experienced that.
Obviously there are places and nerves that can be affected, and there are
lots of nerves in the finger tips and parts of the face, but generally
things get back to normal in a few hours.
Having been near two lightning strikes I can tell you its not pleasant, but
if your friend really had experienced a lightning strike directly to the
phone line the phone and her would be toast. No matter how earthed a device
is, it cannot cope with the huge current of lightning.


That isn't true. If it was, telephone central offices would be routinely
blown up by lightning, so would internet services, computer centers
and similar. All have lightning hits on lines that go into the building.
All are protected by tiered layers of protection. You can do
the same with your house. First thing, if the lightning hit an overhead
phone line outside the house, the vast majority of the energy isn't going
to make it inside, to her phone, even with no protection. The voltages are
so high that arc over occurs. And with tiered surge protection inside,
the rest of the surge can be dealt with.




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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a plastic
tube to the socket.


Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.


I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or something?


Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector installed,
bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or underground.



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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:23:28 -0000, trader_4 wrote:

On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a plastic
tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.


I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or something?


Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector installed,
bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or underground.


You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any lightning problems in UK phone lines.

There might be surge protectors within the main socket, but they're not earth bonded.

I don't know why you have them protected if they're underground though.
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:11:20 -0000, trader_4 wrote:

On Friday, December 14, 2018 at 10:45:08 PM UTC-5, Bob F wrote:
On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?


A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.



Did it turn her into a lib?


No, they shout louder, they don't hear louder.
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

In article , Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:23:28 -0000, trader_4
wrote:


On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any
BT master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming
through a plastic tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone
wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when
building or something?


Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector
installed, bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or
underground.


You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any
lightning problems in UK phone lines.


Lighting entering the building via the phone line did a lot of damage to
the BBC TV transmitter on Lewis some years ago. I've also seen the
resulting damage to a former colleague's house in the London area

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:24:21 -0000, charles wrote:

In article , Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:23:28 -0000, trader_4
wrote:


On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any
BT master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming
through a plastic tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone
wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when
building or something?

Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector
installed, bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or
underground.


You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any
lightning problems in UK phone lines.


Lighting entering the building via the phone line did a lot of damage to
the BBC TV transmitter on Lewis some years ago. I've also seen the
resulting damage to a former colleague's house in the London area


Was that an overhead line locally? Or was there an overhead part on the trunk phone cabling?
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 06:08:56 -0000, micky wrote:

In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 14 Dec 2018 19:41:34 -0800, Bob F
wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?


Does it still hurt? The pain will go away. How is your vision? Bleery
or an actual obstructed view in one eye. A little damage to the eyeball
that is not in front of the pupil probably won't hurt you, but you might
want to see an ophthamologist. You should be checked for glaucoma every
few years anyhow.


They were google results, I've never experienced it myself.

Victor Riesel, an investigative newspaper "journalist and columnist",
had acid thrown in his face by mobsters, when he was 43 years old, and
he was blind the rest of his life (but he continued to write his column
until he was 76). These days I think they have ways to smooth things
over. at least if the damage is small.


You'd think the acid would only damage the outer layers of the eyeball, which should be repairable, unless it got inside the eye socket and dripped round the back?

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way louder.


I could use that these days.

Where do I disconnect that ground and how do I get my phone struck by
lightning?


Can't you just rig something up with a Van-de-Graff or the insides of an insect zapper and a phone not connected to the main line?


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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

In article , Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:24:21 -0000, charles
wrote:


In article , Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:23:28 -0000, trader_4
wrote:


On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in
any BT master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs
coming through a plastic tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in
the early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there
will be a ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are
underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone
wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when
building or something?

Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector
installed, bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or
underground.


You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any
lightning problems in UK phone lines.


Lighting entering the building via the phone line did a lot of damage
to the BBC TV transmitter on Lewis some years ago. I've also seen the
resulting damage to a former colleague's house in the London area


Was that an overhead line locally? Or was there an overhead part on the
trunk phone cabling?


Local overhead line. The rocky ground makes digging trenches quite a
problem. I doubt if a strike on the trunk line would get through to just
one subscriber.

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:48:06 -0000, charles wrote:

In article , Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:24:21 -0000, charles
wrote:


In article , Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:23:28 -0000, trader_4
wrote:

On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie
wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in
any BT master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs
coming through a plastic tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in
the early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there
will be a ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are
underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone
wires (but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when
building or something?

Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector
installed, bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or
underground.

You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any
lightning problems in UK phone lines.

Lighting entering the building via the phone line did a lot of damage
to the BBC TV transmitter on Lewis some years ago. I've also seen the
resulting damage to a former colleague's house in the London area


Was that an overhead line locally? Or was there an overhead part on the
trunk phone cabling?


Local overhead line. The rocky ground makes digging trenches quite a
problem. I doubt if a strike on the trunk line would get through to just
one subscriber.


Did they not have a surge protector? Or was it just not strong enough?
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

I once got a bit of grit in my eye that I couldn't dislodge (after DIY plasterboard work I think), it was damn annoying. After 3 days of it becoming increasingly irritating, I went to Specsavers and they washed it out free of charge, and also gave me an eye test free of charge (presumably both in the hope they could sell me expensive specs). But my eyesight was "surprisingly perfect for a 40 year old - more like that of a teenager". I guess I never grew up :-)

I only saw the effects twice - not sure where the lightning came in, but a row of 4 computers in a youth club had their soundcards fried (literally black in places). Apart from short speaker cables to little computer speakers, I'm not sure why the lightning would have gone in that way. The network cards were fine, but then they tend to have surge arrestors (spark gaps) in them. Nothing else on the computers were damaged. The other time was the network card in a computer in someone's house - that could have been the phone line, although he reckoned a small fork of the lightning came THROUGH the house and landed on the phone cable running along the hall (his computer was fairly central in the building).


On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 09:16:37 -0000, Brian Gaff wrote:

Well the answer is that it depends Normally static at home is not dangerous
as the voltage is very high but the current is low and the duration brief.
I'd expect no more damage to the eye than if it got scratched by flying
debris or whatever, and I'm sure we have all experienced that.
Obviously there are places and nerves that can be affected, and there are
lots of nerves in the finger tips and parts of the face, but generally
things get back to normal in a few hours.
Having been near two lightning strikes I can tell you its not pleasant, but
if your friend really had experienced a lightning strike directly to the
phone line the phone and her would be toast. No matter how earthed a device
is, it cannot cope with the huge current of lightning. In one case I was
standing by a building that got hit, and a split second before it happened
I felt my hair being pulled and prickled all over. No time to do or say
anything. a huge flash and a very very loud bang and I was deaf for about
five minutes with an effect like ears full of water for about another ten.
You do not want to be that close. The heat I and others felt was quite bad,
but luckily none of us were burned but there was a bloody great hole in the
roof of the warehouse just next to the door. all the computers and
electronic gear were destroyed.

The second time I was walking our dog and it hit an Electricity pylon just
by where I was standing. Same again from the sound and radiated heat, but no
static this time.
I blame the tinnitus I get on the first one myself. Not much one can do
about it though.
So your answer is as I say, it depends, but if its merely like you get off
filing cabinets, car doors, vacuum cleaner pipes earthed screws on light
switches or duvets, then its unlikely to cause permanent harm, and just be
an irritation.
Brian

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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 06:23:06 -0000, Rod Speed wrote:

Fred Johnson wrote

Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?


Unlikely. Don't think it ever produces a sore or anything
with the normal sort of static that you are likely to get.

Normally you just jump and swear with a static shock to
your finger etc, but I've found two instances on google
of pain lasting a few days when someone got a shock
on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle
they were smelling, and one from a blanket at home).


But what if it got your eyeball?


Should be fine.


Bet you wouldn't stick your eyeball up to a Van-de-Graff.
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On 12/15/2018 4:57 AM, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:41:34 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?* Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home).* But what if it got your
eyeball?


A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way
louder.


Where is this protective ground?* There certainly isn't one in any BT
master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic tube to the socket.


The ground that was disconnected was a wire from the phone box on the
house to a pipe, in this case, where a hose bibb was on the side of the
house.

I have made sure that both the phone and cable boxes are directly
connect to my ground rod using a large (about 1/8") copper ground wire.


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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 18:47:58 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/15/2018 4:57 AM, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:41:34 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way
louder.


Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT
master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic tube to the socket.


The ground that was disconnected was a wire from the phone box on the
house to a pipe, in this case, where a hose bibb was on the side of the
house.

I have made sure that both the phone and cable boxes are directly
connect to my ground rod using a large (about 1/8") copper ground wire.


Not sure what you mean by "phone box on the house". In the UK an underground twisted pair wire inside a plastic hose comes right inside the house and terminates in a socket on the inside of a room wall (same size as a lightswitch or power outlet). There's no earthing anywhere, unless it's further back at the exchange or a junction box.
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Default Troll-feeding Senile IDIOT Alert!

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 GMT, Harry Bloomfield, another brain dead
troll-feeding senile idiot, driveled again:


Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.


This idiot will fall for ANY bait the Scottish sow sets out for him! LOL
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Default Troll-feeding Senile YANKIETARD Alert!

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 07:23:28 -0800 (PST), tardo_4 an especially stupid,
troll-feeding, senile Yankietard, blathered:


Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector installed,
bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or underground.


I suppose that YOU, tardo_4, recognize the unwashed Scottish ****** and
troll by the taste of his cock already! G
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Default Troll-feeding Senile IDIOT Alert!

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:24:21 +0000 (GMT), charles, another brain dead,
troll-feeding, senile idiot, blathered:

You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any
lightning problems in UK phone lines.


Lighting entering the building via the phone line did a lot of damage to
the BBC TV transmitter on Lewis some years ago. I've also seen the
resulting damage to a former colleague's house in the London area


Unbelievable: the Scottish attention whore sets out some stupid bait ...and
some senile idiot will run along to take it, EVERY time! LOL
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Default Troll-feeding Senile IDIOT Alert!

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:48:06 +0000 (GMT), charles, another mentally
challenged, troll-feeding, senile idiot, driveled again:


Was that an overhead line locally? Or was there an overhead part on the
trunk phone cabling?


Local overhead line. The rocky ground makes digging trenches quite a
problem. I doubt if a strike on the trunk line would get through to just
one subscriber.


The retarded Scottish attention whore asks some idiotic (baiting) "question"
....and this senile idiot will run along to answer it, EVERY time! LOL


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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On 12/15/2018 11:18 AM, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 18:47:58 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/15/2018 4:57 AM, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:41:34 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm?* Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but
I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they
were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home).* But what if it got your
eyeball?

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way
louder.

Where is this protective ground?* There certainly isn't one in any BT
master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic tube to the socket.


The ground that was disconnected was a wire from the phone box on the
house to a pipe, in this case, where a hose bibb was on the side of the
house.

I have made sure that both the phone and cable boxes are directly
connect to my ground rod using a large (about 1/8") copper ground wire.


Not sure what you mean by "phone box on the house".* In the UK an
underground twisted pair wire inside a plastic hose comes right inside
the house and terminates in a socket on the inside of a room wall (same
size as a lightswitch or power outlet).* There's no earthing anywhere,
unless it's further back at the exchange or a junction box.


It could be that they really don't use a ground for underground phone
connections. Since there's a separate wire set for each residence, there
is less likelihood of faults at a neighbor getting into your wiring. If
you have cable TV, is there a ground there?

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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?



"Kristy Ogilvie" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT
master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic
tube to the socket.


Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.


I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires
(but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or
something?


Or something most likely. Likely the conduit is there but was collapsed
by a truck or something so they took the easy way out and went overhead.

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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:20:57 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/15/2018 11:18 AM, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 18:47:58 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/15/2018 4:57 AM, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 03:41:34 -0000, Bob F wrote:

On 12/14/2018 10:41 AM, Fred Johnson wrote:
Could static electricity to the eyeball cause lasting harm? Normally
you just jump and swear with a static shock to your finger etc, but
I've
found two instances on google of pain lasting a few days when someone
got a shock on their nose (one in a shop from a perfume bottle they
were
smelling, and one from a blanket at home). But what if it got your
eyeball?

A neighbor of mine got shocked by her landline phone when lightning
struck while I was talking to her on my phone. It turned out that the
phone line protective ground had been disconnected. She said that her
hearing was hyper-sensitive for weeks after that. Everything was way
louder.

Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT
master socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic tube to the socket.

The ground that was disconnected was a wire from the phone box on the
house to a pipe, in this case, where a hose bibb was on the side of the
house.

I have made sure that both the phone and cable boxes are directly
connect to my ground rod using a large (about 1/8") copper ground wire.


Not sure what you mean by "phone box on the house". In the UK an
underground twisted pair wire inside a plastic hose comes right inside
the house and terminates in a socket on the inside of a room wall (same
size as a lightswitch or power outlet). There's no earthing anywhere,
unless it's further back at the exchange or a junction box.


It could be that they really don't use a ground for underground phone
connections. Since there's a separate wire set for each residence, there
is less likelihood of faults at a neighbor getting into your wiring.


Yes, they don't join until they get to an exchange or at least a cabinet (mine is to a cabinet since I have fibre internet to the cabinet), where there probably is grounding.

If you have cable TV, is there a ground there?


Can't tell you about cable TV, we don't have it here, we all use aerials or satellite dishes.
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"Kristy Ogilvie" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:23:28 -0000, trader_4
wrote:

On Saturday, December 15, 2018 at 9:52:09 AM UTC-5, Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT
master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic
tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires
(but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or
something?


Here in the US all phone lines I've seen had a surge protector installed,
bonded to ground, at the house, whether over head or underground.


You maybe get more storms there? I've not actually heard of any lightning
problems in UK phone lines.


Yes you have, a few like the turnip have reported losing a router to it.

There might be surge protectors within the main socket, but they're not
earth bonded.


I don't know why you have them protected if they're underground though.


You can get a substantial spike on underground phone lines with a close
lightning strike. You can also get the underground mulitipair cables fried
by lighting and have to be replaced after that too.

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Default Troll-feeding Senile YANKIETARD Alert!

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 10:47:58 -0800, Bob F, the notorious troll-feeding
senile Yankietard, blathered again:


I have made sure that both the phone and cable boxes are directly
connect to my ground rod using a large (about 1/8") copper ground wire.


The troll made sure that you senile Yankietard will KEEP sucking him off,
any time he feels like getting sucked off by you!


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On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 12:20:57 -0800, Bob F, the notorious troll-feeding
senile Yankietard, blathered again:

It could be that


It could be that HE is using YOU for his successful trolling here, you
****ed up senile troll-feeding idiot!
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:44:52 -0000, Rod Speed wrote:



"Kristy Ogilvie" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT
master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic
tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.


I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires
(but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or
something?


Or something most likely. Likely the conduit is there but was collapsed
by a truck or something so they took the easy way out and went overhead.


But it's a couple of hundred houses. And the overhead lines are from poles to each house.
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Default Static electricity to the eyeball?

On 2018-12-15 2:12 p.m., Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:44:52 -0000, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Kristy Ogilvie" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground?* There certainly isn't one in any BT
master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic
tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires
(but underground mains wires).* Did they forget them when building or
something?


Or something most likely. Likely the conduit is there but was collapsed
by a truck or something so they took the easy way out and went overhead.


But it's a couple of hundred houses.* And the overhead lines are from
poles to each house.


there's a giant rock under the ground ,
the ground water is too close to the top ,
the shovel guy was sick that day
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On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 21:29:33 -0000, % % wrote:

On 2018-12-15 2:12 p.m., Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:44:52 -0000, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Kristy Ogilvie" wrote in message
news On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground? There certainly isn't one in any BT
master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic
tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone wires
(but underground mains wires). Did they forget them when building or
something?

Or something most likely. Likely the conduit is there but was collapsed
by a truck or something so they took the easy way out and went overhead.


But it's a couple of hundred houses. And the overhead lines are from
poles to each house.


there's a giant rock under the ground ,
the ground water is too close to the top ,
the shovel guy was sick that day


Ground water is possible. It's clay soil in my garden, and BT has a problem with a wet junction box under the pavement in the culdesac.

If I dig, I get water only 2 feet below the ground in the rainy season.

ROFL, rainy season, this is Scotland, so that's 364 days a year. I like summer in Scotland, this year it was a Wednesday.
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On 2018-12-15 2:39 p.m., Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 21:29:33 -0000, % % wrote:

On 2018-12-15 2:12 p.m., Kristy Ogilvie wrote:
On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:44:52 -0000, Rod Speed
wrote:



"Kristy Ogilvie" wrote in message
news On Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:43:50 -0000, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Kristy Ogilvie brought next idea :
Where is this protective ground?* There certainly isn't one in
any BT
master
socket I've seen, just a couple of twisted pairs coming through a
plastic
tube to the socket.

Some service lines would be fitted with a ground connection in the
early GPO days, but I doubt any are now. Most likely there will be a
ground at the pole or the cabinet.

I assume this is only for overhead lines anyway, mine are underground.

Strangely some newer houses in the next block have overhead phone
wires
(but underground mains wires).* Did they forget them when building or
something?

Or something most likely. Likely the conduit is there but was collapsed
by a truck or something so they took the easy way out and went
overhead.

But it's a couple of hundred houses.* And the overhead lines are from
poles to each house.


there's a giant rock under the ground ,
the ground water is too close to the top ,
the shovel guy was sick that day


Ground water is possible.* It's clay soil in my garden, and BT has a
problem with a wet junction box under the pavement in the culdesac.

If I dig, I get water only 2 feet below the ground in the rainy season.

ROFL, rainy season, this is Scotland, so that's 364 days a year.* I like
summer in Scotland, this year it was a Wednesday.


i live about 500 miles south of alaska ,
we don't have summer we have day time and night time
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