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  #1   Report Post  
charlie hagen
 
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Default 'egress' windows

Hello,

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too small and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for this
purpose?

and,

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?

Thanks,

chuck


  #2   Report Post  
m Ransley
 
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Default 'egress' windows

Egress windows are for throwing out the egrets, you dont want them
around.

  #3   Report Post  
Minnie Bannister
 
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Default 'egress' windows

An "egress window" is a window that meets certain requirements: no more
than x inches above floor level, minimum of y sq. ft. opening, etc., etc.

Your local Building Dept. can tell you what your municipality's specific
rules are, but you can probably find the general rules with a Google
search for "egress window".

Unless you want to have a super-size window well to allow for complete
opening of a casement window, a sliding window is probably going to be best.

MB


On 03/19/04 09:17 pm charlie hagen put fingers to keyboard and launched
the following message into cyberspace:

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too small and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for this
purpose?

and,

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?

  #4   Report Post  
ameijers
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows


"charlie hagen" wrote in message
.net...
Hello,

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she

wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too small

and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for

this
purpose?

and,

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?

Egress window, as the name implies, means you should be able to egress the
space through the window. Most regular windows don't open a big enough hole
for that, so egress windows are usually tall horizontal sliders. But they
don't have to be. Any window that provides a big enough hole for an adult to
step through would probably pass code. Think 2/3 scale sliding door. Your
local code office can provide the exact dimensions. And since it is
installled below grade, you want a rot-proof frame. The hardest parts will
be cutting the hole in the basement wall bigger, and providing the stepup or
platform inside, and the enlarged (preferably stepped) window well outside.

The big-box place is probably the wrong place to go for advice. The local
precast concrete place that sells pre-made window-well boxes, or the
concrete sawing company that you will want to make the hole bigger and redo
the lintel above, can both probably hook you up with a brand name and part
number to order, and tell you what local inspectors like to see. If you have
never done concrete work, I'd hire the whole window mod out, personally.
Experience and the right tools make a big difference. And if your yard is
big enough to spare the space, and you are digging holes anyway, I'd dig one
deep enough for an actual exterior door to the basement, and a long window
well to add several daylight windows. Natural light makes a basement a lot
more inviting.

aem sends...

  #5   Report Post  
Artys Homo Haven
 
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Default 'egress' windows

wrote

Egress windows are for throwing out the egrets, you dont want them
around.


Now, if we could only install a pansy window so you could fly out.......




  #6   Report Post  
Jeff Cochran
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows

On Sat, 20 Mar 2004 02:17:11 GMT, "charlie hagen"
wrote:

Hello,

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too small and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.


Egress windows will open to provide a clear space of a specified
height and width for exit by a person. Check your building code for
the required size, and any decent window shop in your area will be
able to show you everything you need to know.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for this
purpose?


Yes, one that specifically meets your code. I's a required life
safety code item.

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?


Building department and window store.

Jeff
  #7   Report Post  
Tom Baker
 
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Default 'egress' windows

"charlie hagen" wrote in message k.net...
Hello,

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too small and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for this
purpose?

and,

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?

Thanks,

chuck


There are several "model codes", and you do have to check with your
local building official to confirm local requirements. Here are
sections from the International Residential Code ( IRC ) 2000 which
should give at least a good idea of the code issues involved.

Section R310 Emergency Escape and Rescue Openings.
R310.1 Emergency escape and rescue required. Basements with habitable
space and every sleeping room shall have at least one openable
emergency escape and rescue window or exterior door opening for
emergency escape and rescue. Where openings are provided as a means of
escape and rescue they shall have a sill height of not more than 44
inches above the floor. Where a door opening having a threshold below
the adjacent ground elevation serves as an emergency escape and rescue
opening and is provided with a bulkhead enclosure, the bulkhead
enclosure shall comply with section R310.3. the net clear opening
dimensions required by this section shall be obtained by the normal
operation of the window or door opening from the inside. Escape and
rescue window openings with a finished sill height below the adjacent
ground elevation shall be provided with a window well in accordance
with Section R310.2.

R310.1.1 Minimum opening area. All emergency escape and rescue
openings shall have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet.

R310.1.2 Minimum opening height. The minimum net clear opening height
shall be 24 inches.

R310.1.3 Minimum opening width. The minimum net clear opening width
shall be 20 inches.

R310.1.4 Operational constraints. emergency escape and rescue openings
shall be operational from the inside of the room without the use of
keys or tools.

R310.2 Window wells. Window wells required for emergency escape and
rescue shall have horizontal dimensions that allow the door or window
of the emergency escape and rescue opening to be fully opened. The
horizontal dimensions of the window well shall provide a minimum net
clear area of 9 square feet with a minimum horizontal projection and
width of 36 inches.

Exception: The ladder or steps required by Section R310.2.1 shall be
permitted to encroach a maximum of 6 inches into the required
dimensions of the window well.

R310.2.1 Ladder and steps. Window wells with a vertical depth greater
than 44 inches below the adjacent ground level shall be equipped with
a permanently affixed ladder or steps usable with the window in the
fully open position. Ladders or steps required by this section shall
not be required to comply with Sections R314 and R315. Ladders or
rungs shall have an inside width of at least 12 inches, shall project
at least 3 inches from the wall and shall be spaced not more than 18
inches on center vertically for the full height of the window well.

R310.3 Bulkhead enclosures. Bulkhead enclosures shall provide direct
access to the basement. The bulkhead enclosure with the door panels in
fully open position shall provide the minimum net clear opening
required by Section R310.1.1. Bulkhead enclosures shall also com;y
with Section R314.9.

R310.4 Bars, grills, covers and screens. Bars, grills, covers, screens
or similar devices are permitted to be placed over emergency escape
and rescue openings, bulkhead enclosures, or window wells that serve
such openings, provided the minimum net clear opening size complies
with Sections R310.1.1 to R310.1.3, and such devices shall be
releasable or removable from the inside without the use of a key, tool
or force greater than that which is required for normal operation of
the escape and rescue opening.
  #8   Report Post  
Michael
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows

Hello,

I am considering putting in a basement bedroom which requires a larger
window. Does it make financial sense to do this? Will I ever see return
on the expense?

Mike





"Tom Baker" wrote in message
om...
"charlie hagen" wrote in message

k.net...
Hello,

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she

wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too small

and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in

basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for

this
purpose?

and,

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?

Thanks,

chuck


There are several "model codes", and you do have to check with your
local building official to confirm local requirements. Here are
sections from the International Residential Code ( IRC ) 2000 which
should give at least a good idea of the code issues involved.

Section R310 Emergency Escape and Rescue Openings.
R310.1 Emergency escape and rescue required. Basements with habitable
space and every sleeping room shall have at least one openable
emergency escape and rescue window or exterior door opening for
emergency escape and rescue. Where openings are provided as a means of
escape and rescue they shall have a sill height of not more than 44
inches above the floor. Where a door opening having a threshold below
the adjacent ground elevation serves as an emergency escape and rescue
opening and is provided with a bulkhead enclosure, the bulkhead
enclosure shall comply with section R310.3. the net clear opening
dimensions required by this section shall be obtained by the normal
operation of the window or door opening from the inside. Escape and
rescue window openings with a finished sill height below the adjacent
ground elevation shall be provided with a window well in accordance
with Section R310.2.

R310.1.1 Minimum opening area. All emergency escape and rescue
openings shall have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet.

R310.1.2 Minimum opening height. The minimum net clear opening height
shall be 24 inches.

R310.1.3 Minimum opening width. The minimum net clear opening width
shall be 20 inches.

R310.1.4 Operational constraints. emergency escape and rescue openings
shall be operational from the inside of the room without the use of
keys or tools.

R310.2 Window wells. Window wells required for emergency escape and
rescue shall have horizontal dimensions that allow the door or window
of the emergency escape and rescue opening to be fully opened. The
horizontal dimensions of the window well shall provide a minimum net
clear area of 9 square feet with a minimum horizontal projection and
width of 36 inches.

Exception: The ladder or steps required by Section R310.2.1 shall be
permitted to encroach a maximum of 6 inches into the required
dimensions of the window well.

R310.2.1 Ladder and steps. Window wells with a vertical depth greater
than 44 inches below the adjacent ground level shall be equipped with
a permanently affixed ladder or steps usable with the window in the
fully open position. Ladders or steps required by this section shall
not be required to comply with Sections R314 and R315. Ladders or
rungs shall have an inside width of at least 12 inches, shall project
at least 3 inches from the wall and shall be spaced not more than 18
inches on center vertically for the full height of the window well.

R310.3 Bulkhead enclosures. Bulkhead enclosures shall provide direct
access to the basement. The bulkhead enclosure with the door panels in
fully open position shall provide the minimum net clear opening
required by Section R310.1.1. Bulkhead enclosures shall also com;y
with Section R314.9.

R310.4 Bars, grills, covers and screens. Bars, grills, covers, screens
or similar devices are permitted to be placed over emergency escape
and rescue openings, bulkhead enclosures, or window wells that serve
such openings, provided the minimum net clear opening size complies
with Sections R310.1.1 to R310.1.3, and such devices shall be
releasable or removable from the inside without the use of a key, tool
or force greater than that which is required for normal operation of
the escape and rescue opening.



  #9   Report Post  
Tim Scott
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows

I think it will. When adding the egress you turn the basement into "livable
space" and thus can be claimed as square footage when reselling the house.

Tim




"Michael" wrote in message
...
Hello,

I am considering putting in a basement bedroom which requires a larger
window. Does it make financial sense to do this? Will I ever see return
on the expense?

Mike





"Tom Baker" wrote in message
om...
"charlie hagen" wrote in message

k.net...
Hello,

My wife is having me look into finishing our basement. One thing she

wants
is a guest room. The basement windows that exist now are way too

small
and
I'm checking out egress windows. So, having no experience replacing
windows, but lots of experience do-it-myselfing, I have a couple of
questions:

1. what's the diff between the 'egress windows' I read about in

basement
remodeling articles/books and regular casement windows? I'm not

finding
much information at the local mega-home-improvement-shop.

2. Should I be looking for anything special in selecting a window for

this
purpose?

and,

3. Any recomendations from the general viewing audience?

Thanks,

chuck


There are several "model codes", and you do have to check with your
local building official to confirm local requirements. Here are
sections from the International Residential Code ( IRC ) 2000 which
should give at least a good idea of the code issues involved.

Section R310 Emergency Escape and Rescue Openings.
R310.1 Emergency escape and rescue required. Basements with habitable
space and every sleeping room shall have at least one openable
emergency escape and rescue window or exterior door opening for
emergency escape and rescue. Where openings are provided as a means of
escape and rescue they shall have a sill height of not more than 44
inches above the floor. Where a door opening having a threshold below
the adjacent ground elevation serves as an emergency escape and rescue
opening and is provided with a bulkhead enclosure, the bulkhead
enclosure shall comply with section R310.3. the net clear opening
dimensions required by this section shall be obtained by the normal
operation of the window or door opening from the inside. Escape and
rescue window openings with a finished sill height below the adjacent
ground elevation shall be provided with a window well in accordance
with Section R310.2.

R310.1.1 Minimum opening area. All emergency escape and rescue
openings shall have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet.

R310.1.2 Minimum opening height. The minimum net clear opening height
shall be 24 inches.

R310.1.3 Minimum opening width. The minimum net clear opening width
shall be 20 inches.

R310.1.4 Operational constraints. emergency escape and rescue openings
shall be operational from the inside of the room without the use of
keys or tools.

R310.2 Window wells. Window wells required for emergency escape and
rescue shall have horizontal dimensions that allow the door or window
of the emergency escape and rescue opening to be fully opened. The
horizontal dimensions of the window well shall provide a minimum net
clear area of 9 square feet with a minimum horizontal projection and
width of 36 inches.

Exception: The ladder or steps required by Section R310.2.1 shall be
permitted to encroach a maximum of 6 inches into the required
dimensions of the window well.

R310.2.1 Ladder and steps. Window wells with a vertical depth greater
than 44 inches below the adjacent ground level shall be equipped with
a permanently affixed ladder or steps usable with the window in the
fully open position. Ladders or steps required by this section shall
not be required to comply with Sections R314 and R315. Ladders or
rungs shall have an inside width of at least 12 inches, shall project
at least 3 inches from the wall and shall be spaced not more than 18
inches on center vertically for the full height of the window well.

R310.3 Bulkhead enclosures. Bulkhead enclosures shall provide direct
access to the basement. The bulkhead enclosure with the door panels in
fully open position shall provide the minimum net clear opening
required by Section R310.1.1. Bulkhead enclosures shall also com;y
with Section R314.9.

R310.4 Bars, grills, covers and screens. Bars, grills, covers, screens
or similar devices are permitted to be placed over emergency escape
and rescue openings, bulkhead enclosures, or window wells that serve
such openings, provided the minimum net clear opening size complies
with Sections R310.1.1 to R310.1.3, and such devices shall be
releasable or removable from the inside without the use of a key, tool
or force greater than that which is required for normal operation of
the escape and rescue opening.





  #10   Report Post  
user
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows

On Sun, 21 Mar 2004 22:29:17 GMT, Tim Scott wrote:
I think it will. When adding the egress you turn the basement into "livable
space" and thus can be claimed as square footage when reselling the house.


Uh, no. Around here in Upstate NY, at least, below-grade space is not counted,
even if it's code-compliant and inspected, as is mine. And that's according
to both my local building office and the realtors. At best you can advertise
it as having a "finished basement".

- Rich



  #11   Report Post  
Oldylocks
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows


"user" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 21 Mar 2004 22:29:17 GMT, Tim Scott

wrote:
I think it will. When adding the egress you turn the basement into

"livable
space" and thus can be claimed as square footage when reselling the

house.

Uh, no. Around here in Upstate NY, at least, below-grade space is not

counted,
even if it's code-compliant and inspected, as is mine. And that's

according
to both my local building office and the realtors. At best you can

advertise
it as having a "finished basement".

- Rich


Just a suggestion: Install a window that has good safety features. We
didn't and those are the windows that freak me out the most. Someone could
just hop down into them and take their time breaking in. I've since taken
care of it but wish I'd invested better.

It depends on the local code, but everyone knows even if code prohibits
listing below-grade space in the sq footage, your resell value will be
higher with a finished basement than without. Here, to be able to be listed
as a bedroom, a room must have its own closet, a closeable door, four or
more walls and an egress window. There are also dimensional
requirements...sq ft minimums and ceiling height.

Interestingly, all that's required for a space to be listed as a bathroom
here is that it have a toilet in it. I recently saw the smallest "bathroom"
in the world! Remember the toilets in kindergarten? Smaller than that.


  #12   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default 'egress' windows

Interestingly, all that's required for a space to be listed as a bathroom
here is that it have a toilet in it. I recently saw the smallest "bathroom"
in the world! Remember the toilets in kindergarten? Smaller than that.


And now there's a new japanese toilet with a built-in sink on the
cistern, so you only need the one unit. You can stuff the whole
thing into a 28" x 40" closet..

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