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Old January 16th 10, 02:23 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?

Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.

Any opinions would be most appreciated.

Smarty


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Old January 16th 10, 02:38 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Jan 15, 9:23*pm, "Smarty" wrote:
I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?

Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.

Any opinions would be most appreciated.

Smarty


Compared to sweated fittings they are bulky and expensive and ease of
installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA
compared to sweating copper.

Jimmie
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Old January 16th 10, 03:26 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 18:38:07 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE
wrote:

On Jan 15, 9:23*pm, "Smarty" wrote:
I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?

Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.

Any opinions would be most appreciated.

Smarty


Compared to sweated fittings they are bulky and expensive and ease of
installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA
compared to sweating copper.


Tell me a situation where a sharkbite is a PITA compared to sweating
copper.

I only have 2 in my house in a spot where I didn't feel like sweating
a couple of joints because they were hard to get to & surrounded by
flammables. Haven't leaked yet- 3yrs or so.

They *are* expensive, they *are* bulky. But harder than sweating? I
don't see it.

Jim
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Old January 16th 10, 03:48 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Sat, 16 Jan 2010 02:23:44 +0000 (UTC), "Smarty"
wrote:

I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?

Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.

Any opinions would be most appreciated.

Smarty



They can make a plumbing job go fast. Sharkbite fittings are amazing.
I used them during a water tank install and expansion tank a year ago
and they never leaked.
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Old January 16th 10, 03:50 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?


Smarty wrote:

I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?

Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.

Any opinions would be most appreciated.

Smarty


The Sharkbite fittings are very much like the push lock air fittings
that have been used for industrial pneumatic stuff for a long time, so I
would expect the reliability is good as long as the O ring material was
properly selected.


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Old January 16th 10, 01:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Jan 15, 10:50*pm, "Pete C." wrote:
Smarty wrote:

I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?


Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.


Any opinions would be most appreciated.


Smarty


The Sharkbite fittings are very much like the push lock air fittings
that have been used for industrial pneumatic stuff for a long time, so I
would expect the reliability is good as long as the O ring material was
properly selected.


I'd say that comparing air fittings and water fittings and concluding
that because something works in one application it means it's OK for
the other is a little like saying that an O ring that's good for a
toilet is OK to use to seal the space shuttle fuel tanks. Until I
see 20+ years of actual field use, I'd use them where really
necessary, but not conclude they are a reliable solution to use
everywhere.
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Old January 16th 10, 05:22 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Jan 16, 4:37*am, wrote:
On Jan 15, 10:50*pm, "Pete C." wrote:



Smarty wrote:


I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?


Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.


Any opinions would be most appreciated.


Smarty


The Sharkbite fittings are very much like the push lock air fittings
that have been used for industrial pneumatic stuff for a long time, so I
would expect the reliability is good as long as the O ring material was
properly selected.


I'd say that comparing air fittings and water fittings and concluding
that because something works in one application it means it's OK for
the other is a little like saying that an O ring that's good for a
toilet is OK to use to seal the space shuttle fuel tanks. * *Until I
see 20+ years of actual field use, I'd use them where really
necessary, but not conclude they are a reliable solution to use
everywhere.


We have used them on various camp units on Alaska's North Slope.
These units are connected/disconnected twice a year for the drilling
season. We are talking about 40ft Connex's that have been converted
into sleeping/dining modules. The temps range from sometimes 70 F in
the summer to well below -50 in the winter. These fittings are
wonderful. After a couple three connects/disconnect cycles they need
replaced, but for a home user they would be ideal. They can handle
(if memory serves) around 200 psi and the hottest water your water
heater can make.

Two thumbs up!!
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Old January 16th 10, 07:37 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Jan 15, 10:26*pm, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 18:38:07 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE



wrote:
On Jan 15, 9:23*pm, "Smarty" wrote:
I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?


Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.


Any opinions would be most appreciated.


Smarty


Compared to sweated fittings they are bulky and expensive and ease of
installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA
compared to sweating copper.


Tell me a situation where a sharkbite is a PITA compared to sweating
copper. * * *

I only have 2 in my house in a spot where I didn't feel like sweating
a couple of joints because they were hard to get to & surrounded by
flammables. * * Haven't leaked yet- 3yrs or so.

They *are* expensive, they *are* bulky. * *But harder than sweating? I
don't see it.

Jim


Just didn't have room to fit them in as we both agree they are bulky.
You must think sweating Cu pipe is more difficult than I do. Fact is I
kind of enjoy doing it.

Jimmie
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Old January 16th 10, 10:13 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Sat, 16 Jan 2010 11:37:12 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE
wrote:

On Jan 15, 10:26*pm, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 18:38:07 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE



wrote:
On Jan 15, 9:23*pm, "Smarty" wrote:
I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?


Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.


Any opinions would be most appreciated.


Smarty


Compared to sweated fittings they are bulky and expensive and ease of
installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA
compared to sweating copper.


Tell me a situation where a sharkbite is a PITA compared to sweating
copper. * * *

I only have 2 in my house in a spot where I didn't feel like sweating
a couple of joints because they were hard to get to & surrounded by
flammables. * * Haven't leaked yet- 3yrs or so.

They *are* expensive, they *are* bulky. * *But harder than sweating? I
don't see it.

Jim


Just didn't have room to fit them in as we both agree they are bulky.
You must think sweating Cu pipe is more difficult than I do. Fact is I
kind of enjoy doing it.

Jimmie

Try doing it above and behind a roughly 8"X14" heating duct3 inches
from a2X4 .The duct is4 inches from the concrete wall that the 2X4
wall framing is set against. The only possible options were a
Sharkbite type connection or soft drawn copper tube - and the
sharkbite was a lot easier and neater installation.

I don't mind sweating copper pipe either, when you can reach it, but
it would have required dropping the entire forced air heating duct
system and re-installing it - which would have required removing
another whole wall as well.
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Old January 16th 10, 10:39 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Sharkbite plumbing fittings - a bad idea?

On Jan 16, 2:37*pm, JIMMIE wrote:
On Jan 15, 10:26*pm, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 18:38:07 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE
wrote:
On Jan 15, 9:23*pm, "Smarty" wrote:


I am wondering whether there are any reasons to NOT use Sharkbite
push-fit plumbing fittings other than their relatively high cost?


Rather than sweat soldering, they seem like a really attractive and
very fast way to install copper plumbing without use of a torch or
solder. I am especially curious to know if they are holding up well,
and are as good as they appear on paper.


Any opinions would be most appreciated.


Compared to sweated fittings they are bulky and expensive and ease of
installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA
compared to sweating copper.


Tell me a situation where a sharkbite is a PITA compared to sweating
copper. * * *


I only have 2 in my house in a spot where I didn't feel like sweating
a couple of joints because they were hard to get to & surrounded by
flammables. * * Haven't leaked yet- 3yrs or so.


They *are* expensive, they *are* bulky. * *But harder than sweating? I
don't see it.



Just didn't have room to fit them in as we both agree they are bulky.
You must think sweating Cu pipe is more difficult than I do. Fact is I
kind of enjoy doing it.


Your taking pleasure in sweating has nothing to do with the OP's
question and is entirely besides the fact. Your opinion that
installation may range from not that much easier to a real PITA
compared to sweating copper.

indicates you have never used them.

Sharkbite's are much faster than sweating, even if you're geared up to
sweat and have a bunch to do. A Sharkbite fitting takes about as much
time to install as cleaning a copper fitting joint. The ability to
use a Sharkbite fitting on copper, PEX or PVC, coupled with their ease
of installation, far outweighs the cost premium.

R


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