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Default About all that latex paint...

I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted.
Opening the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the
surface. With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove
the largest ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface.
Can latex paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint
strainer? Is there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck


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On Sun, 8 Apr 2007 16:21:02 -0400, "C & E"
wrote:

I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted.
Opening the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the
surface. With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove
the largest ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface.
Can latex paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint
strainer? Is there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck


Panty hose, cheese cloth? Or get a cloth strainer (1 or 5 gallon size)
from HD. Strain away.
--
Oren

"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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Default About all that latex paint...

Strain with cheesecloth or filter paper into a fresh can. All available at
HD or Lowes


"C & E" wrote in message
...
I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck



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Default About all that latex paint...

Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head, folks.


"C & E" wrote in message
...
I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck



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Default About all that latex paint...


"Art" wrote in message
rthlink.net...
Strain with cheesecloth or filter paper into a fresh can. All available
at HD or Lowes


Both sell one gallon and five gallon size strainer nets. They have an
elastic around them, and look like a small pillow case. I use them with a
rubber band to siphon from a five gallon bucket when doing airless spray.
Cheap, cheap, cheap. Buy five of each next time, or if you're cheap, rinse
them out, and use them again. And while you are there, buy three or five of
each of the meshes of the paper filters, too. Saves a lot of time when
painting by not having to pick out the boogers, or try to get them off the
wall once deposited by a brush or roller. These are some of the simplest
cheapest tools in a painter's box.

And get some Floetrol, too. That will make that thickened paint run
smoothly again. Mix thoroughly. Be careful not to add too much. Makes
paint glide on like silk with no brush marks.

Steve




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Default About all that latex paint...

On Apr 8, 10:53 pm, "C & E" wrote:
Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head, folks.

"C & E" wrote in . ..



I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Trick of the trade (even though I'm not a painter).....store your
paint cans upside down!!!! You will NEVER get the rust/crud forming
around the rim! Its a trick I learned years ago and paint now lasts
10x longer than before. The reason it works is because no matter how
tight you reset the lid, air seeps in and out over time when your
store cans right-side up. By turning the can upside down, no air can
get into the can. Try it....it works!

--Jeff



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Default About all that latex paint...

On Sun, 8 Apr 2007 22:53:33 -0400, "C & E"
wrote:

Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head, folks.


The box is a tight space, huh?



"C & E" wrote in message
...
I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck


--
Oren

"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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Default About all that latex paint...

On 9 Apr 2007 06:40:56 -0700, "JB" wrote:

On Apr 8, 10:53 pm, "C & E" wrote:
Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head, folks.

"C & E" wrote in . ..



I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Trick of the trade (even though I'm not a painter).....store your
paint cans upside down!!!! You will NEVER get the rust/crud forming
around the rim! Its a trick I learned years ago and paint now lasts
10x longer than before. The reason it works is because no matter how
tight you reset the lid, air seeps in and out over time when your
store cans right-side up. By turning the can upside down, no air can
get into the can. Try it....it works!

--Jeff



One tip I've read was to place a few golf balls in the partially empty
can. This will raise the paint level, voiding space for moisture in
the can - hence preventing rust.
--
Oren

"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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Default About all that latex paint...

On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 13:57:43 -0700, Oren wrote:

On 9 Apr 2007 06:40:56 -0700, "JB" wrote:

On Apr 8, 10:53 pm, "C & E" wrote:
Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head, folks.

"C & E" wrote in . ..



I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Trick of the trade (even though I'm not a painter).....store your
paint cans upside down!!!! You will NEVER get the rust/crud forming
around the rim! Its a trick I learned years ago and paint now lasts
10x longer than before. The reason it works is because no matter how
tight you reset the lid, air seeps in and out over time when your
store cans right-side up. By turning the can upside down, no air can
get into the can. Try it....it works!

--Jeff



One tip I've read was to place a few golf balls in the partially empty
can. This will raise the paint level, voiding space for moisture in
the can - hence preventing rust.


I used to put a double sheet of plastic wrap over the can before
firmly closing lid on top of plastic.

It helps some, but I'm with OP who stores cans upside down; that's
what I'm doing now. Just make damn sure can is firmly closed, or
you'll have an icky-sticky pool of paint!


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Default About all that latex paint...

On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 13:57:43 -0700, Oren wrote:




One tip I've read was to place a few golf balls in the partially empty
can. This will raise the paint level, voiding space for moisture in
the can - hence preventing rust.


And it got rid of my slice.


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Default About all that latex paint...

On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 16:09:50 -0700, aspasia wrote:

On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 13:57:43 -0700, Oren wrote:

On 9 Apr 2007 06:40:56 -0700, "JB" wrote:

On Apr 8, 10:53 pm, "C & E" wrote:
Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head, folks.

"C & E" wrote in . ..



I just opened a one year old can of latex paint with 2/3 of the galllon
still remaining and, just as had feared, the inner rim had rusted. Opening
the can had deposited a thousand little flakes of rust on the surface.
With a tip of a rag I dabbed the surface and was able to remove the largest
ones but the littlest of the devils sunk beneath the surface. Can latex
paint be strained or is it too thick to pass through a paint strainer? Is
there a better way to do this?
TIA,
Chuck- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Trick of the trade (even though I'm not a painter).....store your
paint cans upside down!!!! You will NEVER get the rust/crud forming
around the rim! Its a trick I learned years ago and paint now lasts
10x longer than before. The reason it works is because no matter how
tight you reset the lid, air seeps in and out over time when your
store cans right-side up. By turning the can upside down, no air can
get into the can. Try it....it works!

--Jeff



One tip I've read was to place a few golf balls in the partially empty
can. This will raise the paint level, voiding space for moisture in
the can - hence preventing rust.


I used to put a double sheet of plastic wrap over the can before
firmly closing lid on top of plastic.

It helps some, but I'm with OP who stores cans upside down; that's
what I'm doing now. Just make damn sure can is firmly closed, or
you'll have an icky-sticky pool of paint!


I follow you. Had one leak upside down. Mine are still up-right for
now.
--
Oren

"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 20:05:21 -0400, mm
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 13:57:43 -0700, Oren wrote:




One tip I've read was to place a few golf balls in the partially empty
can. This will raise the paint level, voiding space for moisture in
the can - hence preventing rust.


And it got rid of my slice.


You mean rust? Balls are expensive............
--
Oren

"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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Default About all that latex paint...

Oren wrote:
On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 20:05:21 -0400, mm
wrote:


On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 13:57:43 -0700, Oren wrote:



One tip I've read was to place a few golf balls in the partially empty
can. This will raise the paint level, voiding space for moisture in
the can - hence preventing rust.


And it got rid of my slice.



You mean rust? Balls are expensive............
--
Oren

"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."


I suppose clean gravel would work just as well, and I have plenty of
that laying around...

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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"Oren" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 8 Apr 2007 22:53:33 -0400, "C & E"
wrote:

Doh!! Cheesecloth - of course! Thanks for the slap upside the head,
folks.


The box is a tight space, huh?


Boy, you've got that right!!


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