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Old July 3rd 06, 06:09 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?

We believe the seller of the house we have had a disposal but there is
none in the sink now. Are there negatives or pitfalls combining the
two? Our son and DIL have the combination and haven't reported
problems but I guess a "second opinion" could benefit us. Thoughts
welcomed.

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Old July 3rd 06, 09:06 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?


queried:
We believe the seller of the house we have had a disposal but there is
none in the sink now. Are there negatives or pitfalls combining the
two? Our son and DIL have the combination and haven't reported
problems but I guess a "second opinion" could benefit us. Thoughts
welcomed.


A garbage disposal on a septic system is not recommended - IMHO. The thing
that kills septic systems & leach fields is solids, why would you want to
add more to the system? I'd also stay away from bleach, any strong
chemicals, fats, grease, hair, etc. Pump and inspect the tank (and baffles)
at least every other year.

That's just my 2 cents though.....


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Old July 3rd 06, 09:21 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?


http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/pubs/mt9403.html


P.S. On that page:

Table 1 lists how often you need to pump out your tank on average,
given the size of the tank and the number of persons living in the
household. These figures were calculated assuming there was no garbage
disposal unit hooked up to the system. The use of a kitchen garbage
disposal will increase the amount of solids in the holding tank by as
much as 50 percent.

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Old July 3rd 06, 09:49 PM posted to alt.home.repair
Bob Bob is offline
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?


wrote:

The use of a kitchen garbage disposal will increase the amount of solids
in the holding tank by as much as 50 percent.


The last time I had my tank pumped, the service tech said the #1 solid
problem was sanitary napkins. Food from a disposal will dissolve over
time, but those things float forever.
Bob



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Old July 3rd 06, 10:56 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?

I've had a septic system for years (recently got annexed so now on city
sewer), and used a garbage disposal without problems. Of course, with
only two people living in a house built for five, the septic system had
plenty over overcapacity.

I'd just be careful what you dispose. Food scraps are probably OK. The
main thing is to make sure you don't kill the bacteria that break down
the solids. A garbage disposal is probably less harmful than a bottle
of bleach. Just keep it within reasonable proportions.

HTH.

wrote:
We believe the seller of the house we have had a disposal but there is
none in the sink now. Are there negatives or pitfalls combining the
two? Our son and DIL have the combination and haven't reported
problems but I guess a "second opinion" could benefit us. Thoughts
welcomed.


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Old July 3rd 06, 10:57 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?

I've had a septic system for years (recently got annexed so now on city
sewer), and used a garbage disposal without problems. Of course, with
only two people living in a house built for five, the septic system had
plenty over overcapacity.

I'd just be careful what you dispose. Food scraps are probably OK. The
main thing is to make sure you don't kill the bacteria that break down
the solids. A garbage disposal is probably less harmful than a bottle
of bleach. Just keep it within reasonable proportions.

HTH.

wrote:
We believe the seller of the house we have had a disposal but there is
none in the sink now. Are there negatives or pitfalls combining the
two? Our son and DIL have the combination and haven't reported
problems but I guess a "second opinion" could benefit us. Thoughts
welcomed.


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Old July 4th 06, 08:26 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?


blathered on about

http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/pubs/mt9403.html


P.S. On that page:

Table 1 lists how often you need to pump out your tank on average,
given the size of the tank and the number of persons living in the
household. These figures were calculated assuming there was no garbage
disposal unit hooked up to the system. The use of a kitchen garbage
disposal will increase the amount of solids in the holding tank by as
much as 50 percent.


I rest my case.......


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Old July 4th 06, 09:02 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default Disposals compatible with septic systems?

Oh pshaw, on Mon 03 Jul 2006 10:09:40a, meant to say...

We believe the seller of the house we have had a disposal but there is
none in the sink now. Are there negatives or pitfalls combining the
two? Our son and DIL have the combination and haven't reported
problems but I guess a "second opinion" could benefit us. Thoughts
welcomed.


It *can* be a problem, but the problem can be minimized. First off,
InSinkErator makes a model specifically for use with septic systems that
injects a solution to help break down the food while grinding.

http://www.insinkerator.com/isejsp/p...5&template=hhd

Second, it's best to stick with grinding soft food waste only; e.g.,
vegetables, fruits, cooked meats, etc. Avoid bones and highly fibrous
materials like corn husks, pineapple leaves and peels.

Avoid other materials like paper products. It's amazing how many people
put paper towels down their disposers.

We have never lived in a house with a septic system, but will soon be
moving to one. We plan on installing one of the InSinkErator models
mentioned above.

--
Wayne Boatwright @@
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