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Old May 18th 05, 05:03 PM
Matt
 
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Default removing lime stains from a concrete floor

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?

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Old May 18th 05, 05:27 PM
G Henslee
 
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Default

Matt wrote:
My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?


Phosphoric acid.
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Old May 18th 05, 05:52 PM
Gideon
 
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This is one of the reasons why people should be very cautious
when taking advise from newsgroups:
1) Phosphoric acid is the principal ingredient in
some versions of Lime Away, which means
that you are suggesting that he use Lime Away
instead of Lime Away.
2) Phosphoric acid is one of the chemicals used for
etching (eating) concrete. Duh.



G Henslee wrote in message ...
Matt wrote:
My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?


Phosphoric acid.






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Old May 18th 05, 06:08 PM
G Henslee
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Gideon wrote:




G Henslee wrote in message ...
Matt wrote:

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?



Phosphoric acid.


'helpful' top posting corrected


This is one of the reasons why people should be very cautious
when taking advise from newsgroups:
1) Phosphoric acid is the principal ingredient in
some versions of Lime Away, which means
that you are suggesting that he use Lime Away
instead of Lime Away.
2) Phosphoric acid is one of the chemicals used for
etching (eating) concrete. Duh.


Clean it, rinse it. Duh. Phosphoric should be considered before
muriatic for grout or concrete cleaning because it is LESS harmful.
Duh. Get real. Duh. Easiest and safest for the OP to just use the
Lime Away. Duh.
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Old May 18th 05, 06:15 PM
Matt
 
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Default

Gideon wrote:
This is one of the reasons why people should be very cautious
when taking advise from newsgroups:
1) Phosphoric acid is the principal ingredient in
some versions of Lime Away, which means
that you are suggesting that he use Lime Away
instead of Lime Away.
2) Phosphoric acid is one of the chemicals used for
etching (eating) concrete. Duh.



G Henslee wrote in message ...
Matt wrote:

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?



Phosphoric acid.


I have seen phosphoric eat holes in concrete floors.



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Old May 18th 05, 06:21 PM
Goedjn
 
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Default

On Wed, 18 May 2005 16:03:33 GMT, Matt
wrote:

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?


ANything that attacks the lime stains is going to attack the floor
too... Do it it small increments, or use sandpaper on it and
then paint.

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Old May 18th 05, 06:26 PM
Doug Miller
 
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Default

In article , Matt wrote:
My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?


Try scrubbing with white vinegar first. If that doesn't do the trick, I think
I'd give citric acid a try before moving up to anything stronger.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt.
And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Old May 18th 05, 06:27 PM
G Henslee
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Matt wrote:
Gideon wrote:

This is one of the reasons why people should be very cautious
when taking advise from newsgroups:
1) Phosphoric acid is the principal ingredient in
some versions of Lime Away, which means
that you are suggesting that he use Lime Away
instead of Lime Away.
2) Phosphoric acid is one of the chemicals used for
etching (eating) concrete. Duh.



G Henslee wrote in message ...
Matt wrote:

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?




Phosphoric acid.



I have seen phosphoric eat holes in concrete floors.


Yeah, so? I've seen what it does to human teeth left in a glass of cola
before too. bfd. What do *you* suggest genius?

The OP's not going to get that efflouresence/lime staining cleaned up
off of the concrete without a product that's going to etch, yes ETCH the
concrete *SLIGHTLY*. That's a fact and that's reality. That's not to say
he'll have holes in his slab or pits in it as you and the other dimwit
would have him believe. Phosphoric used properly or in pre-mixed
products such as Lime Away will clean the concrete and not harm it, and
with less potential harm than muriatic or other acid cleaners.

Like the other dimwit you're quick to reply with no advice. Get real. Duh.

-end of subject-
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Old May 18th 05, 06:56 PM
Gideon
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yep.

=======


Matt wrote in message ...
Gideon wrote:
This is one of the reasons why people should be very cautious
when taking advise from newsgroups:
1) Phosphoric acid is the principal ingredient in
some versions of Lime Away, which means
that you are suggesting that he use Lime Away
instead of Lime Away.
2) Phosphoric acid is one of the chemicals used for
etching (eating) concrete. Duh.



G Henslee wrote in message ...
Matt wrote:

My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?



Phosphoric acid.


I have seen phosphoric eat holes in concrete floors.



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Old May 18th 05, 07:06 PM
Gideon
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Doug,

Your advise is very sound.

Both citric acid and vinegar are good suggests - slower but safer
than other methods. The fundamental problem is the fact that the
acids which will attack calcium or magnesium deposits will generally
also attack the concrete. I'd follow your advise and use something
mild and accelerate its action with a brush, followed by a good rinse.

Of course, a painted floor with good paint-concrete adhesion will greatly
mitigate the danger of concrete etching. Hopefully the OP has a well
painted floor, in which case he has little concern.

Gideon


Doug Miller wrote in message ...
In article , Matt
wrote:
My water softener has leaked hard water very slowly for some years.

That made the floor damp and caused a buildup of lime on the concrete
floor. The lime is probably not more than quarter millimeter thick but
is unsightly.

My impulse is to use Lime Away, but I expect that that would attack the
cement in the floor.

Is there any good way to get rid of these lime stains?


Try scrubbing with white vinegar first. If that doesn't do the trick, I think
I'd give citric acid a try before moving up to anything stronger.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt.
And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?




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