Electronics (alt.electronics)

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Old March 15th 06, 11:39 PM posted to alt.electronics
GuitarPsych
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

I have a very simple circuit that I run an electric guitar signal
through and I'm thinking of modifying it from a 1.5 V battery to a 9V
battery. What modifications do I need to do to the circuit? (I am
obviously a beginner).

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Old March 16th 06, 01:03 AM posted to alt.electronics
JeffM
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

...modifying it from a 1.5 V battery to a 9V battery.
GuitarPsych


Seems like a dumb idea. A cell is much cheaper than a battery.
What advantage could there possibly be?

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Old March 16th 06, 04:20 AM posted to alt.electronics
GuitarPsych
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

These are reasons just off the top of my head:

1) To go through the process just to learn.

2) To standardize all my effects pedals so I only have to carry 1 type
of extra battery, therefore minimizing carrying space and weight and
minimizing the chance I will be out of the one I need.

3) The standardization will also eventually allow me to work on a
project that allows all my pedals to run on a power supply that accepts
multiple pedals. The power supply works with pedals expecting 9V. I am
unclear if it would work with pedals expecting 1.5 V... I have my
doubts, therefore the conversion project.

4) The 1 AA battery dies quickly.

JeffM wrote:
...modifying it from a 1.5 V battery to a 9V battery.
GuitarPsych



Seems like a dumb idea. A cell is much cheaper than a battery.
What advantage could there possibly be?

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Old March 16th 06, 07:47 AM posted to alt.electronics
Jasen Betts
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

On 2006-03-15, GuitarPsych wrote:

I have a very simple circuit that I run an electric guitar signal
through and I'm thinking of modifying it from a 1.5 V battery to a 9V
battery.


What modifications do I need to do to the circuit?


the easiest modification would be to modify the power input to reduce the
voltage to 1.5V, but all that will do is increase your battery bill.

(I am obviously a beginner).


why are you wanting to modify it?

--

Bye.
Jasen
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Old March 16th 06, 09:13 AM posted to alt.electronics
Jasen Betts
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

On 2006-03-16, GuitarPsych wrote:
These are reasons just off the top of my head:


1) To go through the process just to learn.


this Is a good reason

2) To standardize all my effects pedals so I only have to carry 1 type
of extra battery, therefore minimizing carrying space and weight and
minimizing the chance I will be out of the one I need.


another good reason.

3) The standardization will also eventually allow me to work on a
project that allows all my pedals to run on a power supply that accepts
multiple pedals. The power supply works with pedals expecting 9V. I am
unclear if it would work with pedals expecting 1.5 V... I have my
doubts, therefore the conversion project.


this could prove more challenging than it seems at fiirst glance
often interconnected DC powered devices can't be powered in parallel
due to them using different signal ground potentials.

4) The 1 AA battery dies quickly.


the 9V typically contains less energy and costs many times as much
it will die faster, possibly much faster.

so that's two for and two agaist.

Bye.
Jasen


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Old March 16th 06, 08:02 PM posted to alt.electronics
GuitarPsych
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

I'd rather not make this about a debate as to whether it's a good idea
overall. I may in fact not actually do the conversion. Regardless, I
would just like to know how to go about doing it, IF I chose to.

Jasen Betts wrote:
On 2006-03-16, GuitarPsych wrote:

These are reasons just off the top of my head:



1) To go through the process just to learn.



this Is a good reason


2) To standardize all my effects pedals so I only have to carry 1 type
of extra battery, therefore minimizing carrying space and weight and
minimizing the chance I will be out of the one I need.



another good reason.


3) The standardization will also eventually allow me to work on a
project that allows all my pedals to run on a power supply that accepts
multiple pedals. The power supply works with pedals expecting 9V. I am
unclear if it would work with pedals expecting 1.5 V... I have my
doubts, therefore the conversion project.



this could prove more challenging than it seems at fiirst glance
often interconnected DC powered devices can't be powered in parallel
due to them using different signal ground potentials.


4) The 1 AA battery dies quickly.



the 9V typically contains less energy and costs many times as much
it will die faster, possibly much faster.

so that's two for and two agaist.

Bye.
Jasen

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Old March 17th 06, 08:21 AM posted to alt.electronics
Jasen Betts
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

On 2006-03-16, GuitarPsych wrote:
I'd rather not make this about a debate as to whether it's a good idea
overall. I may in fact not actually do the conversion. Regardless, I
would just like to know how to go about doing it, IF I chose to.


OK what you do is analyse the circuit and figure out how it works then
modify it to work from 9v. that or put some sort of voltage converter in
there.

Bye.
Jasen
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Old March 17th 06, 02:58 PM posted to alt.electronics
default
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 14:39:50 -0800, GuitarPsych wrote:

I have a very simple circuit that I run an electric guitar signal
through and I'm thinking of modifying it from a 1.5 V battery to a 9V
battery. What modifications do I need to do to the circuit? (I am
obviously a beginner).


If you plan to run your stuff on a power supply the 1.5 volt can be
met with one of the three terminal regulators to step down the voltage
from 9. I think the LM317 outputs something like 1.2 volts with no
adjustment resistors. Goggle for it and the data sheet will tell you
how to connect it and how to calculate the resistor to give the output
voltage you want.

Running it with a 9 volt battery will just waste a lot of power and
end up costing a lot more.

You could make a buck switching supply to lower the voltage
efficiently - but you're still talking about a more expensive battery
cost.

Going the other way, 1.5 to 9, makes more sense if size isn't a big
concern. Particularly if you can use D batteries.

There's a semi-obsolete IC designed to do just that - Part is the
TL496. Designed to take 1.5 or 3 volts and output 9 volts at 20-40
milliamps.

Someone was marketing a kit for the TL496 with all the parts and
circuit board to make a 9 volt battery eliminator.
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Old March 17th 06, 05:14 PM posted to alt.electronics
GuitarPsych
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

I can't tell if you are being sarcastic, but if not, all I can do is
again ask my original question. It is a very simple circuit, 9
resistors and 4 capacitors. I'm just wondering in general what
modifications I would need to do if, on the diagram it lists a 1.5V
battery and I want to use a 9V battery. Would I raise/lower the values
of certain resistors/capacitors? Would I need to do anything?

Jasen Betts wrote:
On 2006-03-16, GuitarPsych wrote:

I'd rather not make this about a debate as to whether it's a good idea
overall. I may in fact not actually do the conversion. Regardless, I
would just like to know how to go about doing it, IF I chose to.



OK what you do is analyse the circuit and figure out how it works then
modify it to work from 9v. that or put some sort of voltage converter in
there.

Bye.
Jasen

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Old March 17th 06, 05:22 PM posted to alt.electronics
GuitarPsych
 
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Default changing from 1.5V battery to 9V battery

I must be asking this question in a way that is throwing people off,
because there seems to be a lot of resistance to actually answer the
question. Let me try another way:

Let's say a friend of yours is in an electronics class and given a
simple circuit design, 9 resistors and 4 capacitors, with a 1.5V battery
power supply. The assignment is to test the circuit to see if it would
function if the battery power supply were changed to 9V. How would you
suggest to your friend to do that? What would they look at in the
circuit? And if something would need to be changed, what would it be?
Raising/lowering resistor/capacitor values? Adding/subtracting
resistors/capacitors? etc.

GuitarPsych wrote:

I have a very simple circuit that I run an electric guitar signal
through and I'm thinking of modifying it from a 1.5 V battery to a 9V
battery. What modifications do I need to do to the circuit? (I am
obviously a beginner).



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