Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old January 10th 19, 03:03 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair,rec.antiques.radio+phono
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Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MIC connector to BNC

Most of my vintage testers have those old style 5/8" screw on MIC
connectors. I have considered changing all of them to BNC and I see many
people do this, but I really dont feel like opening each tester to do
this, plus I kind of like keeping vintage gear original.

I have some probes with the MIC connectors, but there are times I'd like
to use a probe with a BNC on my vintage testers.

My idea is to simply make a few adaptors. I have several of the old MIC
connectors, and I have a bunch of the chassis mount BNC connectors
(which I believe is called the "female"). But I am not seeing any
INLINE female BNC connectors. If I could find these female INLINE ones,
I'd simply take a 6" piece of coax, and put the MIC connector on one end
and the BNC on the other. Making 2 or 3 of these should suffice.

Has anyone seen any female INLINE BNC connectors to buy?
Or, is there another method to accomplish this?

Yes, I could solder on the chassis type BNC connectors, but they would
lack shielding at the connector.


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Old January 10th 19, 11:49 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,rec.antiques.radio+phono
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Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MIC connector to BNC

If you don't mind buying from Chinese sellers and waiting a month or so
for delivery, Ebay item 113114727770 is what you're after if you don't
have the tooling for a crimp style connector (Ebay # 323326819341).
Or, you could get several of these (Ebay # 392106541719) with the BNC
already assembled onto the cable, Just cut off the banana plugs and
solder your mic connectors onto the cable.

Cheers,
Dave M


On Wed, 09 Jan 2019 20:03:29 -0600, wrote:

Most of my vintage testers have those old style 5/8" screw on MIC
connectors. I have considered changing all of them to BNC and I see many
people do this, but I really dont feel like opening each tester to do
this, plus I kind of like keeping vintage gear original.

I have some probes with the MIC connectors, but there are times I'd like
to use a probe with a BNC on my vintage testers.

My idea is to simply make a few adaptors. I have several of the old MIC
connectors, and I have a bunch of the chassis mount BNC connectors
(which I believe is called the "female"). But I am not seeing any
INLINE female BNC connectors. If I could find these female INLINE ones,
I'd simply take a 6" piece of coax, and put the MIC connector on one end
and the BNC on the other. Making 2 or 3 of these should suffice.

Has anyone seen any female INLINE BNC connectors to buy?
Or, is there another method to accomplish this?

Yes, I could solder on the chassis type BNC connectors, but they would
lack shielding at the connector.

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Old January 11th 19, 03:59 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,840
Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MICconnector to BNC

On Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 6:03:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
Most of my vintage testers have those old style 5/8" screw on MIC
connectors. I have considered changing all of them to BNC



Don't you want a UHF BNC adapter? Take a look at images.google.com with
that search string...

The UHF center socket takes a banana plug, so putting a ground banana compatible post
next to the coax connector can let you use a dual-banana-to-BNC as well.
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Old January 11th 19, 04:21 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair,rec.antiques.radio+phono
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 35
Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MICconnector to BNC

On Wed, 09 Jan 2019 20:03:29 -0600, tubeguy wrote:

Most of my vintage testers have those old style 5/8" screw on MIC
connectors. I have considered changing all of them to BNC and I see many
people do this, but I really dont feel like opening each tester to do
this, plus I kind of like keeping vintage gear original.

I have some probes with the MIC connectors, but there are times I'd like
to use a probe with a BNC on my vintage testers.

My idea is to simply make a few adaptors. I have several of the old MIC
connectors, and I have a bunch of the chassis mount BNC connectors
(which I believe is called the "female"). But I am not seeing any
INLINE female BNC connectors. If I could find these female INLINE ones,
I'd simply take a 6" piece of coax, and put the MIC connector on one end
and the BNC on the other. Making 2 or 3 of these should suffice.

Has anyone seen any female INLINE BNC connectors to buy?
Or, is there another method to accomplish this?

Yes, I could solder on the chassis type BNC connectors, but they would
lack shielding at the connector.


You can remove the spring from the mic connector and drill the opening
out enough to remove the plating. Then take a single hole style BNC
connector and file the threads down until it fits in the mic connector.
Solder a wire onto the center of the BNC and feed it through the hole in
the mic connector. Then solder the BNC into the back of the mic
connector and solder the center contact. That's how I made mine. It
avoids having to come up with an unusual size tap.

--
Jim Mueller

To get my real email address, replace wrongname with eggmen.
Then replace nospam with expressmail. Lastly, replace com with dk.


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Old January 11th 19, 04:24 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MICconnector to BNC

On 1/10/19 8:59 PM, whit3rd wrote:
On Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 6:03:44 PM UTC-8, wrote:
Most of my vintage testers have those old style 5/8" screw on MIC
connectors. I have considered changing all of them to BNC



Don't you want a UHF BNC adapter? Take a look at images.google.com with
that search string...

The UHF center socket takes a banana plug, so putting a ground banana compatible post
next to the coax connector can let you use a dual-banana-to-BNC as well.


Except....A UHF connector is 5/8-24 pitch.
The Amphenol button connector is 3/8-27 pitch.
Unless you consider cross threading a feature, they are not compatible.

--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com
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Old January 11th 19, 06:44 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair,rec.antiques.radio+phono
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2018
Posts: 23
Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MIC connector to BNC

On Fri, 11 Jan 2019 03:21:22 GMT, Jim Mueller
wrote:

On Wed, 09 Jan 2019 20:03:29 -0600, tubeguy wrote:

Most of my vintage testers have those old style 5/8" screw on MIC
connectors. I have considered changing all of them to BNC and I see many
people do this, but I really dont feel like opening each tester to do
this, plus I kind of like keeping vintage gear original.

I have some probes with the MIC connectors, but there are times I'd like
to use a probe with a BNC on my vintage testers.

My idea is to simply make a few adaptors. I have several of the old MIC
connectors, and I have a bunch of the chassis mount BNC connectors
(which I believe is called the "female"). But I am not seeing any
INLINE female BNC connectors. If I could find these female INLINE ones,
I'd simply take a 6" piece of coax, and put the MIC connector on one end
and the BNC on the other. Making 2 or 3 of these should suffice.

Has anyone seen any female INLINE BNC connectors to buy?
Or, is there another method to accomplish this?

Yes, I could solder on the chassis type BNC connectors, but they would
lack shielding at the connector.


You can remove the spring from the mic connector and drill the opening
out enough to remove the plating. Then take a single hole style BNC
connector and file the threads down until it fits in the mic connector.
Solder a wire onto the center of the BNC and feed it through the hole in
the mic connector. Then solder the BNC into the back of the mic
connector and solder the center contact. That's how I made mine. It
avoids having to come up with an unusual size tap.


I was holding both parts in hand and thinking about doing something like
that, except my thought was to epoxy the BNC into the Mic connector. (of
course making sure they fit tight so there is a good connection on the
ground side).

There have been lots of great suggestions in this thread!

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Old January 12th 19, 12:21 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,840
Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MICconnector to BNC

On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 7:24:54 PM UTC-8, Fox's Mercantile wrote:
On 1/10/19 8:59 PM, whit3rd wrote:


Don't you want a UHF BNC adapter? Take a look at images.google.com with
that search string...


Except....A UHF connector is 5/8-24 pitch.
The Amphenol button connector is 3/8-27 pitch.
Unless you consider cross threading a feature, they are not compatible.


Oh, then the 'easiest' solution I'm aware of is a pogo pin soldered in a BNC
fitting, and a lathe-job threaded tube, 3/8-27 to 38-32, to mate the threads.

I'm not sure I've ever encountered 3/8-27, but I have taps for 3/8-24./ -26. /-32
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Old January 12th 19, 12:37 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,840
Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MICconnector to BNC

On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 7:24:54 PM UTC-8, Fox's Mercantile wrote:

The Amphenol button connector is 3/8-27 pitch.


Is this about the connector depicted here https://archive.org/details/Amphenol/page/n5
at the top left of page M-6 ?
  #10   Report Post  
Old January 12th 19, 01:22 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair,rec.antiques.radio+phono
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2017
Posts: 252
Default Making an Adaptor from the vintage single wire 5/8" screw on MICconnector to BNC

On 1/11/19 5:37 PM, whit3rd wrote:
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 7:24:54 PM UTC-8, Fox's Mercantile wrote:

The Amphenol button connector is 3/8-27 pitch.


Is this about the connector depicted here https://archive.org/details/Amphenol/page/n5
at the top left of page M-6 ?


Yes.

5/8-27 Industry standard.

--
"I am a river to my people."
Jeff-1.0
WA6FWi
http:foxsmercantile.com


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