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Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS



 
 
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  #221  
Old February 17th 17, 04:44 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16,896
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 22:15:35 -0500, "J. Clarke"
wrote:

In article Rtmdnb7i4qyh3DvFnZ2dnUU7-
, says...

On 2/16/2017 11:04 AM, Jack wrote:
On 2/14/2017 8:12 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

On 2/13/2017 11:14 AM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

Not true with my exhaust system. The stainless steel exhaust has
never
once been cleaned and it is now 16+ years old, and in the rust belt.
Surely GM could have used the same stuff in the brake lines, which is
magnitudes more important than the exhaust system as far as safety
goes.

So you never go through a car wash?

Never, at least not with this truck.

And what pressure does your exhaust have to
withstand? What pressure do your brake lines
have to withstand?

The break lines have no problem withstanding pressure, until they RUST!

sigh

Never occurs to you that the stresses something
needs to withstand affect the choice of alloy to
be used, does it?

Of course, which is exactly why brake lines should be made from
stainless steel and not from crap that starts to rust 3 minutes after
installation.

As for the rest, why did you buy a GM product to
begin with?

At the time I didn't know I would be risking my life on substandard GM
breaking systems.


Chrysler does the same, steel, my BIL was driving his PU truck and went
to hit the brakes.... NOTHING.. the lines blew from rust.

Not sure how the Japanese cars treat their brake components.


If there were NO brakes then the system had been
neglected for a long time. Any car or light
truck sold in the US after 1976 is required to
have a split braking system that continues to
work with reduced capability with a brake line
completely missing. After a while you can pump
it dry but you have to pretty much be an idiot
to not notice that there's a brake problem
before that happens.

Impossible to pump it dry because it is a split reservoir too - but if
you blow the front system and the rear is out of adjustment (extremely
common - auto adjusters stuck and rear brakes not serviced - or
handbrake never used - required to operate the adjusters) and there is
not enough volume pumped from the bottomed rear piston to fully apply
the rear brakes. If you don't "brain freeze" and get a second pump in,
you have a chance to slow down, if not totally stop
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  #222  
Old February 17th 17, 05:19 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 853
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 2/16/2017 4:58 PM, Bill wrote:
Jack wrote:

Yet, they don't give a damn if your brake lines rot out, or ABS fires
off randomly, reducing braking distance in half... Cool beans....


It was my summation that they realize that it is not in their best
interest to build cars that "last forever". This situation seemed to
improve when some of the Asian competition started making them look bad.


Killing off their customers would not seem a good way to prevent cars
from lasting forever. Bumpers, rocker panels, quarter panels tailgate
cables etc. rusting out would seem a better way to go than brake
failure, at least to me...

I'm certainly not too worried about VW fudging a bit on the MPG, yet
they get fined a $Billion or so for that.

I think GM should be fined a few Billion for the faulty brake system on
their cars, and VW should just get mentioned on page 20 of the
Washington Post.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
http://jbstein.com
  #224  
Old February 17th 17, 05:40 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,171
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 2017-02-17, Jack wrote:

I should have said "I think you might be over thinging this" That would
have been a better "pun"


Ever notice how the punster is the only one who thinks his pun is
actually funny?

nb
  #226  
Old February 17th 17, 05:49 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 853
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 2/16/2017 10:39 PM, wrote:
On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 19:18:00 -0500, woodchucker
wrote:

On 2/16/2017 11:04 AM, Jack wrote:
On 2/14/2017 8:12 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

On 2/13/2017 11:14 AM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

Not true with my exhaust system. The stainless steel exhaust has
never
once been cleaned and it is now 16+ years old, and in the rust belt.
Surely GM could have used the same stuff in the brake lines, which is
magnitudes more important than the exhaust system as far as safety
goes.

So you never go through a car wash?

Never, at least not with this truck.

And what pressure does your exhaust have to
withstand? What pressure do your brake lines
have to withstand?

The break lines have no problem withstanding pressure, until they RUST!

sigh

Never occurs to you that the stresses something
needs to withstand affect the choice of alloy to
be used, does it?

Of course, which is exactly why brake lines should be made from
stainless steel and not from crap that starts to rust 3 minutes after
installation.

As for the rest, why did you buy a GM product to
begin with?

At the time I didn't know I would be risking my life on substandard GM
breaking systems.


Chrysler does the same, steel, my BIL was driving his PU truck and went
to hit the brakes.... NOTHING.. the lines blew from rust.

Not sure how the Japanese cars treat their brake components.

They fail too. The lines look perfect, but where they pass through
the clips that hold them to the chassis they rust through. A squirt of
"fluid film" at each clip twice a year will make them last forever.
Fuel lines too

Thy must not be made of stainless, as we now know how that rusts.

--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
http://jbstein.com
  #227  
Old February 17th 17, 05:57 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 853
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 2/16/2017 7:04 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

On 2/14/2017 8:12 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

On 2/13/2017 11:14 AM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

Not true with my exhaust system. The stainless steel exhaust has never
once been cleaned and it is now 16+ years old, and in the rust belt.
Surely GM could have used the same stuff in the brake lines, which is
magnitudes more important than the exhaust system as far as safety goes.

So you never go through a car wash?

Never, at least not with this truck.

And what pressure does your exhaust have to
withstand? What pressure do your brake lines
have to withstand?

The break lines have no problem withstanding pressure, until they RUST!

sigh

Never occurs to you that the stresses something
needs to withstand affect the choice of alloy to
be used, does it?


Of course, which is exactly why brake lines should be made from
stainless steel and not from crap that starts to rust 3 minutes after
installation.


Which specific alloy of stainless steel should
be used and why that alloy and not some other
alloy?


One that makes them not rust out. Your local stainless steel
manufacture will gladly help them out. I could tell them but no reason
on earth they can't find out from a better source.

Engineering is always a compromise.


Perhaps a few $Billion in fines would help them compromise on the side
of a safe braking system, rather than $billions for fudging on MPG...

(Posted at end of NUMEROUS lines of extraneous text to conform to
ignorance level of previous poster[s])
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
http://jbstein.com
  #228  
Old February 17th 17, 06:15 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 853
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 2/16/2017 10:15 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article Rtmdnb7i4qyh3DvFnZ2dnUU7-
, says...

On 2/16/2017 11:04 AM, Jack wrote:
On 2/14/2017 8:12 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

On 2/13/2017 11:14 AM, J. Clarke wrote:
In article ,
says...

Not true with my exhaust system. The stainless steel exhaust has
never
once been cleaned and it is now 16+ years old, and in the rust belt.
Surely GM could have used the same stuff in the brake lines, which is
magnitudes more important than the exhaust system as far as safety
goes.

So you never go through a car wash?

Never, at least not with this truck.

And what pressure does your exhaust have to
withstand? What pressure do your brake lines
have to withstand?

The break lines have no problem withstanding pressure, until they RUST!

sigh

Never occurs to you that the stresses something
needs to withstand affect the choice of alloy to
be used, does it?

Of course, which is exactly why brake lines should be made from
stainless steel and not from crap that starts to rust 3 minutes after
installation.

As for the rest, why did you buy a GM product to
begin with?

At the time I didn't know I would be risking my life on substandard GM
breaking systems.


Chrysler does the same, steel, my BIL was driving his PU truck and went
to hit the brakes.... NOTHING.. the lines blew from rust.

Not sure how the Japanese cars treat their brake components.


If there were NO brakes then the system had been
neglected for a long time. Any car or light
truck sold in the US after 1976 is required to
have a split braking system that continues to
work with reduced capability with a brake line
completely missing.


The first time my lines failed my SIL borrowed my truck to pick up a
load of granite block. He and my daughter backed out of the driveway,
and the pedal went down almost to the floor. He drove 40 miles 20 with
a heavy load and luckily got back, telling me my brakes sucked. I
checked and immediately knew half the brakes were gone, and it was
rusted brake lines.

$700 later all was well, I thought. Turns out the jerks at the garage
missed two lines and 3 months later, one of those burst. Luckily, I was
driving at night on a secluded road rather than in traffic. Breaking
distance with half a system works, but really poorly. I had forgot
something and hit my brakes to turn in a road to turn around, and
sailed right past it when the brakes semi failed. Had I been in traffic
things could have been bad...

After a while you can pump it dry but you have to pretty much be an
idiot to not notice that there's a brake problem before that happens.


I pretty much told my SIL the same thing.

Anyway, How can you pump it dry? The dual systems are isolated and to
pump them both dry you'd need a leak in both systems. While that could
happen, it would be highly unusual.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
http://jbstein.com
  #229  
Old February 17th 17, 06:48 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 656
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 17 Feb 2017 16:40:40 GMT, notbob wrote:

On 2017-02-17, Jack wrote:

I should have said "I think you might be over thinging this" That would
have been a better "pun"


Ever notice how the punster is the only one who thinks his pun is
actually funny?

Puns are rated upon the groan factor by me.
  #230  
Old February 17th 17, 07:11 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,882
Default Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS

On 2/17/2017 10:57 AM, Jack wrote:
Snip



Which specific alloy of stainless steel should
be used and why that alloy and not some other
alloy?


One that makes them not rust out. Your local stainless steel
manufacture will gladly help them out. I could tell them but no reason
on earth they can't find out from a better source.

Engineering is always a compromise.


Perhaps a few $Billion in fines would help them compromise on the side
of a safe braking system, rather than $billions for fudging on MPG...


Don't take this like I am ganging up on you. ;~)

A billion dollar fine for an auto manufacturer for a brake problem that
I was never aware of when I was in that business, service manager of an
Oldsmobile dealer. And this may actually be more common in recent years
but up until 1995 not really a thing except in isolated cases.

How about a billion dollar fine against all TS manufacturers that did
not care about our safety enough to build a safer saw when they had the
opportunity. I will give you the possibility that it may have been
expensive. But giving you that, the brand that out sells all others in
the USA pretty much is the most expensive saw in it's class.

Has anyone heard of someone that has been injured on a non SawStop TS?
Yeah....;~)
Has any one heard of some one that has been injured on a SawStop. Not
so far, by me.

 




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