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Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 7th 10, 07:22 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 11
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

Hello all

I've just had a loft conversion completed on a victorian semi. The
rear of the house is one large dormer with a (nearly) flat roof, and
we've left the chimney stack in place as we might use the dining room
fireplace one day.

The problem we have is that rain is getting in somewhere and coming
through the chimney breast plasterin the new loft room, but the roofer
can't work out where this is coming from.

Here is a picture of the plaster with a roll of masking tape for
scale. There are pencil lines around the damp circles as I was
measuring to see if they got bigger.
http://yfrog.com/7bixtj

Here are pictures from the outside:
http://yfrog.com/4vso3j
http://yfrog.com/6ds5mj

The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.

If it rains moderately for an hour, the patches appear/get worse and
then take a week or two to dry out. To me that looks like the water
is being funnelled down quite effectively.

Could it really be soaking in from the brick? What else could it be?

Thanks for your thoughts
Calum
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  #2  
Old June 7th 10, 08:01 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 4,814
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)


The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.

I'd replace all that mortar round the pots. The rain could either be
coming straight through it, or there are hairline cracks at the edges.
Either way, it's no big deal to replace it
  #3  
Old June 7th 10, 09:29 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 511
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

On Jun 7, 8:01 am, stuart noble wrote:
The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.


I'd replace all that mortar round the pots. The rain could either be
coming straight through it, or there are hairline cracks at the edges.
Either way, it's no big deal to replace it


me too defo. do the other pot as well - if neighbours spose you should
ask first....

Jim K
  #4  
Old June 7th 10, 10:16 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 59
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)


"Jim K" wrote in message
...
On Jun 7, 8:01 am, stuart noble wrote:
The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.


I'd replace all that mortar round the pots. The rain could either be
coming straight through it, or there are hairline cracks at the edges.
Either way, it's no big deal to replace it


me too defo. do the other pot as well - if neighbours spose you should
ask first....

Jim K


I personally don't like the look of the lead flashing, might be
worth checking for water pooling in that area.

I built a shed once, it fell down.

--
The man who smiles when things go wrong has
thought of someone to blame it on.

  #5  
Old June 7th 10, 10:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,167
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

Calum wrote:
Hello all

I've just had a loft conversion completed on a victorian semi. The
rear of the house is one large dormer with a (nearly) flat roof, and
we've left the chimney stack in place as we might use the dining room
fireplace one day.

The problem we have is that rain is getting in somewhere and coming
through the chimney breast plasterin the new loft room, but the roofer
can't work out where this is coming from.

Here is a picture of the plaster with a roll of masking tape for
scale. There are pencil lines around the damp circles as I was
measuring to see if they got bigger.
http://yfrog.com/7bixtj

Here are pictures from the outside:
http://yfrog.com/4vso3j
http://yfrog.com/6ds5mj

The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.

If it rains moderately for an hour, the patches appear/get worse and
then take a week or two to dry out. To me that looks like the water
is being funnelled down quite effectively.

Could it really be soaking in from the brick? What else could it be?


Bloody obvious.

You have a flat roof and **** all flashing on the stack.,


Go up and prise up the lead. Bet you its all wet underneath.


You need to take roofing felt an carry it up the sides of the stack, to
where the flashing starts, and probably mastic it in, then put in new
flashing and dress it several inches out along and over the roofing
felt. So that driving rain under the flashing has to go a long way and
then UP to the flashing top, before it meets the brick.

Yu might also, as others have suggested, at the same time repoint the
stack and remortar the cowl top.


Personally I would scaffold up, or whatever, and demolish the stack top,
and start again and build a new top, done properly.

I take it the flat roof is part of the new conversion? If so its been
badly done.

It should be redone in conjunction with the chimney.







Thanks for your thoughts
Calum

  #6  
Old June 7th 10, 11:11 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 511
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

On Jun 7, 10:58 am, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:
Calum wrote:
Hello all


I've just had a loft conversion completed on a victorian semi. The
rear of the house is one large dormer with a (nearly) flat roof, and
we've left the chimney stack in place as we might use the dining room
fireplace one day.


The problem we have is that rain is getting in somewhere and coming
through the chimney breast plasterin the new loft room, but the roofer
can't work out where this is coming from.


Here is a picture of the plaster with a roll of masking tape for
scale. There are pencil lines around the damp circles as I was
measuring to see if they got bigger.
http://yfrog.com/7bixtj


Here are pictures from the outside:
http://yfrog.com/4vso3j
http://yfrog.com/6ds5mj


The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.


If it rains moderately for an hour, the patches appear/get worse and
then take a week or two to dry out. To me that looks like the water
is being funnelled down quite effectively.


Could it really be soaking in from the brick? What else could it be?


Bloody obvious.

You have a flat roof and **** all flashing on the stack.,

Go up and prise up the lead. Bet you its all wet underneath.

You need to take roofing felt an carry it up the sides of the stack, to
where the flashing starts, and probably mastic it in, then put in new
flashing and dress it several inches out along and over the roofing
felt. So that driving rain under the flashing has to go a long way and
then UP to the flashing top, before it meets the brick.

Yu might also, as others have suggested, at the same time repoint the
stack and remortar the cowl top.

Personally I would scaffold up, or whatever, and demolish the stack top,
and start again and build a new top, done properly.

I take it the flat roof is part of the new conversion? If so its been
badly done.


care to expand - for the benefit of the OP?

Jim K
  #7  
Old June 7th 10, 11:16 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,335
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

Bloody obvious.

You have a flat roof and **** all flashing on the stack.,


Go up and prise up the lead. Bet you its all wet underneath.


You need to take roofing felt an carry it up the sides of the stack, to
where the flashing starts, and probably mastic it in, then put in new
flashing and dress it several inches out along and over the roofing
felt. So that driving rain under the flashing has to go a long way and
then UP to the flashing top, before it meets the brick.

Yu might also, as others have suggested, at the same time repoint the
stack and remortar the cowl top.


Personally I would scaffold up, or whatever, and demolish the stack top,
and start again and build a new top, done properly.

I take it the flat roof is part of the new conversion? If so its been
badly done.

It should be redone in conjunction with the chimney.




I'd go along with most of that, tho If it were me and it seems that the
water doesn't take that long to appear, I'd prolly chop a bit out of the
wall where damp and then try a hose at the bottom sides of the chimney
and see if thats where its at and if not the top, might just might show
up where its leaking...

But as its just been done why isn't the builder sorting this out?..

--
Tony Sayer

  #8  
Old June 7th 10, 12:03 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,061
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

In article ,
Calum writes:
Hello all

I've just had a loft conversion completed on a victorian semi. The
rear of the house is one large dormer with a (nearly) flat roof, and
we've left the chimney stack in place as we might use the dining room
fireplace one day.

The problem we have is that rain is getting in somewhere and coming
through the chimney breast plasterin the new loft room, but the roofer
can't work out where this is coming from.

Here is a picture of the plaster with a roll of masking tape for
scale. There are pencil lines around the damp circles as I was
measuring to see if they got bigger.
http://yfrog.com/7bixtj

Here are pictures from the outside:
http://yfrog.com/4vso3j
http://yfrog.com/6ds5mj

The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.

If it rains moderately for an hour, the patches appear/get worse and
then take a week or two to dry out. To me that looks like the water
is being funnelled down quite effectively.

Could it really be soaking in from the brick? What else could it be?


Difficult to tell.

I bought a couple of those elephant's foot cowls like the one you
have, decided they wouldn't reduce the amount of rainfall going
down the chimney, and took them back. Actually, they may make it
worse by capturing water from a larger area than the original pot
opening, and making it run down the inside of the pot - there's
nothing to make the water running down the outside of the pot
(unless you siliconed it on).
You could repeat the plastic bag test on this flue (but you can't
block the airflow permanently like this).

I then went a bought a couple of these instead:
http://www.brewercowls.co.uk/index.p...tent&Itemid=18
although I fixed them in a different way so the strap isn't visible
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1619546457
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1619546457

In theory, rain water going in the pot shouldn't cause any problems.
In practice it might because the internal pointing has been washed
away over the years of rain exposure without any heating to dry it.
Also, if the flue isn't ventilated at bottom _and_ top, it will fill
up with condensation, which will soak through the brickwork in time.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #9  
Old June 7th 10, 12:05 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,167
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

Jim K wrote:
On Jun 7, 10:58 am, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:
Calum wrote:
Hello all
I've just had a loft conversion completed on a victorian semi. The
rear of the house is one large dormer with a (nearly) flat roof, and
we've left the chimney stack in place as we might use the dining room
fireplace one day.
The problem we have is that rain is getting in somewhere and coming
through the chimney breast plasterin the new loft room, but the roofer
can't work out where this is coming from.
Here is a picture of the plaster with a roll of masking tape for
scale. There are pencil lines around the damp circles as I was
measuring to see if they got bigger.
http://yfrog.com/7bixtj
Here are pictures from the outside:
http://yfrog.com/4vso3j
http://yfrog.com/6ds5mj
The roofer has re-pointed and patched up the mortar slope to the (very
old and unused) central heating cowel. The cowel was covered in a
plastic bag, but that made no difference.
If it rains moderately for an hour, the patches appear/get worse and
then take a week or two to dry out. To me that looks like the water
is being funnelled down quite effectively.
Could it really be soaking in from the brick? What else could it be?

Bloody obvious.

You have a flat roof and **** all flashing on the stack.,

Go up and prise up the lead. Bet you its all wet underneath.

You need to take roofing felt an carry it up the sides of the stack, to
where the flashing starts, and probably mastic it in, then put in new
flashing and dress it several inches out along and over the roofing
felt. So that driving rain under the flashing has to go a long way and
then UP to the flashing top, before it meets the brick.

Yu might also, as others have suggested, at the same time repoint the
stack and remortar the cowl top.

Personally I would scaffold up, or whatever, and demolish the stack top,
and start again and build a new top, done properly.

I take it the flat roof is part of the new conversion? If so its been
badly done.


care to expand - for the benefit of the OP?


I thought I had..


I don't like the way the flat roof has been sealed to the chimney. It
looks inadequate.

Water can run down the sides inside, and appear ..well wherever there is
a route. Probably through porous mortar.




Jim K

  #10  
Old June 7th 10, 12:31 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 511
Default Leaking chimney, but where is the water getting in? (see pics)

On Jun 7, 12:05 pm, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

I take it the flat roof is part of the new conversion? If so its been
badly done.


care to expand - for the benefit of the OP?


I thought I had..

I don't like the way the flat roof has been sealed to the chimney. It
looks inadequate.

Water can run down the sides inside, and appear ..well wherever there is
a route. Probably through porous mortar.


your last critique appeared to me to be a general "crap flat roof"
broadside so was hoping you could enlighten the OP with specifics taht
he could use to bolster his possible arguments with the professhunals
who did it - seems all you are picking at is the height of the stack
flashing and what may or may not be underneath it...

Jim K
 




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