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Condensate soakaway



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 16th 05, 02:11 PM
Rod
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Default Condensate soakaway

I can see no sensible way of routing a gravity condensate drain from our
proposed boiler location into an existing drain. (The location would be
in a 'boiler cupboard' where the existing floor standing boiler would be
replaced by a wall mounted unit.) Whichever route would cut across a
doorway.

There appear to be two options a) a soakaway and b) a condensate pump.

For us, even routing pumped condensate would be awkward. So I am taken
with the idea of a soakaway. I have looked up the basic details on the
ODPM site and we appear fine. But in newsgroup archives I noticed that
the Environment Agency apparently have rules that inhibit use of such
soakaways in some places. Does anyone have more information on this
issue? Are there any general guidelines as to the areas in which they
are or are not acceptable? (Our soil is a heavy clay which is one
concern.) Do we have to do anything special to gain approval?

I imagine that I should ring building control but was hoping to make at
least outline plans over the weekend.

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  #2  
Old April 16th 05, 11:32 PM
Mike
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Default


"Rod" wrote in message
. 4...
I can see no sensible way of routing a gravity condensate drain from our
proposed boiler location into an existing drain. (The location would be
in a 'boiler cupboard' where the existing floor standing boiler would be
replaced by a wall mounted unit.) Whichever route would cut across a
doorway.

There appear to be two options a) a soakaway and b) a condensate pump.

For us, even routing pumped condensate would be awkward. So I am taken
with the idea of a soakaway. I have looked up the basic details on the
ODPM site and we appear fine. But in newsgroup archives I noticed that
the Environment Agency apparently have rules that inhibit use of such
soakaways in some places. Does anyone have more information on this
issue?


There don't appear to be hard and fast rules but we got a flat 'no' and have
had to use a non-condensing boiler as a result.


  #3  
Old April 17th 05, 12:25 AM
Doctor Evil
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Mike" wrote in message
...

"Rod" wrote in message
. 4...
I can see no sensible way of routing a gravity condensate drain from our
proposed boiler location into an existing drain. (The location would be
in a 'boiler cupboard' where the existing floor standing boiler would be
replaced by a wall mounted unit.) Whichever route would cut across a
doorway.

There appear to be two options a) a soakaway and b) a condensate pump.

For us, even routing pumped condensate would be awkward. So I am taken
with the idea of a soakaway. I have looked up the basic details on the
ODPM site and we appear fine. But in newsgroup archives I noticed that
the Environment Agency apparently have rules that inhibit use of such
soakaways in some places. Does anyone have more information on this
issue?


There don't appear to be hard and fast rules but we got a flat 'no' and

have
had to use a non-condensing boiler as a result.


Because of the drain or the plume? The only real point to have
non-condensers in flats is the plume.



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  #4  
Old April 17th 05, 10:35 PM
Mike
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Doctor Evil" wrote in message
...
I can see no sensible way of routing a gravity condensate drain from

our
proposed boiler location into an existing drain. (The location would

be
in a 'boiler cupboard' where the existing floor standing boiler would

be
replaced by a wall mounted unit.) Whichever route would cut across a
doorway.

There appear to be two options a) a soakaway and b) a condensate pump.

For us, even routing pumped condensate would be awkward. So I am taken
with the idea of a soakaway. I have looked up the basic details on the
ODPM site and we appear fine. But in newsgroup archives I noticed that
the Environment Agency apparently have rules that inhibit use of such
soakaways in some places. Does anyone have more information on this
issue?


There don't appear to be hard and fast rules but we got a flat 'no' and

have
had to use a non-condensing boiler as a result.


Because of the drain or the plume? The only real point to have
non-condensers in flats is the plume.


The drain. If you recall discussions at the time my only alternative was a
condensate pump into barrels but nobody would quote for removing what is
classed as hazardous waste.


  #5  
Old April 18th 05, 10:53 PM
Rod
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Default

"Mike" wrote in
:

The drain. If you recall discussions at the time my only alternative
was a condensate pump into barrels but nobody would quote for removing
what is classed as hazardous waste.


Well we are luckier. Rang building control - they said no issue at all but
check with Environment Agency. Tried that and, after being misdirected and
dropped, got through to someone who would ring back. Amazingly, they did.
No issue again - so I asked for a letter confirming that.

I did point out to them that the lack of any mention of condensate drainage
on their website was perhaps a little less than helpful.

--
Rod
  #6  
Old April 18th 05, 11:33 PM
Mike
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Rod" wrote in message
. 4...
"Mike" wrote in
:

The drain. If you recall discussions at the time my only alternative
was a condensate pump into barrels but nobody would quote for removing
what is classed as hazardous waste.


Well we are luckier. Rang building control - they said no issue at all but
check with Environment Agency. Tried that and, after being misdirected and
dropped, got through to someone who would ring back. Amazingly, they did.
No issue again - so I asked for a letter confirming that.


Our stream feeds into a major local reservoir so the EA were a bit pickier
with us.
That said our septic tank feeds there anyway. I'm sure they'll insist on a
Klargister once it's reached the end of its life.




  #7  
Old April 18th 05, 11:58 PM
Rod
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Posts: n/a
Default

"Mike" wrote in
:

Our stream feeds into a major local reservoir so the EA were a bit
pickier with us.
That said our septic tank feeds there anyway. I'm sure they'll insist
on a Klargister once it's reached the end of its life.


I did ask what grounds (ha!) they might refuse on. Near a bore hole or on
an aquifer seeemed to be the only two answers. I guess heavy clay that
won't drain is not their problem - hope it isn't ours.

--
Rod

  #8  
Old April 19th 05, 12:41 AM
Lobster
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Posts: n/a
Default

Mike wrote:
"Rod" wrote in message
. 4...

"Mike" wrote in
:


The drain. If you recall discussions at the time my only alternative
was a condensate pump into barrels but nobody would quote for removing
what is classed as hazardous waste.


Well we are luckier. Rang building control - they said no issue at all but
check with Environment Agency. Tried that and, after being misdirected and
dropped, got through to someone who would ring back. Amazingly, they did.
No issue again - so I asked for a letter confirming that.



Our stream feeds into a major local reservoir so the EA were a bit pickier
with us.
That said our septic tank feeds there anyway. I'm sure they'll insist on a
Klargister once it's reached the end of its life.


But what's the problem with condensate? Slightly acidic maybe but hardly
a major pollutant surely??

David
  #9  
Old April 19th 05, 08:46 PM
Mike
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Lobster" wrote in message
...

Well we are luckier. Rang building control - they said no issue at all

but
check with Environment Agency. Tried that and, after being misdirected

and
dropped, got through to someone who would ring back. Amazingly, they

did.
No issue again - so I asked for a letter confirming that.



Our stream feeds into a major local reservoir so the EA were a bit

pickier
with us.
That said our septic tank feeds there anyway. I'm sure they'll insist

on a
Klargister once it's reached the end of its life.


But what's the problem with condensate? Slightly acidic maybe but hardly
a major pollutant surely??


You know that. I know that ! But do you think any EA oik is going to stick
his neck out and sign off you doing so ?

Sir Humphrey (Yes Minister) to Bernard - "nobody ever got fired for saying
no"


 




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