A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » Metalworking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Grinding lathe bed.



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old March 28th 13, 03:24 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,046
Default Grinding lathe bed.

On Mar 28, 9:48*am, Uffe Bærentsen wrote:
Hi


I'm sure that the ways will look good when you grind like this guy does.
But how about saddle wear? * * * *(don't know how to spell it :-( )
As far as I can see there is no way that you or me can remove saddle
wear grinding a bed like this only add more sway to the bed.

Am I right or wrong on this?

--
Uffe


Sometimes most anything will make things better. Many years ago a
friend and i purchased a worn out small Sears lathe. I used a file
and got it a lot better than it was originally. Not the a good way ,
but it still was a lot better after I was done. If I were doing a
large lathe like the one in the video and the lathe was not very
valuable, I would do my best to get rid of the saddle wear and then
grind the ways as he did.


Dan
Ads
  #2  
Old March 28th 13, 05:36 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,662
Default Grinding lathe bed.

On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 08:24:41 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Mar 28, 9:48*am, Uffe Bærentsen wrote:
Hi


I'm sure that the ways will look good when you grind like this guy does.
But how about saddle wear? * * * *(don't know how to spell it :-( )
As far as I can see there is no way that you or me can remove saddle
wear grinding a bed like this only add more sway to the bed.

Am I right or wrong on this?

--
Uffe


Sometimes most anything will make things better. Many years ago a
friend and i purchased a worn out small Sears lathe. I used a file
and got it a lot better than it was originally. Not the a good way ,
but it still was a lot better after I was done. If I were doing a
large lathe like the one in the video and the lathe was not very
valuable, I would do my best to get rid of the saddle wear and then
grind the ways as he did.


Dan


He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways, which are
likely to be in better shape than the carriage ways, especially up
near the headstock.

Coincidentally, the guy calls himself "4GSR," which I assume is a
reference to the LeBlond 4GSR boring lathe. I was involved in the bed
refurb of a 4GSR recently. 70 feet long, 16" hole thru the spindle.

--
Ned Simmons
  #3  
Old March 28th 13, 06:05 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,915
Default Grinding lathe bed.

Ned Simmons fired this volley in
:

He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways, which are
likely to be in better shape than the carriage ways, especially up
near the headstock.


---
Ned, you make a good point I didn't look for. If that's the case, the
ways just might get ground O.K. (assuming any way to make sure that
stone's face is perfectly parallel to the desired angle, and dressed to
match!)

It might not be 'right', but probably not too bad.

Lloyd
  #4  
Old March 28th 13, 06:07 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,915
Default Grinding lathe bed.

Ned Simmons fired this volley in
:

He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways


I might have to take that back... PT later on down mentioned that the L&S
carriage runs on both front and back ways.

L
  #5  
Old March 28th 13, 06:37 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 564
Default Grinding lathe bed.


"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" lloydspinsidemindspring.com wrote in message . 3.70...
Ned Simmons fired this volley in
:

He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways


I might have to take that back... PT later on down mentioned that the L&S
carriage runs on both front and back ways.


That's not to imply that tailstock does not run in a separate set of ways--I simply can not remember.

It's been almost 20 years now since I've worked at a place that had several dozen lathes of various make and sizes all within in the same facility.
  #6  
Old March 28th 13, 06:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 564
Default Grinding lathe bed.


"Ned Simmons" wrote in message ...
On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 08:24:41 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Mar 28, 9:48 am, Uffe Bærentsen wrote:
Hi


I'm sure that the ways will look good when you grind like this guy does.
But how about saddle wear? (don't know how to spell it :-( )
As far as I can see there is no way that you or me can remove saddle
wear grinding a bed like this only add more sway to the bed.

Am I right or wrong on this?

--
Uffe


Sometimes most anything will make things better. Many years ago a
friend and i purchased a worn out small Sears lathe. I used a file
and got it a lot better than it was originally. Not the a good way ,
but it still was a lot better after I was done. If I were doing a
large lathe like the one in the video and the lathe was not very
valuable, I would do my best to get rid of the saddle wear and then
grind the ways as he did.


Dan


He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways, which are
likely to be in better shape than the carriage ways, especially up
near the headstock.

Coincidentally, the guy calls himself "4GSR," which I assume is a
reference to the LeBlond 4GSR boring lathe. I was involved in the bed
refurb of a 4GSR recently. 70 feet long, 16" hole thru the spindle.


That's a monster....

We had a couple of travelling collumn horizontal boring mills with beds about that lengh when I was with Certified Aerospace in the early 80's--pretty sure they ran on a one-piece bed but I can't say for sure.

Later, when I was at Boeing Portland, they put in some spanking-new G&L cnc boring mills but these were 20, 40 and 60 foot sections, bolted together with the 60ft bed being the max available if I recall correctly.
  #7  
Old March 28th 13, 07:35 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,662
Default Grinding lathe bed.

On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 13:07:08 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"
lloydspinsidemindspring.com wrote:

Ned Simmons fired this volley in
:

He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways


I might have to take that back... PT later on down mentioned that the L&S
carriage runs on both front and back ways.

L


He's not running on the functional surfaces of the ways at all:
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...rinder-225515/
http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i1...r/DSCN0611.jpg

Even though he claims those surfaces are ground in the same setup as
the working surfaces, I'd be concerned how much care was taken
grinding the non-functional surfaces. And the rollers have the
disadvantage of transferring small irregularities to the grinding
wheel. I guess the cost-benefit calculation has to include how bad the
worn really ways are, and what you're hoping for after the regrind.

--
Ned Simmons
  #8  
Old March 28th 13, 07:45 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,662
Default Grinding lathe bed.

On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 11:49:48 -0700, "PrecisionmachinisT"
wrote:


"Ned Simmons" wrote in message ...
On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 08:24:41 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Mar 28, 9:48 am, Uffe Bærentsen wrote:
Hi


I'm sure that the ways will look good when you grind like this guy does.
But how about saddle wear? (don't know how to spell it :-( )
As far as I can see there is no way that you or me can remove saddle
wear grinding a bed like this only add more sway to the bed.

Am I right or wrong on this?

--
Uffe

Sometimes most anything will make things better. Many years ago a
friend and i purchased a worn out small Sears lathe. I used a file
and got it a lot better than it was originally. Not the a good way ,
but it still was a lot better after I was done. If I were doing a
large lathe like the one in the video and the lathe was not very
valuable, I would do my best to get rid of the saddle wear and then
grind the ways as he did.


Dan


He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways, which are
likely to be in better shape than the carriage ways, especially up
near the headstock.

Coincidentally, the guy calls himself "4GSR," which I assume is a
reference to the LeBlond 4GSR boring lathe. I was involved in the bed
refurb of a 4GSR recently. 70 feet long, 16" hole thru the spindle.


That's a monster....

We had a couple of travelling collumn horizontal boring mills with beds about that lengh when I was with Certified Aerospace in the early 80's--pretty sure they ran on a one-piece bed but I can't say for sure.

Later, when I was at Boeing Portland, they put in some spanking-new G&L cnc boring mills but these were 20, 40 and 60 foot sections, bolted together with the 60ft bed being the max available if I recall correctly.


That machine also has a sectional bed, the longest section being about
30 feet. I spent a fair amount of time documenting exactly what was
expected for tolerances on the ways after grinding, and after the bed
was subsequently disassembled, moved and reassembled.

--
Ned Simmons
  #9  
Old March 28th 13, 07:54 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,915
Default Grinding lathe bed.

Ned Simmons fired this volley in
:


He's not running on the functional surfaces of the ways at all:


Heh! It's pretty clear he "first guessed" all our second-guesses.
If one can count on the apron surface and top surfaces to be true, then
that should do it.

(I still wonder how he establishes the correct angle and dress on that
stone, though. Didn't see anythin' in the pictures showing that part.)

Lloyd
  #10  
Old March 28th 13, 08:01 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,967
Default Grinding lathe bed.

On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 11:37:32 -0700, "PrecisionmachinisT"
wrote:


"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" lloydspinsidemindspring.com wrote in message . 3.70...
Ned Simmons fired this volley in
:

He's probably running the grinder on the tailstock ways


I might have to take that back... PT later on down mentioned that the L&S
carriage runs on both front and back ways.


That's not to imply that tailstock does not run in a separate set of ways--I simply can not remember.

It's been almost 20 years now since I've worked at a place that had several dozen lathes of various make and sizes all within in the same facility.


If this L&S lathe bed is representative:

http://www.lathes.co.uk/lodgeshipley/

....then it's the same as my SB, only reversed back-to-front. The
tailstock rides on an inner flat and an inner V, while the carriage
rides on the pair of outer Vs.

Thus, if he's riding on the tailstock ways, he could get some
improvement. If not, not.

--
Ed Huntress
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Freehand grinding of Lathe bits Ignoramus13611 Metalworking 57 August 19th 09 06:15 AM
What abrasive wheels for lathe bit grinding Ignoramus2031 Metalworking 24 July 23rd 08 02:20 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright ©2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.