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Video inspection of sewer lines



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 5th 09, 04:08 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 464
Default Video inspection of sewer lines


"RicodJour" wrote in message
...
On Jun 5, 10:25 am, RickMerrill
wrote:
BetaB4 wrote:
I have a sewer line that has been clogging up several times over the
past 6
weeks or so, and I would like to be able to figure out exactly what's
going
on. I know one option is to pay someone to come out and do the video
inspection, ...


What makes you think that you can see through sewage? Video is
impractical because first you would have to flush the system with clear
water.

What you want is a sonar probe.


Industry standard is the Ridgid video.

But why? You will still have a clog that has to be fixed.

Try the "roto-router" approach and maybe you'll be lucky
and not have to dig up the whole thing.


A sewer line is rarely filled. The video camera snakes have bright
LED lights on the end. If you get to a point where you can't see
anything, you've found the blockage, right?

R

Apparently, no one has used one of these. On the camera end, they have
nozzles that take high pressure water and spray it onto the walls of the
pipe, like a power sprayer. This flushes goo ahead of the camera, or just
cleans out spots the camera wants to get a better look. If the pipes are
installed correctly, the poop runs downhill, and there's a clear field of
vision. I watched the guy do mine, and I was amazed at the small amount of
fluid in the line. Mine had a root which they snipped. But at the same
time, they will jet the whole line, cleaning off the pipe walls, and leaving
you with a whole lot better system. Of course, they don't do it cheap or
for free, as these machines cost quite a bit, and their time is worth
something, what with the truck, and the insurance, and the licenses, and all
that.

Steve


Ads
  #12  
Old June 5th 09, 09:41 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 45
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

Paul Franklin wrote:

Most of the tool rental places here in NE Ohio rent this gear. It's
not cheap, but probably cheaper than hiring a plumber to do it.


Thanks. I took your suggestion and I called all of the tool rental places I
can find in my area. Unfortunately, they all said that they do not have
that type of equipment to rent. Most said it's because the cost of the
equipment itself is so high, and I assume there is not enough demand for it
as a rental for them to recover their costs.


  #13  
Old June 5th 09, 09:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 45
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

bob haller wrote:

Why dig if the trouble is tree roots?

just buy some rock salt, mix with hot water in a washtub, and let it
go down the sewer. do before going to work for the day so it can sit
in the line. it will kill the roots buit not the tree, is cheap and
effective.


Thanks. I already have rock salt from this past winter so I'll do that. It
can't hurt. But I still may end up doing the video routine one way or
another so I can see for sure what's going on.


  #14  
Old June 5th 09, 09:50 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 45
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

RickMerrill wrote:

Try the "roto-router" approach and maybe you'll be lucky
and not have to dig up the whole thing.


I did do the "roto-rooter" routine -- twice. Actually, I paid the plumbing
company that I use to come out twice in two weeks and they cleared it out
both times. After that, I had the town clear it out two more times in about
a 2-week period and that worked both times. It is not presently clogged,
and there is still some uncertainty (according to the town people) about
what may be causing the problem and/or where the problem is located.


  #15  
Old June 5th 09, 09:52 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 4,770
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

On Jun 5, 4:45*pm, "BetaB4" wrote:
bob haller wrote:

Why dig if the trouble is tree roots?


just buy some rock salt, mix with hot water in a washtub, and let it
go down the sewer. do before going to work for the day so it can sit
in the line. it will kill the roots buit not the tree, is cheap and
effective.


Thanks. *I already have rock salt from this past winter so I'll do that.. *It
can't hurt. *But I still may end up doing the video routine one way or
another so I can see for sure what's going on.


This begs the question, if the rock salt clears up the problem (I'm
giving 2:1 odds it will), how much are you willing to spend to satisfy
your curiosity?

R
  #16  
Old June 5th 09, 09:58 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 45
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

SteveB wrote:

Watch on ebay and try to find a system at a bargain price.


After my original post, I did try going to ebay to see if they were
available for sale, what they cost, etc.


HIRE A PRO, YOU CHEAP *******.


I was surprised to see this type of obnoxious comment from you, 1) because I
don't recall you being that type of poster on this newsgroup in the past,
and, 2) because you don't know me, and you have no idea about who I am or
whether this has anything to do with me trying to be cheap (which it
doesn't).


  #17  
Old June 5th 09, 10:12 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,421
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

BetaB4 wrote:
I have a sewer line that has been clogging up several times over the past 6
weeks or so, and I would like to be able to figure out exactly what's going
on. I know one option is to pay someone to come out and do the video
inspection, but I have heard that can be fairly expensive. Does anyone know
of any less expensive ways that I can do this myself? For example, are
there any tool rental places that rent the equipment to do a video
inspection?


I contacted the city after two of four sewer blockages at our condo.
The second time, they came out and ran a camera up from their main sewer
line and up ours. They determined that our line was "in bad shape", but
gave no other details. Right after that, they installed a clean out at
the edge of our property, so that we would, in the future, only have to
go that far to remove obstructions. After that, the condo hired a
plumber to scope it, and I watched while they did it - could see pretty
plainly that the bottom of the cast iron line was gone. One guy fed the
line into the sewer and watched the monitor while the other tracked the
probe, using something that looked like a metal detector and sounded
when it was over the camera....the line has markings for distance, so's
one will know where the blockages are.

My son has an underwater camera for fishing that he raves
about....haven't seen it, don't know how it would work, but here is a
link on some....

http://www.aquavu.com/store/
  #18  
Old June 5th 09, 10:14 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 1,421
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

I forgot to mention....bug the city to install a clean out at the edge
of your property and make sure that their line is located and clear.
  #19  
Old June 5th 09, 10:23 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 45
Default Video inspection of sewer lines

RicodJour wrote:
On Jun 5, 4:45 pm, "BetaB4" wrote:
bob haller wrote:

Why dig if the trouble is tree roots?


just buy some rock salt, mix with hot water in a washtub, and let it
go down the sewer. do before going to work for the day so it can sit
in the line. it will kill the roots buit not the tree, is cheap and
effective.


Thanks. I already have rock salt from this past winter so I'll do
that. It can't hurt. But I still may end up doing the video routine
one way or another so I can see for sure what's going on.


This begs the question, if the rock salt clears up the problem (I'm
giving 2:1 odds it will), how much are you willing to spend to satisfy
your curiosity?


I am not sure about that. I called the plumbing company that I usually use
and they said they don't actually do it themselves, they have an outside
company do it. They gave me the name of the company that they use, but it's
one of those deals where you call the guy and then he calls you back when he
can. I checked out that company's website and I'll probably call them
tomorrow morning and see what they say.

I am trying to get some general information here about my options and
whether there are any relatively inexpensive or creative ways to get a look
at the inside of the pipe on my own.

If the clog returns, my next step will probably be to ask the town if they
have the video equipment and if they will do a visual check of the main line
since they keep having to come out and clear whatever is causing the
blockage. But, if they say they can't or won't do that, then maybe I'll pay
someone to do it. If I could buy the equipment for a couple of hundred
bucks (which I now know I can't), I would probably just buy it and do it on
my own out of curiosity and because I could probaly use the same equipment
in the future. I know that doesn't exactly answer the question, but that's
the basic answer.

Now, what would really be cool would be if there was some computer techie of
doing this kind of like a home-made science experiment. For example, what
if I could buy some type of low-end video camera input device that I could
connect to my laptop computer, and then attach that and an LED light to the
end of the drain snake and take a look. I think that would be cool, but I
guess that's just a dream and not a realistic option even if it would just
be as an experiment.


  #20  
Old June 5th 09, 10:45 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 262
Default Video inspection of sewer lines


"BetaB4" wrote in message
...
RicodJour wrote:
On Jun 5, 4:45 pm, "BetaB4" wrote:
bob haller wrote:

Why dig if the trouble is tree roots?

just buy some rock salt, mix with hot water in a washtub, and let it
go down the sewer. do before going to work for the day so it can sit
in the line. it will kill the roots buit not the tree, is cheap and
effective.

Thanks. I already have rock salt from this past winter so I'll do
that. It can't hurt. But I still may end up doing the video routine
one way or another so I can see for sure what's going on.


This begs the question, if the rock salt clears up the problem (I'm
giving 2:1 odds it will), how much are you willing to spend to satisfy
your curiosity?


I am not sure about that. I called the plumbing company that I usually
use and they said they don't actually do it themselves, they have an
outside company do it. They gave me the name of the company that they
use, but it's one of those deals where you call the guy and then he calls
you back when he can. I checked out that company's website and I'll
probably call them tomorrow morning and see what they say.

I am trying to get some general information here about my options and
whether there are any relatively inexpensive or creative ways to get a
look at the inside of the pipe on my own.

If the clog returns, my next step will probably be to ask the town if they
have the video equipment and if they will do a visual check of the main
line since they keep having to come out and clear whatever is causing the
blockage. But, if they say they can't or won't do that, then maybe I'll
pay someone to do it. If I could buy the equipment for a couple of
hundred bucks (which I now know I can't), I would probably just buy it and
do it on my own out of curiosity and because I could probaly use the same
equipment in the future. I know that doesn't exactly answer the question,
but that's the basic answer.

Now, what would really be cool would be if there was some computer techie
of doing this kind of like a home-made science experiment. For example,
what if I could buy some type of low-end video camera input device that I
could connect to my laptop computer, and then attach that and an LED light
to the end of the drain snake and take a look. I think that would be
cool, but I guess that's just a dream and not a realistic option even if
it would just be as an experiment.


did you check harbor freight?


 




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