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Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf



 
 
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  #51  
Old November 3rd 07, 12:18 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Jim Yanik wrote:
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost

[quoted text clipped - 13 lines]
all the parts together. It's been a few years without failure.
MLD

Regarding Gorilla glue, I use it for everything. It is the best glue ever. The secret is usng Just enough. The popsicle sticks are a neat trick. When I can, I use string or cording. Iie the ends of the string together when wet. (It will be stromger when dryas it shrinks.) Make a tight knot. Wrap the string around item that needs to be clamped(for gluing). Then take a stick/pencil/dowel, loop string around such then start twisting the stick/pencil dowel until tight. Then tape stick, etc. solid or secure pencil/stick on itself or wedge it so it remains tight. It works wonders and is cheaper than clamps.



I had a plastic clamp for a clip-on fan break,and I used epoxy and popsicle
sticks to reinforce it;you have to let the epoxy cure for a week or two
before putting it under stress,to get it's full strength.
The clamp has a very strong spring,and it's held up for about two years
now. I used RAKA boat building epoxy and fumed silica thickener. I tried J-
B Weld before that,but it didn't hold up very long.It seems to be a softer
epoxy. System Three or West System epoxy would do just as well as the RAKA.

The popsicle sticks are stiff and give more strength than a paper clip
will,and epoxy bonds to it better.

Polyurethane glues are crap.(Gorilla Glue)They also foam up,expand and make
a mess.For wood,I guess they are OK.


--
Betty Boop

Ads
  #52  
Old November 3rd 07, 03:19 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 8,284
Default Screwing a broken ankle

On Nov 2, 8:10 pm, Smitty Two wrote:
In article . com,





DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Nov 2, 4:27 pm, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Nov 2, 4:07 pm, Smitty Two wrote:


In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:


On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 14:49:50 -0400, Dan Espen
wrote:


Smitty Two writes:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:


In article
,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!


What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around
the
house works great for wounds.


Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.


Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that
the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws
are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?


Sometimes Google satisfies, sometimes it doesn't.
I couldn't verify the cost of the screws you indicate above
but I did see some of the screws are stainless steel and
some are titanium.


$1800 does seem a bit steep, even for titanium.
I'd guess there's a very low volume and a lot
of inspections, including xrays of the part involved though.


I'd like to see smitty get his ankle smashed into a thousand pieces and
then
have his doc use some bigbox hardware store home construction screws.
After
all, all screws are the same.


I find it curious that you insist on being so irrational. When did I say
that all screws were the same? I didn't attack or insult you, all I did
was ask you to substantiate your claim that a surgical screw is as
different from a hardware store screw as a space rocket is from a bottle
rocket.


You're the one who claimed to have seen a surgical screw, and said it
was completely different. If you want me to believe that, you're going
to have to tell me in what ways it's different. There are one cent
screws and there are $20 screws. Have you ever made a screw? Seen one
being made? Now tell me what it is, exactly, that makes a surgical screw
worth $1800, outside of all the bureaucracy that's involved, as others
pointed out.


Incidentally, my mom shattered all the bones in her ankle in 1953.
Doctors said she'd never walk again, which she did, without the
slightest limp, for another forty years. I'm guessing there were no
$1800 screws involved, even adjusted for inflation.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


I'm not taking sides here, but if you want to see the difference
between surgical screw and hardware store screw, scroll down to the
Screw section of this site. Just like there are many variations of
hardware store screws, there are many variations of surgical screws.
I'm guessing once we start talking about hollow-shaft screws, we are
talking about considerable added expense.


http://www.rad.washington.edu/mskboo...ware.html-Hide quoted
text -


- Show quoted text -


I scanned the site I mentioned earlier and went past the Screw
section, into the Plate section to find another screw that could be
pretty expensive. Here's the text that's under the pictu


...the medial malleolar fracture above is held together by one of
these screws, made of a radiolucent polycarbonate material, which is
designed to eventually be absorbed by the body -- this type of screw
is known locally as "stealth hardware"


I'm guessing Lowes doesn't carry these in those little drawers. ;-)


http://www.rad.washington.edu/mskboo...chardware.html


Interesting link, thanks. I like the design of the Herbert screw. Very
clever. Nothing too difficult about making any of those, though.
Drilling longitudinal holes is easy enough, and as far as the "stealth"
screw, I wouldn't classify polycarbonate (the stuff of throw-away picnic
glasses) as Unobtainium. I didn't see any notes on what metal(s) were
used on the other ones.

I also found it surprising that in some cases, drilling a pilot hole for
the screw can weaken the bone by as much as 90%.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I also found it surprising that in some cases, drilling a pilot
hole for the screw can weaken the bone by as much as 90%

Without any context, that statistic doesn't tell us much. They can
say that in "some cases" there's a 90% weakening, even if 99.99% of
the pilot holes only weaken the bone by 10%. All you need is a few
cases at 90% and you can make an "in some cases" claim sound
frightening.

I was watching CNN the other day and they were talking about the huge
disparity in death sentences given to one race over another. However,
they never gave any statistics related to the number of capital crimes
committed by either race. I'm not saying there isn't a disparity, but
how can I tell if the reported ratio of means anything unless they
also tell me the ratio of crimes committed by the races involved?

Statistics only have meaning when you know the full story behind the
data.

  #53  
Old November 3rd 07, 04:56 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,054
Default Screwing a broken ankle

In article . com,
DerbyDad03 wrote:

I also found it surprising that in some cases, drilling a pilot
hole for the screw can weaken the bone by as much as 90%

Without any context, that statistic doesn't tell us much. They can
say that in "some cases" there's a 90% weakening, even if 99.99% of
the pilot holes only weaken the bone by 10%. All you need is a few
cases at 90% and you can make an "in some cases" claim sound
frightening.

I was watching CNN the other day and they were talking about the huge
disparity in death sentences given to one race over another. However,
they never gave any statistics related to the number of capital crimes
committed by either race. I'm not saying there isn't a disparity, but
how can I tell if the reported ratio of means anything unless they
also tell me the ratio of crimes committed by the races involved?

Statistics only have meaning when you know the full story behind the
data.


I'm with you there. Nothing annoys me more than statistics divorced from
context. But hey, it was *your* source! FWIW, here's the sentence, which
might not give the number teeth, but maybe enough gum to chew oatmeal.
At least the surgeon should have a vague idea that drilling holes can be
detrimental as well as beneficial.

"One final word on screws: in order to use them, you have to make a
screw hole in the bone or in the hardware that uses them. This is of
note because screw holes weaken whatever material they pass through. I
have read biomechanical estimates that one screw hole passing through
both cortices of a femoral shaft will weaken that femur by 90 % to some
types of stress."
  #54  
Old November 3rd 07, 01:32 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 8,284
Default Screwing a broken ankle

On Nov 3, 12:56 am, Smitty Two wrote:
In article . com,





DerbyDad03 wrote:
I also found it surprising that in some cases, drilling a pilot
hole for the screw can weaken the bone by as much as 90%


Without any context, that statistic doesn't tell us much. They can
say that in "some cases" there's a 90% weakening, even if 99.99% of
the pilot holes only weaken the bone by 10%. All you need is a few
cases at 90% and you can make an "in some cases" claim sound
frightening.


I was watching CNN the other day and they were talking about the huge
disparity in death sentences given to one race over another. However,
they never gave any statistics related to the number of capital crimes
committed by either race. I'm not saying there isn't a disparity, but
how can I tell if the reported ratio of means anything unless they
also tell me the ratio of crimes committed by the races involved?


Statistics only have meaning when you know the full story behind the
data.


I'm with you there. Nothing annoys me more than statistics divorced from
context. But hey, it was *your* source! FWIW, here's the sentence, which
might not give the number teeth, but maybe enough gum to chew oatmeal.
At least the surgeon should have a vague idea that drilling holes can be
detrimental as well as beneficial.

"One final word on screws: in order to use them, you have to make a
screw hole in the bone or in the hardware that uses them. This is of
note because screw holes weaken whatever material they pass through. I
have read biomechanical estimates that one screw hole passing through
both cortices of a femoral shaft will weaken that femur by 90 % to some
types of stress."- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


But hey, it was *your* source!

It was my source for the difference between a hardware store screw and
a surgical screw. Any other data culled from that site becomes the
responsibility of the culler. ;-)

  #55  
Old November 4th 07, 03:44 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 857
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

According to Smitty Two :

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Medical grade CA is a different formulation with somewhat more high
grade component chemicals. This shouldn't be a surprise - dimestore
grade CA doesn't perform nearly as well as even "Hot Stuff" does.

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate, most regular
CA glue is methyl-2-cyanoacrylate, which degrades fairly quickly
in contact with human tissue and produces formaldehyde. Which is
a pretty strong irritant. Medical CA is 2-octyl cyanoacrylate
which degrades _much_ slower, and won't produce tissue irritation.

The FDA has only approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for medical use.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  #56  
Old November 4th 07, 04:03 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 857
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

According to larry moe 'n curly :

Joe wrote:
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


Aren't most plastic pieces inside refrigerators made of PVC? If so,
you want to use solvent, not glue, to fix them. Acetone or laquer
thinner will work, but hobby shops and electronics supplies. have
stuff made especially for gluing plastic models and TV cabinets.


Acetone doesn't work that well on PVC. PVC glue has small quantities
of acetone, but the main ingredients is MEK, Tetrahydrofuran,
PVC resin and some other solvents. Model airplane glue is acetone
based aimed for use on polystyrene. Laquer thinner is largely MEK
I think, but it's not designed as a glue, it'll be messy, and
glue joints probably brittle because it has no "body" to it.

Best way to glue PVC is PVC pipe glue.

I've done some major repairs to ABS-based devices using ABS
pipe glue (rebuilt a leaf blower after the impeller came apart
and demolished the blower housing. Bought a new impeller (no
way a glued one was going to balance let alone stay together,
but the housing was pieced back together). I'm sure that PVC glue
will work as well on PVC. Throwing scrap bits of PVC in as
reinforcements will help too.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  #57  
Old November 4th 07, 04:32 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 5,054
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

In article ,
(Chris Lewis) wrote:

According to Smitty Two :

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Medical grade CA is a different formulation with somewhat more high
grade component chemicals. This shouldn't be a surprise - dimestore
grade CA doesn't perform nearly as well as even "Hot Stuff" does.

According to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate, most regular
CA glue is methyl-2-cyanoacrylate, which degrades fairly quickly
in contact with human tissue and produces formaldehyde. Which is
a pretty strong irritant. Medical CA is 2-octyl cyanoacrylate
which degrades _much_ slower, and won't produce tissue irritation.

The FDA has only approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for medical use.


Interesting article, thanks. We use hot stuff for a lot of things around
the shop, including cuts. I didn't realize there was a difference
between brands, other than various viscosity formulations.
  #58  
Old November 4th 07, 04:42 AM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,158
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Chris Lewis wrote:
According to Smitty Two :

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Medical grade CA is a different formulation with somewhat more high
grade component chemicals. This shouldn't be a surprise - dimestore
grade CA doesn't perform nearly as well as even "Hot Stuff" does.

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate, most regular
CA glue is methyl-2-cyanoacrylate, which degrades fairly quickly
in contact with human tissue and produces formaldehyde. Which is
a pretty strong irritant. Medical CA is 2-octyl cyanoacrylate
which degrades _much_ slower, and won't produce tissue irritation.

The FDA has only approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for medical use.

Shrug. I use the civilian, non-medical-rated stuff on cracked and split
fingernails, and even on the occasional paper cut, on a routine basis.
(You know, like when you get a cut beside your nail, so whenever you
stick that hand in your pocket, the cut catches, and you scream in pain?
CA works great to keep those sealed.)

aem sends...
  #59  
Old November 4th 07, 04:53 AM posted to alt.home.repair
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Posts: 857
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

According to Smitty Two :
I wrote in article ,
The FDA has only approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for medical use.


Interesting article, thanks. We use hot stuff for a lot of things around
the shop, including cuts. I didn't realize there was a difference
between brands, other than various viscosity formulations.


I've been finding the cheap stuff often doesn't bond very well,
while Hot Stuff does what we want all the time. I tend
to think of CA (even Hot Stuff) only as a temporary glue for the
stuff we do (eg: model and high power rocketry). Good for (some)
quick field repairs, or tacking a part so that a slow-set glue can
cure, but it doesn't put up with temperature extremes or dampness
that well, and it's not that strong compared to a good epoxy
or even yellow/white glue. On the materials we work with of
course... (paper, cardboard, fiberglass, aluminum).

It does have one property that's highly prized in rocketry - being
very thin, it'll soak in and reinforce cardboard edges after they
start getting banged up.

I'm sure Hot Stuff is fine for small cuts - the amount of formaldehyde
would be quite small. However, formaldehyde _is_ nasty stuff and an
allergic sensitizer, and if you were dealing with the sizes of
incisions/wounds that surgeons would, it would begin to matter quite a
bit.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  #60  
Old November 4th 07, 06:05 PM posted to alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,505
Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Nov 3, 11:42 pm, aemeijers wrote:
Chris Lewis wrote:
According to Smitty Two :


What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Medical grade CA is a different formulation with somewhat more high
grade component chemicals. This shouldn't be a surprise - dimestore
grade CA doesn't perform nearly as well as even "Hot Stuff" does.


According tohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate, most regular
CA glue is methyl-2-cyanoacrylate, which degrades fairly quickly
in contact with human tissue and produces formaldehyde. Which is
a pretty strong irritant. Medical CA is 2-octyl cyanoacrylate
which degrades _much_ slower, and won't produce tissue irritation.


The FDA has only approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for medical use.


Shrug. I use the civilian, non-medical-rated stuff on cracked and split
fingernails, and even on the occasional paper cut, on a routine basis.
(You know, like when you get a cut beside your nail, so whenever you
stick that hand in your pocket, the cut catches, and you scream in pain?
CA works great to keep those sealed.)

aem sends...- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


For the OP original question, while at Home Depot, I found they have a
super glue made by locktite that specifically for plasitcs. I don't
know how much better or different it may be thqn std crazyt glue, but
that's what I went with. I just repaired my refrig shelf foot with
it. It cost about $3 and is a two part system. First you apply some
kind of activator to both surfaces, which goes on with a small magic
marker type device. Then you apply the glue to one surface and hold
together for 30 secs.

A lot of this depends of course on where the break is. In my case,
it's on one of the 4 feet that holds it, but it winds up with most of
the load pressing down onto the crack faces as opposed to shearing
force which would cause the crack surfaces to try to move against each
other. Hopefully it will hold, I'll let you know if it falls apart.

 




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