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Joe Joe is offline
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

http://cnd-industry.com/

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf


"Joe" wrote in message
ups.com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes

Different product (soap dish) I cemented paper clips under and across the
broken pieces. I used Phenoseal ( great adhesive caulking) to put all the
parts together. It's been a few years without failure.
MLD


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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

I'd suggest a 2 part epoxy glue. Gorilla glue is great on porous materials
but doesn't stick to plastic, that's why you can pull off the cap even when
its coated with dried glue.


"Joe" wrote in message
ups.com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes



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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Joe writes:

I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


You have no chance of succeeding without analysis of the species of plastic
and what will bond to it. Few plastics admit a glue bond anything close to
the strength of the original material (which, after all, itself failed), so
your quest is quite futile. The notion of pinning is misconceived.

Polyurethane glue such as the overhyped brand you mention has its
applications, but this isn't one of them, and you shouldn't be suckered by
the phony labeling into thinking it is.

Glues and stuff to pour into your car are sold as easy miracles to solve
hopeless problems. It's best to learn that not every claim on the retail
shelf is credible, despite your natural credulity. Save your child's wonder
for the toy store, and develop your aging cynicism for $10 bottles of
stickum.


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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

"MLD" wrote in news:Nb1Wi.2576$mv.609@trndny08:


"Joe" wrote in message
ups.com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different
and see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6
holes in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to
insert pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement
for the glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement.
Has anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it
will increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making
it work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces
because it will expand into the holes

Different product (soap dish) I cemented paper clips under and across
the broken pieces. I used Phenoseal ( great adhesive caulking) to put
all the parts together. It's been a few years without failure.
MLD




I had a plastic clamp for a clip-on fan break,and I used epoxy and popsicle
sticks to reinforce it;you have to let the epoxy cure for a week or two
before putting it under stress,to get it's full strength.
The clamp has a very strong spring,and it's held up for about two years
now. I used RAKA boat building epoxy and fumed silica thickener. I tried J-
B Weld before that,but it didn't hold up very long.It seems to be a softer
epoxy. System Three or West System epoxy would do just as well as the RAKA.

The popsicle sticks are stiff and give more strength than a paper clip
will,and epoxy bonds to it better.

Polyurethane glues are crap.(Gorilla Glue)They also foam up,expand and make
a mess.For wood,I guess they are OK.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

You need to test a few spots to see what will hold. I love to use crazy glue
(Cyanoacrylate Adhesives) but it only works on certain plastics and
basically solvent welds them together. In some cases it's stronger than the
original bond.


"Joe" wrote in message
ups.com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes



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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Oct 31, 12:17 pm, Jim Yanik wrote:
"MLD" wrote innews:Nb1Wi.2576$mv.609@trndny08:





"Joe" wrote in message
oups.com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different
and see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6
holes in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to
insert pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement
for the glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement.
Has anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it
will increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making
it work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces
because it will expand into the holes


Different product (soap dish) I cemented paper clips under and across
the broken pieces. I used Phenoseal ( great adhesive caulking) to put
all the parts together. It's been a few years without failure.
MLD


I had a plastic clamp for a clip-on fan break,and I used epoxy and popsicle
sticks to reinforce it;you have to let the epoxy cure for a week or two
before putting it under stress,to get it's full strength.
The clamp has a very strong spring,and it's held up for about two years
now. I used RAKA boat building epoxy and fumed silica thickener. I tried J-
B Weld before that,but it didn't hold up very long.It seems to be a softer
epoxy. System Three or West System epoxy would do just as well as the RAKA.

The popsicle sticks are stiff and give more strength than a paper clip
will,and epoxy bonds to it better.

Polyurethane glues are crap.(Gorilla Glue)They also foam up,expand and make
a mess.For wood,I guess they are OK.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net


That's weird, I was doing some reading last night and it was
recommended to stay away from epoxy for plastic and then someone said
polyurethane worked great on plastic. Confusing. I guess all plastics
are different and some work best with poly and others with epoxy. I've
had great success with Gorilla Glue. I think the people who don't
aren't clamping the piece for 24 hrs. I've had the same experience
you've had with JB Weld. Funny, I used it a decade ago to fix a crack
in my radiator that sealed it shut now I have a problem getting it to
join anything that is stressed, I wonder if they changed the formula.
I'll try the Raka stuff you mentioned, any clue on where I can locally?

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 14:12:21 -0000, Joe wrote:

My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes



I tried something similar with disappointing results. Your mileage
might be better. Replacement shelves are way too expensive, So I'd
just do without the shelf until the refrigerator gets trashed. I have
good woodworking skills, so I'd construct a slotted shelf from white
oak.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Oct 31, 6:12 am, Joe wrote:
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


Might work or more likely a shelf collapse and a big mess. Sounds like
you just need new shelf supports. Probably not much more than the
price of the glue.
Try this:
http://www.repairclinic.com/SmartSea...artsearch.aspx




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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf



My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces.


I had that problem too. To resolve it I got rid of the wife and had
enough spare money to buy a new refrigerator.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Joe wrote in article
. com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes

Uh, the brackets are alvailable through most independant appliance stores
for a nominal price; or, you can order them from the manufacturer. Last
time, I paid about $6.00 for a pair.
TomC
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Joe wrote in
oups.com:

On Oct 31, 12:17 pm, Jim Yanik wrote:
"MLD" wrote innews:Nb1Wi.2576$mv.609@trndny08:





"Joe" wrote in message
oups.com...
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to
be too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in
almost identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces
of plastic together to support weight but I'd like to try
something different and see if it works. I'm going to take my
Dremel and drill about 6 holes in each side of the pieces to be
joined. Then I'm going to insert pieces of a paper clip into each
hole to act as reinforcement for the glue to adhere to much in the
same way rebar works in cement. Has anyone had any success with
this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will increase the surface
area of the connection. Any hints on making it work better? I'm
going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because it will
expand into the holes


Different product (soap dish) I cemented paper clips under and
across the broken pieces. I used Phenoseal ( great adhesive
caulking) to put all the parts together. It's been a few years
without failure. MLD


I had a plastic clamp for a clip-on fan break,and I used epoxy and
popsicle sticks to reinforce it;you have to let the epoxy cure for a
week or two before putting it under stress,to get it's full strength.
The clamp has a very strong spring,and it's held up for about two
years now. I used RAKA boat building epoxy and fumed silica
thickener. I tried J- B Weld before that,but it didn't hold up very
long.It seems to be a softer epoxy. System Three or West System epoxy
would do just as well as the RAKA.

The popsicle sticks are stiff and give more strength than a paper
clip will,and epoxy bonds to it better.

Polyurethane glues are crap.(Gorilla Glue)They also foam up,expand
and make a mess.For wood,I guess they are OK.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net


That's weird, I was doing some reading last night and it was
recommended to stay away from epoxy for plastic and then someone said
polyurethane worked great on plastic. Confusing. I guess all plastics
are different


You are right.

and some work best with poly and others with epoxy.I've
had great success with Gorilla Glue. I think the people who don't
aren't clamping the piece for 24 hrs.


Clamp plastic and you squeeze out the glue.
Poly works best with wood because it's designed to cure in the presence of
moisture already present in the wood.

I've had the same experience
you've had with JB Weld. Funny, I used it a decade ago to fix a crack
in my radiator that sealed it shut


sealing and -joining- are two different tasks.
You need more bond strength for joining.Lots more for stressed parts.

now I have a problem getting it to
join anything that is stressed, I wonder if they changed the formula.
I'll try the Raka stuff you mentioned, any clue on where I can
locally?



AFAIK,RAKA is only available online,West System and System Three are at
least equal and usually available locally(boat,woodworking shops),but
System Three online has an EXCELLENT trial kit for $10(last I
checked,awhile ago) postpaid,it also has generous samples of various
fillers,the great Epoxy Book,a wonderful guide to using epoxies(a MUST
read,IMO.),spreaders,mixing cups and sticks,and a big piece of fiberglass
cloth.It will have enough epoxy for your application.
**And I don't have any financial association with them.**

I have used their trial kit and loved it.I still have the trial
kit box,book,and some of the fillers.I also get glass cloth from a hobby
shop,you can get very light weight cloths(top finishing) or
heavier,stronger cloths.
You can also use strands from the glass cloth in your repair.

the plastic I dealt with was similar to Bakelite.

your fridge shelf is going to get a lot of weight put on it,and it WILL
need reinforcement.I would use the popsicle sticks,a bit of that glass
cloth on both top and bottom,build it up thick(on the bottom side),and cure
it for 2 weeks before putting it into the fridge.The Epoxy Book will really
help you in this repair,and you can DL it for free from the System Three
website even if you go with West System.

IIRC;www.systemthree.com.


--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
at
kua.net
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Oct 31, 3:31 pm, TH wrote:
On Oct 31, 6:12 am, Joe wrote:

My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


Might work or more likely a shelf collapse and a big mess. Sounds like
you just need new shelf supports. Probably not much more than the
price of the glue.
Try this:http://www.repairclinic.com/SmartSea...artsearch.aspx


That would be the day, when you can get replacement refrigerator parts
for the cost of glue. I'll bet you the price of the shelf is easily
an order of magnitude more $$$ than the cost of glue.

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf


"Joe" wrote in message
ups.com...
. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


On a scale of 1 to 10, I'd give it a 1 for success. I doubt it will take
the weight of the shelf, let alone a couple of jugs of milk. If you get
lucky, you may be able to find the parts at an appliance dealer that takes
old units away when they deliver the new ones.




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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Phisherman wrote in
:

On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 14:12:21 -0000, Joe wrote:

My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes



I tried something similar with disappointing results. Your mileage
might be better. Replacement shelves are way too expensive, So I'd
just do without the shelf until the refrigerator gets trashed. I have
good woodworking skills, so I'd construct a slotted shelf from white
oak.


Assuming the shelf itself broke, I was fortunate enough to be able to use
those plastic coated wire shelf racks you cut to length (Borg item). Got it
to fit in the existing clips fairly easily.

The rest of the old plated wire racks then looked like crap. Replaced them
all.

Have you tried duct tape? :-)


"It's only temporary, unless it works."
Red...
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Oct 31, 6:05 pm, wrote:
On Oct 31, 3:31 pm, TH wrote:



On Oct 31, 6:12 am, Joe wrote:


My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


Might work or more likely a shelf collapse and a big mess. Sounds like
you just need new shelf supports. Probably not much more than the
price of the glue.
Try this:http://www.repairclinic.com/SmartSea...artsearch.aspx


That would be the day, when you can get replacement refrigerator parts
for the cost of glue. I'll bet you the price of the shelf is easily
an order of magnitude more $$$ than the cost of glue.


Wasn't talking about the shelf. It wasn't clear if the shelf broke, or
just the supports. If he really just broke the supports, they're
cheap.

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

According to HotRdd :
You need to test a few spots to see what will hold. I love to use crazy glue
(Cyanoacrylate Adhesives) but it only works on certain plastics and
basically solvent welds them together. In some cases it's stronger than the
original bond.


CA doesn't solvent weld most plastics any more than it does on metal
or wood. It also isn't that good under continuous weight bearing duty
in either cold or hot temperatures, unless you get the really good
stuff (not the teensy tubes from a variety store), and even then it's
not so hot...

Best to do some tests. Even model airplane glue might just do the
trick depending on the plastic and careful application.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

According to Phisherman :
I tried something similar with disappointing results. Your mileage
might be better. Replacement shelves are way too expensive, So I'd
just do without the shelf until the refrigerator gets trashed.


Go to some of the more generic appliance parts dealers that are
online.

You may be pleasantly surprised.

--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 16:27:25 -0000, Chris Lewis wrote:


According to HotRdd :
You need to test a few spots to see what will hold. I love to use crazy glue
(Cyanoacrylate Adhesives) but it only works on certain plastics and
basically solvent welds them together. In some cases it's stronger than the
original bond.


CA doesn't solvent weld most plastics any more than it does on metal
or wood. It also isn't that good under continuous weight bearing duty

The only thing CA (superglue) works on is human skin. It is worthless
for everything else as it is too damn brittle.

Try acetone. It temporarilly disolves the plastic into a goo. Brush some
on the edge of both pieces. Touch to gooey sides together, and when it "dries"
it'll be a single piece of plastic.


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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

In article , AZ Nomad wrote:
The only thing CA (superglue) works on is human skin. It is worthless
for everything else as it is too damn brittle.


Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
| Gary Player. |
|
http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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According to AZ Nomad :
On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 16:27:25 -0000, Chris Lewis
wrote:


According to HotRdd :
You need to test a few spots to see what will hold. I love to use crazy glue
(Cyanoacrylate Adhesives) but it only works on certain plastics and
basically solvent welds them together. In some cases it's stronger than the
original bond.


CA doesn't solvent weld most plastics any more than it does on metal
or wood. It also isn't that good under continuous weight bearing duty

The only thing CA (superglue) works on is human skin. It is worthless
for everything else as it is too damn brittle.

Try acetone. It temporarilly disolves the plastic into a goo. Brush some
on the edge of both pieces. Touch to gooey sides together, and when it "dries"
it'll be a single piece of plastic.


Depends on the plastic. Model airplane glue is little more than
polystyrene dissolved in acetone to give it some body. If your
shelving is polystyrene (good chance), either acetone or model airplane
glue will work more or less the same, and model airplane glue is
easier to work with - won't dribble all over the place. Just
get fresh stuff - semi-congealed stuff won't work...

However, not all plastics are polystyrene. Acetone won't do a thing
to polyethylene for example. Essentially nothing will. Some plastics
just don't "glue". The "slippery ones" generally don't, no matter what
you use.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Oct 31, 10:12 am, Joe wrote:
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


If you have room, why not sandwich the broken pieces between two
pieces of material, such a lexan, drilling and bolting on both sides
of the crack. The new material would bear the weight, not the damaged
shelf.

Or, as so many have said...purchase or make a replacement shelf -
probably the best idea.

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf



Chris Lewis wrote:

....
Depends on the plastic. Model airplane glue is little more than
polystyrene dissolved in acetone to give it some body. If your
shelving is polystyrene (good chance),

....
Shelving is probably not polystyrene. Even citrus oils dissolve
polystyrene. It would not do to have refrigerator shelves marred
because you put oranges in the fridge.
Polystyrene (unless it is foamed) tends to be on the brittle side
(in my experience). Those clear plastic (brittle) disposable
beverage cups are polystyrene.

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

In article , Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!


What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.

--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
| Gary Player. |
|
http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 22:04:31 -0700, Smitty Two wrote:


In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:


On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 21:13:26 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:


In article
,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.

Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.


Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?


I've seen used medical screws. There isn't much similarity except the basic
function. Kind of like comparing a bottle rocket with a saturn booster.


So a medical screw is not a piece of metal that's been machined? What is
it, then?


It's not a piece of junk metal that was machined in two milliseconds.
Do you think a saturn booster is the same as a bottle rocket?


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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:

On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 22:04:31 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:


On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 21:13:26 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

In article
,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.

Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.

Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?

I've seen used medical screws. There isn't much similarity except the
basic
function. Kind of like comparing a bottle rocket with a saturn booster.


So a medical screw is not a piece of metal that's been machined? What is
it, then?


It's not a piece of junk metal that was machined in two milliseconds.
Do you think a saturn booster is the same as a bottle rocket?


No screw is machined in two milliseconds. We make sophisticated parts
out of exotic materials all the time. If you can't tell me the
difference between a medical screw and some other screw, then may I
assume you know of none? Your rocket analogy is silly.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

On Nov 2, 6:34 am, Smitty Two wrote:
In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:





On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 22:04:31 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:


On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 21:13:26 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:


In article
,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!


What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.


Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?


I've seen used medical screws. There isn't much similarity except the
basic
function. Kind of like comparing a bottle rocket with a saturn booster.


So a medical screw is not a piece of metal that's been machined? What is
it, then?


It's not a piece of junk metal that was machined in two milliseconds.
Do you think a saturn booster is the same as a bottle rocket?


No screw is machined in two milliseconds. We make sophisticated parts
out of exotic materials all the time. If you can't tell me the
difference between a medical screw and some other screw, then may I
assume you know of none? Your rocket analogy is silly.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -



The fact that screws used for surgery cost $1800 probably has a lot
less to do with the manufacturing and more to the std overhead added
on to anything done in a hospital today.

When I was in the ER in LA two years ago, I was taking Tylenol for
pain. The ER doctor suggested I use Motrin instead. I wasn't too
keen on switching, but she kept pushing it, and offered to give me
one. Finally, I said yes, without even thinking, because it was just
a common Motrin When I got the bill, they charged me $18 for one
Motrin tablet that I could have bought at a drug store an hour later
for 25 cents.

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf


Joe wrote:
My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


Aren't most plastic pieces inside refrigerators made of PVC? If so,
you want to use solvent, not glue, to fix them. Acetone or laquer
thinner will work, but hobby shops and electronics supplies. have
stuff made especially for gluing plastic models and TV cabinets.

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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Smitty Two writes:

In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

In article ,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.


Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.


Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?


Sometimes Google satisfies, sometimes it doesn't.
I couldn't verify the cost of the screws you indicate above
but I did see some of the screws are stainless steel and
some are titanium.

$1800 does seem a bit steep, even for titanium.
I'd guess there's a very low volume and a lot
of inspections, including xrays of the part involved though.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

Joe writes:

My wife put 2 cartons of milk on the same shelf and that proved to be
too much weight for it and both back corners snapped off in almost
identical pieces. I've never had success gluing two pieces of plastic
together to support weight but I'd like to try something different and
see if it works. I'm going to take my Dremel and drill about 6 holes
in each side of the pieces to be joined. Then I'm going to insert
pieces of a paper clip into each hole to act as reinforcement for the
glue to adhere to much in the same way rebar works in cement. Has
anyone had any success with this? I'm thinking if nothing else it will
increase the surface area of the connection. Any hints on making it
work better? I'm going to use Gorilla Glue to join the pieces because
it will expand into the holes


Back when I was young and poor I had this happen
and fixed the shelf with a sheet of glass cut to size.
Just some old glass from a door we had in the attic.
Worked for years.
A mirror would be good too.

I doubt any repair will hold up.
You should be able to get a new part from the
manufacturer.


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On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 14:49:50 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:


Smitty Two writes:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

In article ,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.

Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.


Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?


Sometimes Google satisfies, sometimes it doesn't.
I couldn't verify the cost of the screws you indicate above
but I did see some of the screws are stainless steel and
some are titanium.


$1800 does seem a bit steep, even for titanium.
I'd guess there's a very low volume and a lot
of inspections, including xrays of the part involved though.


I'd like to see smitty get his ankle smashed into a thousand pieces and then
have his doc use some bigbox hardware store home construction screws. After
all, all screws are the same.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

In article , Dan Espen wrote:

Sometimes Google satisfies, sometimes it doesn't.
I couldn't verify the cost of the screws you indicate above
but I did see some of the screws are stainless steel and
some are titanium.

$1800 does seem a bit steep, even for titanium.
I'd guess there's a very low volume and a lot
of inspections, including xrays of the part involved though.


The bureaucratic regulations for medical devices are
likely responsible for much of the cost.

--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
| Gary Player. |
|
http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Default Screwing a broken ankle

In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:

On Fri, 02 Nov 2007 14:49:50 -0400, Dan Espen
wrote:


Smitty Two writes:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

In article
,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around the
house works great for wounds.

Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.

Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that the
bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how screws are
made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?


Sometimes Google satisfies, sometimes it doesn't.
I couldn't verify the cost of the screws you indicate above
but I did see some of the screws are stainless steel and
some are titanium.


$1800 does seem a bit steep, even for titanium.
I'd guess there's a very low volume and a lot
of inspections, including xrays of the part involved though.


I'd like to see smitty get his ankle smashed into a thousand pieces and then
have his doc use some bigbox hardware store home construction screws. After
all, all screws are the same.


I find it curious that you insist on being so irrational. When did I say
that all screws were the same? I didn't attack or insult you, all I did
was ask you to substantiate your claim that a surgical screw is as
different from a hardware store screw as a space rocket is from a bottle
rocket.

You're the one who claimed to have seen a surgical screw, and said it
was completely different. If you want me to believe that, you're going
to have to tell me in what ways it's different. There are one cent
screws and there are $20 screws. Have you ever made a screw? Seen one
being made? Now tell me what it is, exactly, that makes a surgical screw
worth $1800, outside of all the bureaucracy that's involved, as others
pointed out.

Incidentally, my mom shattered all the bones in her ankle in 1953.
Doctors said she'd never walk again, which she did, without the
slightest limp, for another forty years. I'm guessing there were no
$1800 screws involved, even adjusted for inflation.
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Default Glueing a broken plastic refrigerator shelf

AZ Nomad wrote in
:

On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 22:04:31 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
AZ Nomad wrote:


On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 21:13:26 -0700, Smitty Two
wrote:


In article ,
(Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

In article
,
Smitty Two wrote:
Yeah, but it does work well on skin! I recently discovered how
well when my 7 year old fell and made a nice gash on his nose
that I thought would need stitches. Off to the E.R. where they
stuck him back together with (medical grade) superglue. Within
about 10 days the would healed perfectly with no trace of a
scar. The Doc was right -- much better than stitches!

What's medical grade CA? Is that $3 dimestore glue that's been
repackaged and sold for $300? The standard stuff you have around
the house works great for wounds.

Well, pretty much. Of course, the vendor probably had to
spend many millions getting FDA approval and satisfying
all kinds of requirements relating to manufacturing,
distribution, packaging, advertising and everything else.

Yeah. I dated an orthopedic surgeon for a while, and she swore that
the bone screws cost $1800 per copy. I also know, first hand, how
screws are made. Anyone wanna pony up some venture capital?

I've seen used medical screws. There isn't much similarity except
the basic function. Kind of like comparing a bottle rocket with a
saturn booster.


So a medical screw is not a piece of metal that's been machined? What
is it, then?


It's not a piece of junk metal that was machined in two milliseconds.
Do you think a saturn booster is the same as a bottle rocket?


I dunno. But whatever they use to hold those shuttle tiles on I wouldn't
use on the chair.
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