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Old January 15th 21, 05:46 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one: https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

One key structural difference (the other being the leg bearing - I am
using 3/4" IMC) is that I won't be using the bottom shelf, so I will
need a method to brace the legs from both hyper-extending and folding
inwards during use. The dimensions of my table are 76" x 32", and it
will sit 36" high.

The method I would *like* to use is a diagonal brace (aluminum angle,
1.5" x 1.5" x 0.125") on each leg, extending from a point on the leg to
a point attached to the bottom of the table using 5/16" bolts.

Here is my question: how short of a brace can I reasonably expect to
get away with? It would be convenient if the brace were able to
disconnect at one point and fold up with the table. In this case, the
brace would need to be about 20 inches long and attach to each leg at a
point about 14 inches from the bottom of the table.

Considering the size of the table, the length of the legs, and it's use
as a utility worktable in the garage, does this length of diagonal (and
it's attachment point on the leg being 14" from the bottom of the table)
seem reasonable or woefully undersized?

Thanks for any perspective you can offer on this.


Jon

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Old January 15th 21, 02:08 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

On 1/14/2021 11:46 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:
I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one:¬* https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

One key structural difference (the other being the leg bearing - I am
using 3/4" IMC) is that I won't be using the bottom shelf, so I will
need a method to brace the legs from both hyper-extending and folding
inwards during use.¬* The dimensions of my table are 76" x 32", and it
will sit 36" high.

The method I would *like* to use is a diagonal brace (aluminum angle,
1.5" x 1.5" x 0.125") on each leg, extending from a point on the leg to
a point attached to the bottom of the table using 5/16" bolts.

Here is my question:¬* how short of a brace can I reasonably expect to
get away with?¬* It would be convenient if the brace were able to
disconnect at one point and fold up with the table.¬* In this case, the
brace would need to be about 20 inches long and attach to each leg at a
point about 14 inches from the bottom of the table.

Considering the size of the table, the length of the legs, and it's use
as a utility worktable in the garage, does this length of diagonal (and
it's attachment point on the leg being 14" from the bottom of the table)
seem reasonable or woefully undersized?

Thanks for any perspective you can offer on this.


Jon

We have a plastic folding table that is similar to the design of yours.

The diagonal brace is folds in the middle. and attaches to the leg about
half way to the distance to the floor.

https://www.bjs.com/product/lifetime...00000000471184

On most tables I have seen of this type the brace overlaps the pivot
point (like an "X") and a ring slip over the joint preventing it from
collapsing. With the slant of the brace the ring automatically slide
into position as the table is opened.

These folding tables are quite common and you can probably see one to
inspect at your local Church, store, or club house.

While your table will be quite sturdy, it will also be quite heavy with
about 35' of 2X4 plus the fastening.

The one handle handle may not be sufficient to lift it.


With our plastic table of about the same dimensions, it is quite
difficult and cumbersome to move folded table.

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Old January 15th 21, 02:27 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2010
Posts: 157
Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

On 1/15/2021 8:08 AM, knuttle wrote:
On 1/14/2021 11:46 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:
I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one:¬* https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

One key structural difference (the other being the leg bearing - I am
using 3/4" IMC) is that I won't be using the bottom shelf, so I will
need a method to brace the legs from both hyper-extending and folding
inwards during use.¬* The dimensions of my table are 76" x 32", and it
will sit 36" high.

The method I would *like* to use is a diagonal brace (aluminum angle,
1.5" x 1.5" x 0.125") on each leg, extending from a point on the leg
to a point attached to the bottom of the table using 5/16" bolts.

Here is my question:¬* how short of a brace can I reasonably expect to
get away with?¬* It would be convenient if the brace were able to
disconnect at one point and fold up with the table.¬* In this case, the
brace would need to be about 20 inches long and attach to each leg at
a point about 14 inches from the bottom of the table.

Considering the size of the table, the length of the legs, and it's
use as a utility worktable in the garage, does this length of diagonal
(and it's attachment point on the leg being 14" from the bottom of the
table) seem reasonable or woefully undersized?

Thanks for any perspective you can offer on this.


Jon

We have a plastic folding table that is similar to the design of yours.

The diagonal brace is folds in the middle. and attaches to the leg about
half way to the distance to the floor.

https://www.bjs.com/product/lifetime...00000000471184


On most tables I have seen of this type the brace overlaps the pivot
point¬* (like an "X") and a ring slip over the joint preventing it from
collapsing.¬* With the slant of the brace the ring automatically slide
into position as the table is opened.

These folding tables are quite common and you can probably see one to
inspect at your local Church, store, or club house.

While your table will be quite sturdy, it will also be quite heavy with
about 35' of 2X4 plus the fastening.

The one handle handle may not be sufficient to lift it.


With our plastic table of about the same dimensions, it is quite
difficult and cumbersome to move folded table.

If you have a space problem, you could consider what my father did.

After making the collapsable table, he put an "L" shaped rail on the
side of his garage. When he was finished with the table he would move
it to the rail, lift it onto the rail, and fold it up against the wall.

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Old January 15th 21, 03:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

On Thursday, January 14, 2021 at 11:47:03 PM UTC-5, Jon Danniken wrote:
I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one: https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

One key structural difference (the other being the leg bearing - I am
using 3/4" IMC) is that I won't be using the bottom shelf, so I will
need a method to brace the legs from both hyper-extending and folding
inwards during use. The dimensions of my table are 76" x 32", and it
will sit 36" high.

The method I would *like* to use is a diagonal brace (aluminum angle,
1.5" x 1.5" x 0.125") on each leg, extending from a point on the leg to
a point attached to the bottom of the table using 5/16" bolts.

Here is my question: how short of a brace can I reasonably expect to
get away with? It would be convenient if the brace were able to
disconnect at one point and fold up with the table. In this case, the
brace would need to be about 20 inches long and attach to each leg at a
point about 14 inches from the bottom of the table.

Considering the size of the table, the length of the legs, and it's use
as a utility worktable in the garage, does this length of diagonal (and
it's attachment point on the leg being 14" from the bottom of the table)
seem reasonable or woefully undersized?

Thanks for any perspective you can offer on this.


Jon


Just so we all understand your plan...

The image you supplied shows a bench with not only a bottom shelf, but
also stretchers between the legs to support the shelf, as well as stretchers
on the floor.

Are you planning on eliminating both the shelf and all the stretchers?


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Old January 15th 21, 05:32 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2017
Posts: 47
Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

Jon Danniken wrote:
I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one: https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

One key structural difference (the other being the leg bearing - I am
using 3/4" IMC) is that I won't be using the bottom shelf, so I will
need a method to brace the legs from both hyper-extending and folding
inwards during use. The dimensions of my table are 76" x 32", and it
will sit 36" high.

The method I would *like* to use is a diagonal brace (aluminum angle,
1.5" x 1.5" x 0.125") on each leg, extending from a point on the leg to
a point attached to the bottom of the table using 5/16" bolts.

Here is my question: how short of a brace can I reasonably expect to
get away with? It would be convenient if the brace were able to
disconnect at one point and fold up with the table. In this case, the
brace would need to be about 20 inches long and attach to each leg at a
point about 14 inches from the bottom of the table.

Considering the size of the table, the length of the legs, and it's use
as a utility worktable in the garage, does this length of diagonal (and
it's attachment point on the leg being 14" from the bottom of the table)
seem reasonable or woefully undersized?

Thanks for any perspective you can offer on this.


Jon

Make the bottom shelf sitting on pins so it can be lifted off.
Top of legs rounded so the legs can fold inward.
Put a diagonal brace to the lower legs from the top attached with wing
nuts for easy removal.

--
G Ross


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Old January 15th 21, 07:04 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2020
Posts: 14
Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

On 1/15/21 8:53 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Thursday, January 14, 2021 at 11:47:03 PM UTC-5, Jon Danniken wrote:
I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one: https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

snip


Just so we all understand your plan...

The image you supplied shows a bench with not only a bottom shelf, but
also stretchers between the legs to support the shelf, as well as stretchers
on the floor.

Are you planning on eliminating both the shelf and all the stretchers?


No, I will be keeping two stretchers (although not one on the *very*
bottom); I'm just losing the shelf.

Jon

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Old January 15th 21, 07:07 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2020
Posts: 14
Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

On 1/15/21 7:27 AM, knuttle wrote:
On 1/15/2021 8:08 AM, knuttle wrote:
On 1/14/2021 11:46 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:
I am putting together a folding worktable based on a concept such as
this one:¬* https://ibb.co/MgWrWrd

snip

We have a plastic folding table that is similar to the design of yours.

The diagonal brace is folds in the middle. and attaches to the leg
about half way to the distance to the floor.

https://www.bjs.com/product/lifetime...00000000471184


On most tables I have seen of this type the brace overlaps the pivot
point¬* (like an "X") and a ring slip over the joint preventing it from
collapsing.¬* With the slant of the brace the ring automatically slide
into position as the table is opened.

These folding tables are quite common and you can probably see one to
inspect at your local Church, store, or club house.

While your table will be quite sturdy, it will also be quite heavy
with about 35' of 2X4 plus the fastening.

The one handle handle may not be sufficient to lift it.


With our plastic table of about the same dimensions, it is quite
difficult and cumbersome to move folded table.

If you have a space problem, you could consider what my father did.

After making the collapsable table, he put an "L" shaped rail on the
side of his garage.¬* When he was finished with the table he would move
it to the rail, lift it onto the rail, and fold it up against the wall.


Thanks Knuttle, I'm not going to be using the handle it would just get
in the way; this thing will be too big and heavy to walk around like a
suitcase.

Jon

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Old January 15th 21, 08:39 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2020
Posts: 14
Default Diagonal leg bracing for folding worktable

On 1/15/21 7:27 AM, knuttle wrote:

We have a plastic folding table that is similar to the design of yours.

The diagonal brace is folds in the middle. and attaches to the leg
about half way to the distance to the floor.

https://www.bjs.com/product/lifetime...00000000471184


On most tables I have seen of this type the brace overlaps the pivot
point¬* (like an "X") and a ring slip over the joint preventing it from
collapsing.¬* With the slant of the brace the ring automatically slide
into position as the table is opened.

These folding tables are quite common and you can probably see one to
inspect at your local Church, store, or club house.

While your table will be quite sturdy, it will also be quite heavy
with about 35' of 2X4 plus the fastening.

The one handle handle may not be sufficient to lift it.


With our plastic table of about the same dimensions, it is quite
difficult and cumbersome to move folded table.

If you have a space problem, you could consider what my father did.

After making the collapsable table, he put an "L" shaped rail on the
side of his garage.¬* When he was finished with the table he would move
it to the rail, lift it onto the rail, and fold it up against the wall.


I actually have a set of banquet table legs I was originally going to
use for this project (they have been obsoleted due to lack of strength
and being too short). I did notice that they have a folding diagonal
support, but I originally disregarded that design due to the complexity.

Now that I am thinking about it, it's basically just a "one strut"
support with a bolt in the middle so that the two pieces can fold in on
each other. That would solve my problem of length and actually be
easier to assemble as well.

Thanks for the nudge.

Jon



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