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Old February 10th 19, 04:24 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi..

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Old February 11th 19, 02:19 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.


And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc


How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.

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Old February 11th 19, 04:01 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.


And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc


How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.


It may have shattered without pressure but it wouldn't have exploded,
throwing shrapnel. No thanks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.


No, not at all but you're welcome to experiment with your life.
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Old February 11th 19, 11:59 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 13,988
Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 11:02:25 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.

And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc


How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.


It may have shattered without pressure but it wouldn't have exploded,
throwing shrapnel. No thanks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.


No, not at all but you're welcome to experiment with your life.


Nothing I said indicated that I plan to use PVC for high pressure air or that I
suggest anybody should.

There's a big difference between pointing out bad examples vs. disagreeing that
with the main concept. Just because those videos do a terrible job of explaining
why you shouldn't use PVC with air doesn't mean that you should.

For example, if that second video had given any indication of what PSI caused the
failures they would be perfect. Since they don't, we have no idea if the test resembled
real world conditions or were just done for effect.

In other words, they weren't very "instructive" other than to proof that you can indeed cause
PVC to shatter while under pressure. Freezing the pipe apparently helps too..


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Old February 11th 19, 02:55 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 13,988
Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 11:02:25 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 wrote:


....snip...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.


No, not at all but you're welcome to experiment with your life.


Here you go...

How about I post this video with the warning "Never, ever, ever fill
your tires at a gas station!". I'll make sure I label it as "instructive".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeKA0eImhWQ

I'm pretty sure that you, being the intelligent gent that you are, would
be one of the first to point out that we know very little about the root
cause of that explosion. Our *experience* tells us that the situation is
out of the ordinary, therefore we wouldn't consider the video to be
"instructive" as it relates to the "Never, ever, ever" warning given.

Regarding the PVC video linked to above, we don't know if they tested that
PVC with 60 PSI or 600 PSI. To be considered "instructive" (and that *word*
is the only thing that I'm talking about) the video needs to tell us
something about the test conditions.

To be clear, I am *not* recommending or even suggesting that PVC be used
for air under any conditions. My only point is whether or not those videos
can be considered "instructive" in the context used.
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Old February 11th 19, 09:38 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 2,090
Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.


And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc


How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.



Oregon OSHA states

Plastic pipe used for compressed air service must be designed for such
service by the
manufacturer. Examples of such pipe include high-density polyethylene
(HDPE) and
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). Compressed air piping systems
that use plastic
pipe must also be “project specific” – i.e., suited for a particular
application or project –
and installed by a competent person.
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe must not be used in
compressed air systems unless it is buried or encased.
PVC pipes are unsafe when
they’re used for compressed
air service because they can
shatter or explode under
pressure or from an external
force. Sunlight (the UV
component) can also reduce
the impact resistance of PVC
pipe.

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Old February 11th 19, 10:23 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 448
Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 3:38:24 PM UTC-6, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.

And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc


How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.



Oregon OSHA states

Plastic pipe used for compressed air service must be designed for such
service by the
manufacturer. Examples of such pipe include high-density polyethylene
(HDPE) and
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). Compressed air piping systems
that use plastic
pipe must also be “project specific” – i.e., suited for a particular
application or project –
and installed by a competent person.
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe must not be used in
compressed air systems unless it is buried or encased.
PVC pipes are unsafe when
they’re used for compressed
air service because they can
shatter or explode under
pressure or from an external
force. Sunlight (the UV
component) can also reduce
the impact resistance of PVC
pipe.


I tend to think of ABS and PVC pipe as being the same. My usage of either pipe is with plumbing. Hard to believe ABS is compressed air compliant but PVC is not. Seems to me both would not be compliant.
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Old February 11th 19, 10:27 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 13,988
Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 4:38:24 PM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.

And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc


How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0


How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.



Oregon OSHA states

Plastic pipe used for compressed air service must be designed for such
service by the
manufacturer. Examples of such pipe include high-density polyethylene
(HDPE) and
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS). Compressed air piping systems
that use plastic
pipe must also be “project specific” – i.e., suited for a particular
application or project –
and installed by a competent person.
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe must not be used in
compressed air systems unless it is buried or encased.
PVC pipes are unsafe when
they’re used for compressed
air service because they can
shatter or explode under
pressure or from an external
force. Sunlight (the UV
component) can also reduce
the impact resistance of PVC
pipe.


All true, and had *any* of that been included in the videos, then they could
have been considered "instructive".

You do understand that my only issue is with the use of the "instructive"
descriptor, right? Neither of those videos are "instructive" in my opinion.

Sensational? Sure. Condescending? The second one, yep. Instructive? Not
so much.
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Old February 12th 19, 03:10 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2016
Posts: 1,805
Default PEX For Shop Air Lines?

On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 03:59:10 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 11:02:25 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 18:19:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:25:06 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 08:24:31 -0800 (PST),
wrote:

I just bought a 100-foot air line from Harbor Freight and snaked that through the walls from the garage to the basement shop. I added a moisture trap and a regulator at the basement end. The compressor runs at 125 psi and I can cut down the pressure in the shop to anything I need for pin nailers, etc. This is really convenient and probably cost less and took less effort than any kind of plumbing.
That being said, a friend used ordinary CPVC pipe which is rated at 200 psi.

And he may luck out and move before it breaks, or he may luck out and
there not be anybody near it when it breaks. You might find a couple
of videos instructive:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVO4_hUvFsc

How instructive is a video that shows that they couldn't get the PVC to
shatter until they battered it numerous times with a weight of an unspecified
amount from a height of 12' and then *froze* the frigging thing?

For all we know, it would have shattered at 0 PSI after taking all that
abuse and then being frozen. Heck, for all we know, it would have shattered
the *first time* at 0 PSI once it was frozen. Bad example.


It may have shattered without pressure but it wouldn't have exploded,
throwing shrapnel. No thanks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1x1UxbD7B0

How instructive is a video of some guy who says nothing more than "Don't
do it" without anything to back up his words other than some videos of PVC
bursting after being subjected to...oh, wait...we have absolutely no idea
what it was subjected to. Bad example.


No, not at all but you're welcome to experiment with your life.


Nothing I said indicated that I plan to use PVC for high pressure air or that I
suggest anybody should.


That *was* the subject.

There's a big difference between pointing out bad examples vs. disagreeing that
with the main concept. Just because those videos do a terrible job of explaining
why you shouldn't use PVC with air doesn't mean that you should.

For example, if that second video had given any indication of what PSI caused the
failures they would be perfect. Since they don't, we have no idea if the test resembled
real world conditions or were just done for effect.

In other words, they weren't very "instructive" other than to proof that you can indeed cause
PVC to shatter while under pressure. Freezing the pipe apparently helps too.


Except that I don't want to be anywhere around it when it does. That's
good enough for me. You welcome to risk your life foolishly.


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