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Old May 14th 04, 01:32 AM
mttt
 
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"Swingman" wrote in message
...

Wasn't/isn't Valentines Day a religious celebration, besides being the
epitome of a "marketing gimmick"?


And whaddabout Thanksgiving? Right - not a "holiday" until mid 1800's, IIRC?
Seem to recall Geo Washington was hot about it, but it languised until a
magazine editor made it her crusade.



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Old May 14th 04, 01:53 AM
Charlie Self
 
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Swingman writes:

only ones I can think of are MLK and Veteran's Days - and the later may
be slipping into the muck.


Yep ... it seems that somehow my daughters have the idea that they must give
me flowers on Veteran's Day now. Where on earth that came from ... never
mind, I can guess.


Oh, lord. Please, no.

Wasn't/isn't Valentines Day a religious celebration, besides being the
epitome of a "marketing gimmick"?


Yeah, but I think the major observation that we have today is all marketing.
Same with Halloween. When I was a wee bit younger, Halloween was an evening
when you wore burnt cork on your face and old sheets on your body, with ribs
drawn with cork. Made a helluva fine ghost. Now, costumes cost the earth, and
every parent fears razor blades in apples and worse in candies.

Charlie Self
"In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence
is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of
office." Ambrose Bierce

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Old May 14th 04, 02:54 AM
 
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On Thu, 13 May 2004 14:24:15 -0500, "Swingman" wrote:


wrote in message
On Thu, 13 May 2004 07:30:48 -0500, "Swingman" wrote:


wrote in message

sounds like a marketing gimmick to me.

No doubt by the same folks who insist that kwanza and cinco de mayo are
"traditional American holidays".




around here (tucson) cinco de mayo is a big deal. really....


Probably bigger here in Texas ... BUT, it is a Mexican holiday, not an
American one, and still only a "marketing gimmick" in the latter ... at
least until we start celebrating Bastille day too, out of political
correctness.




tucson was part of mexico not all that long ago. there are still
plenty of families here who were here, then.
  #24   Report Post  
Old May 14th 04, 02:54 AM
 
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On Thu, 13 May 2004 14:34:21 -0700, Fly-by-Night CC
wrote:

In article , "George" [email protected]
wrote:

If you think "Hispanic" means Mexican, I guess you have a point. It
celebrates the defeat of Maximilian's forces in 1862, by those loyal to
Diaz.


Someone of Spanish descent recently explained that in general terms,
Hispanic refers to Mexican decent or origin while Latino generally
refers to all of the primarily Spanish speaking countries of North,
Central and South America. I don't know if that's a universal generality
but it sorta made sense to me.




IIRC, the word "hispanic" was made up by the nixon administration to
refer to anyone in the western hemisphere who natively speaks spanish.
thus it refers to mexicans, chileans and most of the rest of south
america, but not to brazillians, who speak portugese.
  #25   Report Post  
Old May 14th 04, 02:06 PM
George
 
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Or, once again, we could take advantage of this reference library that
begins with www.

http://www.dailyillini.com/feb03/feb..._story11.shtml
http://www.som.tulane.edu/thhi/tminol.htm

Seem to echo the consensus, with the additional joy of letting "nons" know
that they can never get it right.

So get a clue, all you WOPs, Micks and Polacks....

wrote in message
...
On Thu, 13 May 2004 14:34:21 -0700, Fly-by-Night CC
wrote:

In article , "George" [email protected]
wrote:

If you think "Hispanic" means Mexican, I guess you have a point. It
celebrates the defeat of Maximilian's forces in 1862, by those loyal to
Diaz.


Someone of Spanish descent recently explained that in general terms,
Hispanic refers to Mexican decent or origin while Latino generally
refers to all of the primarily Spanish speaking countries of North,
Central and South America. I don't know if that's a universal generality
but it sorta made sense to me.




IIRC, the word "hispanic" was made up by the nixon administration to
refer to anyone in the western hemisphere who natively speaks spanish.
thus it refers to mexicans, chileans and most of the rest of south
america, but not to brazillians, who speak portugese.





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Old May 14th 04, 02:21 PM
J. Clarke
 
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davidmc wrote:

the SWMBO was at an antique show today and saw a piece of furniture
that was labeled "flashed oak." She said it was striped, with
extremely strong contrast between the light and the dark stripes as if
it were zebrawood. Is anyone familiar with this? Why is it called
"flashed"? And is it the result of the type of oak used or is it a
type of finish (and if the latter, how do you do it?) I haven't seen
any references to this by googling the web or this newsgroup.


Sicne the discussion seems to have degenerated, I'm going to stick my neck
out and suggest the possibility that it might be "fumed" oak which was
commonplace in arts-and-crafts furniture.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  #27   Report Post  
Old May 14th 04, 05:54 PM
The Guy
 
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J. Clarke wrote:

davidmc wrote:


the SWMBO was at an antique show today and saw a piece of furniture
that was labeled "flashed oak." She said it was striped, with
extremely strong contrast between the light and the dark stripes as if
it were zebrawood. Is anyone familiar with this? Why is it called
"flashed"? And is it the result of the type of oak used or is it a
type of finish (and if the latter, how do you do it?) I haven't seen
any references to this by googling the web or this newsgroup.



Sicne the discussion seems to have degenerated, I'm going to stick my neck
out and suggest the possibility that it might be "fumed" oak which was
commonplace in arts-and-crafts furniture.


Gee, and I was thinking it might have been from a little guy with a
trench coat at the lumber yard.

Tim
--
No BoomBoom for me! -

  #28   Report Post  
Old May 15th 04, 12:05 AM
Swingman
 
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"mttt" wrote in message
...

"Swingman" wrote in message
...


You might want to watch your quotes ... I did not write that.


Oops! Apologies!
[ OK if I blame Outlook??? ]


No problem ... I'll file suit immediately. MSFT may have some crumbs
leftover from that recent $250,000,000 legal bill. ;)


--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/13/04


  #29   Report Post  
Old May 17th 04, 05:26 PM
Eddie Munster
 
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Probably what I saw on saturday in an antique place. They called it
"flame oak". It was just quartersawn and looked good.

davidmc wrote:

the SWMBO was at an antique show today and saw a piece of furniture
that was labeled "flashed oak." She said it was striped, with
extremely strong contrast between the light and the dark stripes as if
it were zebrawood. Is anyone familiar with this? Why is it called
"flashed"? And is it the result of the type of oak used or is it a
type of finish (and if the latter, how do you do it?) I haven't seen
any references to this by googling the web or this newsgroup.




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