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Old September 18th 03, 08:27 PM
vegasdave
 
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Default wood flooring tiles

I want to make my own flooring tiles from wood and install them as you
would any other flooring tile. I would be intalling them on a solid
concrete subfloor. Is this possible? Would I be able to use grout, or
is there a special grouting material that I would use? Would I use
construction adhesive or thinset to lay the tiles? Would I seal them
with marine varnish, or would a urethane coating be sufficient?
Any advice on this topic would be appreciated. I like tile, love
wood, and hate parkay flooring. This idea seemed the best of both
worlds. Please help.

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Old September 18th 03, 08:38 PM
JackD
 
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Default wood flooring tiles

Not a good idea.
Wood changes dimension as the water content changes.
Because of this wood floors are not made of wooden tiles.
If they were then gaps would open when the floor dried and it might/would
buckle if it got too wet.

Now, that being said, IF you put down some sort of barrier so any moisture
in the concrete could not find it's way into the wood, and IF you used a
flexible grout (really a sealant) which had elastic properties sufficient to
allow the movement of the wood then it would be OK. I'm guessing that you
would end up with something like a bunch of wood stuck in a puddle of
sikaflex. Maintaining it with the combination of wood and flexible sealant
would be a problem - as would refinishing it since the sander would not like
the sealant at all.

My advice, stick to the traditional methods of installing wooden flooring.

-Jack

"vegasdave" wrote in message
om...
I want to make my own flooring tiles from wood and install them as you
would any other flooring tile. I would be intalling them on a solid
concrete subfloor. Is this possible? Would I be able to use grout, or
is there a special grouting material that I would use? Would I use
construction adhesive or thinset to lay the tiles? Would I seal them
with marine varnish, or would a urethane coating be sufficient?
Any advice on this topic would be appreciated. I like tile, love
wood, and hate parkay flooring. This idea seemed the best of both
worlds. Please help.



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Old September 18th 03, 08:53 PM
Herman Family
 
Posts: n/a
Default wood flooring tiles

You might consider putting down a moisture barrier, then 1x2s on 16" centers
with foam insulation between them, followed by some subflooring and finally
put your tiles down in the usual manner. The upshot of it all is you want
to remove the tiles from the vagaries of concrete, and put them in a wood
friendly environment.

Michael
"vegasdave" wrote in message
om...
I want to make my own flooring tiles from wood and install them as you
would any other flooring tile. I would be intalling them on a solid
concrete subfloor. Is this possible? Would I be able to use grout, or
is there a special grouting material that I would use? Would I use
construction adhesive or thinset to lay the tiles? Would I seal them
with marine varnish, or would a urethane coating be sufficient?
Any advice on this topic would be appreciated. I like tile, love
wood, and hate parkay flooring. This idea seemed the best of both
worlds. Please help.



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Old September 18th 03, 09:35 PM
Rob Stokes
 
Posts: n/a
Default wood flooring tiles

Hmmm, interesting. While I agree in principle, just the other day on the way
home from work, I passed a road construction crew. I know, I know, what the
hell does this have to do with anything but wait......

Looking at the "cross section" of the ditch dug down the middle of the road,
it became apparent that the asphalt had been placed over the original
cobblestones. The original cobblestones were wood blocks placed on end...and
they were still there.

Must be something to it.

Rob


"JackD" wrote in message ...
Not a good idea.
Wood changes dimension as the water content changes.
Because of this wood floors are not made of wooden tiles.
If they were then gaps would open when the floor dried and it might/would
buckle if it got too wet.

Now, that being said, IF you put down some sort of barrier so any moisture
in the concrete could not find it's way into the wood, and IF you used a
flexible grout (really a sealant) which had elastic properties sufficient

to
allow the movement of the wood then it would be OK. I'm guessing that you
would end up with something like a bunch of wood stuck in a puddle of
sikaflex. Maintaining it with the combination of wood and flexible sealant
would be a problem - as would refinishing it since the sander would not

like
the sealant at all.

My advice, stick to the traditional methods of installing wooden flooring.

-Jack

"vegasdave" wrote in message
om...
I want to make my own flooring tiles from wood and install them as you
would any other flooring tile. I would be intalling them on a solid
concrete subfloor. Is this possible? Would I be able to use grout, or
is there a special grouting material that I would use? Would I use
construction adhesive or thinset to lay the tiles? Would I seal them
with marine varnish, or would a urethane coating be sufficient?
Any advice on this topic would be appreciated. I like tile, love
wood, and hate parkay flooring. This idea seemed the best of both
worlds. Please help.





  #5   Report Post  
Old September 18th 03, 10:46 PM
Herman Family
 
Posts: n/a
Default wood flooring tiles

If you want a very tough floor, then end grain up wood is among the
toughest. I've seen that in a railroad barn once. I don't know how the
wood has survived so long. It might be interesting to ask the road crew or
the transportation department what sort of wood was used.

Michael
"Rob Stokes" wrote in message
s.com...
Hmmm, interesting. While I agree in principle, just the other day on the

way
home from work, I passed a road construction crew. I know, I know, what

the
hell does this have to do with anything but wait......

Looking at the "cross section" of the ditch dug down the middle of the

road,
it became apparent that the asphalt had been placed over the original
cobblestones. The original cobblestones were wood blocks placed on

end...and
they were still there.

Must be something to it.

Rob


"JackD" wrote in message ...
Not a good idea.
Wood changes dimension as the water content changes.
Because of this wood floors are not made of wooden tiles.
If they were then gaps would open when the floor dried and it

might/would
buckle if it got too wet.

Now, that being said, IF you put down some sort of barrier so any

moisture
in the concrete could not find it's way into the wood, and IF you used a
flexible grout (really a sealant) which had elastic properties

sufficient
to
allow the movement of the wood then it would be OK. I'm guessing that

you
would end up with something like a bunch of wood stuck in a puddle of
sikaflex. Maintaining it with the combination of wood and flexible

sealant
would be a problem - as would refinishing it since the sander would not

like
the sealant at all.

My advice, stick to the traditional methods of installing wooden

flooring.

-Jack

"vegasdave" wrote in message
om...
I want to make my own flooring tiles from wood and install them as you
would any other flooring tile. I would be intalling them on a solid
concrete subfloor. Is this possible? Would I be able to use grout, or
is there a special grouting material that I would use? Would I use
construction adhesive or thinset to lay the tiles? Would I seal them
with marine varnish, or would a urethane coating be sufficient?
Any advice on this topic would be appreciated. I like tile, love
wood, and hate parkay flooring. This idea seemed the best of both
worlds. Please help.









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Old September 18th 03, 10:50 PM
Frank Nakashima
 
Posts: n/a
Default wood flooring tiles


"Herman Family" /without_any_s/ wrote in
message ...
If you want a very tough floor, then end grain up wood is among the
toughest. I've seen that in a railroad barn once. I don't know how

the
wood has survived so long. It might be interesting to ask the road

crew or
the transportation department what sort of wood was used.


They did that on some show - I think it was one of Bob Vila's Home
Again. One of the first seasons I think. They laid them as tiles in a
running bond and grouted them with something like sawdust and varnish.
It looked pretty slick - like wooden cobblestones.


  #7   Report Post  
Old September 19th 03, 05:40 AM
Leuf
 
Posts: n/a
Default wood flooring tiles

On Thu, 18 Sep 2003 21:50:00 GMT, "Frank Nakashima"
wrote:


"Herman Family" /without_any_s/ wrote in
message ...
If you want a very tough floor, then end grain up wood is among the
toughest. I've seen that in a railroad barn once. I don't know how

the
wood has survived so long. It might be interesting to ask the road

crew or
the transportation department what sort of wood was used.


They did that on some show - I think it was one of Bob Vila's Home
Again. One of the first seasons I think. They laid them as tiles in a
running bond and grouted them with something like sawdust and varnish.
It looked pretty slick - like wooden cobblestones.


Good memory,

http://www.bobvila.com/wwwboard/messages/76623.html
http://www.bobvila.com/wwwboard/messages/6438.html


-Leuf
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Old September 19th 03, 02:47 PM
Alan McClure
 
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Default wood flooring tiles



Herman Family wrote:

If you want a very tough floor, then end grain up wood is among the
toughest. I've seen that in a railroad barn once. I don't know how the
wood has survived so long. It might be interesting to ask the road crew or
the transportation department what sort of wood was used.

Michael


This type of floor is quite common in manufacturing plants where dropping
a valuable piece of metal on concrete would be disastrous. Tire plants and
plants that make tire molds have acres of block floors.

The blocks are creosote or tar soaked oak 4" long set on end. No glue or
grout is used, the blocks are just wedged in. The man replacing a section
of floor uses a hatchet, wide chisel, and a mallet.

The plant where I worked had yellow spray paint outlines on the floor in
several areas, when I asked what the lines meant, I was told to wait for a
good rain then I would know. The lines indicated where not to walk after
a leak in the roof had wet down the blocks real well and caused the
floor to "blister up". As long as you didn't knock any of the blocks out
of the blister and make it fall in on its self, the blister would subside when
the wood dried out again.

The largest, and one of the first, blisters or domes I saw in one of these
floors
was in the main floor of a facility that was being shut down. The dome was
20 to 30 feet in diameter and 3 to 4 feet high in the middle.

ARM




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