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The Natural Philosopher
 
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Default Cutting sandstone patio slabs.

I had tried both angle grinder with carborundum disks (wore em out in
seconds) and chipping with a cold chisel (worked, but not on long thin
bits: They always cracked across) and so decided to hire an angle
grinder with diamond blade.

What a difference!

I hired it for a day, but did the job in just over an hour, cuttng all
te awkward bits around edges and steps in that time.

Like a knife through butter.

Cost me 17.92 and saved a whole load of broken slabs. I even cut down
some other broken ones to make new smaller ones.

Only problem is the cut is too clean. Still a couple of minutes of
distressing with teh cold chisle solved that :-)

Just passing this on to anyine who is doing similar.

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John Rumm
 
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I had tried both angle grinder with carborundum disks (wore em out in
seconds) and chipping with a cold chisel (worked, but not on long thin
bits: They always cracked across) and so decided to hire an angle
grinder with diamond blade.

What a difference!


Once you have used one with a diamond disc, the normal abrasive ones do
seem kind of pointless !




--
Cheers,

John.

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John Woodhall
 
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"John Rumm" wrote in message
...
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I had tried both angle grinder with carborundum disks (wore em out in
seconds) and chipping with a cold chisel (worked, but not on long thin
bits: They always cracked across) and so decided to hire an angle grinder
with diamond blade.

What a difference!


Once you have used one with a diamond disc, the normal abrasive ones do
seem kind of pointless !



Agreed, its like driving a mini metro then getting in a ferrari. They do
however make great frisbee`s.


  #4   Report Post  
Pete C
 
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Default

On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 08:56:20 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

I had tried both angle grinder with carborundum disks (wore em out in
seconds) and chipping with a cold chisel (worked, but not on long thin
bits: They always cracked across) and so decided to hire an angle
grinder with diamond blade.

What a difference!

I hired it for a day, but did the job in just over an hour, cuttng all
te awkward bits around edges and steps in that time.

Like a knife through butter.

Cost me 17.92 and saved a whole load of broken slabs. I even cut down
some other broken ones to make new smaller ones.

Only problem is the cut is too clean. Still a couple of minutes of
distressing with teh cold chisle solved that :-)

Just passing this on to anyine who is doing similar.


Hi,

How thick is a diamond cutting disk? Anyone tried one of these on
wood?

cheers,
Pete.
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John Rumm
 
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Pete C wrote:

How thick is a diamond cutting disk? Anyone tried one of these on
wood?


3 - 4mm or so....

Only used one on wood indirectly (i.e. it was the bit of scrap under the
slab being cut!) - it will create smoke, heat, wear out the disc faster
and do a few other things... cutting the wood in any timely fashion not
being one of them ;-)



--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/


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Pete C
 
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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 14:46:41 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

How thick is a diamond cutting disk? Anyone tried one of these on
wood?


3 - 4mm or so....

Only used one on wood indirectly (i.e. it was the bit of scrap under the
slab being cut!) - it will create smoke, heat, wear out the disc faster
and do a few other things... cutting the wood in any timely fashion not
being one of them ;-)


OK, I've had reasonable results cutting wood with a thin metal cutting
disc where access is limited, so I'll stick to that...

(Eg cutting through the edge of plywood floor where it runs under a
partition wall, anyone know another way of doing it?)

cheers,
Pete.
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Ian Stirling
 
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Default

Pete C wrote:
On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 14:46:41 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

How thick is a diamond cutting disk? Anyone tried one of these on
wood?


3 - 4mm or so....

Only used one on wood indirectly (i.e. it was the bit of scrap under the
slab being cut!) - it will create smoke, heat, wear out the disc faster
and do a few other things... cutting the wood in any timely fashion not
being one of them ;-)


OK, I've had reasonable results cutting wood with a thin metal cutting
disc where access is limited, so I'll stick to that...

(Eg cutting through the edge of plywood floor where it runs under a
partition wall, anyone know another way of doing it?)


One of those electric knives on steroids?
  #8   Report Post  
John Rumm
 
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Pete C wrote:

OK, I've had reasonable results cutting wood with a thin metal cutting
disc where access is limited, so I'll stick to that...


You can get special wood cutting discs, they basically have a loop of
chainsaw chain round the perimeter. They are designed for rapid cutting
of wood and sculpting eyc. Axminster do them.

(Eg cutting through the edge of plywood floor where it runs under a
partition wall, anyone know another way of doing it?)


Reciprocating saw with a long blade, biscuit jointer perhaps.

--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #9   Report Post  
Andy Dingley
 
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Default

On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 23:40:26 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

You can get special wood cutting discs, they basically have a loop of
chainsaw chain round the perimeter.


They're for carving not cutting. If you try and cut with them, expect
kickbacks.

I'll not use the chainsaw sort - the solid Arbortech disks are much
safer.
--
Smert' spamionam
  #10   Report Post  
The Natural Philosopher
 
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Default

Pete C wrote:

On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 14:46:41 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:


How thick is a diamond cutting disk? Anyone tried one of these on
wood?


3 - 4mm or so....

Only used one on wood indirectly (i.e. it was the bit of scrap under the
slab being cut!) - it will create smoke, heat, wear out the disc faster
and do a few other things... cutting the wood in any timely fashion not
being one of them ;-)



OK, I've had reasonable results cutting wood with a thin metal cutting
disc where access is limited, so I'll stick to that...

(Eg cutting through the edge of plywood floor where it runs under a
partition wall, anyone know another way of doing it?)


Angle grinder will do it, but use a carborundum disc or (shudder) mount
up a rotary saw blade on the end of a drill.

Yes, its lethal so watch out.

However I used this to cut a plastic vertical soil pipe from inside
where it was below floor level, successfully.

cheers,
Pete.



  #11   Report Post  
Pete C
 
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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 23:40:26 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

OK, I've had reasonable results cutting wood with a thin metal cutting
disc where access is limited, so I'll stick to that...


You can get special wood cutting discs, they basically have a loop of
chainsaw chain round the perimeter. They are designed for rapid cutting
of wood and sculpting eyc. Axminster do them.

(Eg cutting through the edge of plywood floor where it runs under a
partition wall, anyone know another way of doing it?)


Reciprocating saw with a long blade, biscuit jointer perhaps.


Thanks, an Arbortech Tuff Cut looks just the thing to use, probably
good for trimming skirting and door frames too.

cheers,
Pete.
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