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Default Everest Windows

My wife bought a bungalow a few years. The previous owners had
installed Everest double glazed windows. We could not visit the property
because of Covid restrictions but there is a camera in the sitting room
and we did notice that the blinds were moving on windy days. I thought
that perhaps a window had been left open but when we were eventually
able to come here that was not the case. The all the Windows were made
by Everest.

The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about 8'
wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round it
and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame. Arround the outer aluminium frame there are
10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.

The curtains were moving because one of the top corners of the glass
aluminium frame had come away outwards leaving about a half inch gap. It
could not be pushed back because one of the screws was catching on the
aluminium frame mounted in the wood. I did just manage to get a
screwdriver into the screw and when I tried to turn it anticlockwise it
suddenly went further in and I was then able to push the glass and its
aluminium frame into the proper position though I can't secure it
properly. I can't see exactly what the screws do. If the window was much
smaller I could undo all the screws and then remove the glass and the
surrounding aluminium.

It is impossible to phone Everest but I did make contact via their
website chat. They told me that the windows were installed in 2008.
and said "as the door (?) was fitted before June 2020 this would have
been installed by Everest Ltd who went into administration in June 2020
we are Everest 2020 Ltd, a different company therefor cannot honor their
guarantees from that long ago"

I was sent a web form arranging a paid for repair. I completed this but
they have declined to do anything.

So I am very unimpressed by Everest. I don't understand why the window
would move outwards, the property is exposed to strong winds.

I am thinking about using pop rivets from the outside to hold the two
frames together. It looks like some sort of glue was also used in the
orogial installation.

Any suggestions as to what else to try?


--
Michael Chare
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Default Everest Windows

On 28/04/2021 19:01, Michael Chare wrote:
My wife bought a bungalow a few years.¬* The previous owners had
installed Everest double glazed windows. We could not visit the property
because of Covid restrictions but there is a camera in the sitting room
and we did notice that the blinds were moving on windy days.¬* I thought
that perhaps a window had been left open but when we were eventually
able to come here that was not the case. The all the Windows were made
by Everest.

The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about 8'
wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round it
and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame.¬* Arround the outer aluminium frame there are
10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.

The curtains were moving because one of the top corners of the glass
aluminium frame had come away outwards leaving about a half inch gap. It
could not be pushed back because one of the screws was catching on the
aluminium frame mounted in the wood.¬* I did just manage to get a
screwdriver into the screw and when I tried to turn it anticlockwise it
suddenly went further in and I was then able to push the glass and its
aluminium frame into the proper position though I can't secure it
properly. I can't see exactly what the screws do. If the window was much
smaller I could undo all the screws and then remove the glass and the
surrounding aluminium.

It is impossible to phone Everest but I did make contact via their
website chat.¬* They told me that the windows were installed in 2008.
and said "as the door¬* (?) was fitted before June 2020 this would have
been installed by Everest Ltd who went into administration in June 2020
we are Everest 2020 Ltd, a different company therefor cannot honor their
guarantees from that long ago"

I was sent a web form arranging a paid for repair. I completed this but
they have declined to do anything.

So I am very unimpressed by Everest.¬* I don't understand why the window
would move outwards, the property is exposed to strong winds.

I am thinking about using pop rivets from the outside to hold the two
frames together.¬* It looks like some sort of glue was also used in the
orogial installation.

Any suggestions as to what else to try?


I'm having difficulty in picturing what you've got and specifically how
the glass is held in place. And the access between the 2 frames.

The glass, if each pane is 6mm thick, is going to be 100kg. You might
find local glazing companies more responsive. With the weight involved
it's not something I would consider doing myself.

If a repair is uneconomical then I might use either low modulus mastic
or no-nails to keep the two together.


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Default Everest Windows

Michael Chare pretended :
It is impossible to phone Everest but I did make contact via their website
chat. They told me that the windows were installed in 2008.
and said "as the door (?) was fitted before June 2020 this would have been
installed by Everest Ltd who went into administration in June 2020 we are
Everest 2020 Ltd, a different company therefor cannot honor their guarantees
from that long ago"


Large DG companies frequently go bust and a quick name change, avoids
their liabilities. They are best avoided, best find a small local
company who will be cheaper, if you really cannot fix it yourself.
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Default Everest Windows

On 29/04/2021 01:21, Fredxx wrote:
On 28/04/2021 19:01, Michael Chare wrote:
My wife bought a bungalow a few years.¬* The previous owners had
installed Everest double glazed windows. We could not visit the
property because of Covid restrictions but there is a camera in the
sitting room and we did notice that the blinds were moving on windy
days.¬* I thought that perhaps a window had been left open but when we
were eventually able to come here that was not the case. The all the
Windows were made by Everest.

The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about
8' wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round
it and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame.¬* Arround the outer aluminium frame there
are 10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.

The curtains were moving because one of the top corners of the glass
aluminium frame had come away outwards leaving about a half inch gap.
It could not be pushed back because one of the screws was catching on
the aluminium frame mounted in the wood.¬* I did just manage to get a
screwdriver into the screw and when I tried to turn it anticlockwise
it suddenly went further in and I was then able to push the glass and
its aluminium frame into the proper position though I can't secure it
properly. I can't see exactly what the screws do. If the window was
much smaller I could undo all the screws and then remove the glass and
the surrounding aluminium.

It is impossible to phone Everest but I did make contact via their
website chat.¬* They told me that the windows were installed in 2008.
and said "as the door¬* (?) was fitted before June 2020 this would have
been installed by Everest Ltd who went into administration in June
2020 we are Everest 2020 Ltd, a different company therefor cannot
honor their guarantees from that long ago"

I was sent a web form arranging a paid for repair. I completed this
but they have declined to do anything.

So I am very unimpressed by Everest.¬* I don't understand why the
window would move outwards, the property is exposed to strong winds.

I am thinking about using pop rivets from the outside to hold the two
frames together.¬* It looks like some sort of glue was also used in the
orogial installation.

Any suggestions as to what else to try?


I'm having difficulty in picturing what you've got and specifically how
the glass is held in place. And the access between the 2 frames.

I think there are small tabs on both the aluminium frames where the
screw holes are. The screws which are possibly self tapping pull the
outer frame round the glass towards the fixed inner frame. The fitting
are to small for the size of the window which is why they have failed.


The glass, if each pane is 6mm thick, is going to be 100kg. You might
find local glazing companies more responsive. With the weight involved
it's not something I would consider doing myself.


Yes the size an weight is definately one of my concerns.


If a repair is uneconomical then I might use either low modulus mastic
or no-nails to keep the two together.


I did see some evidence of glue being used before. I need to use a glue
which takes a while to set such as araldite. The glass frame overlaps
the woodframe on the outside. I am considering using some pop rivets to
hold the two together. To do that I just need to drill a 5mm (4.8mm)
hole trhough them both.


--
Michael Chare
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Default Everest Windows

On 28/04/2021 19:01, Michael Chare wrote:
My wife bought a bungalow a few years.¬* The previous owners had
installed Everest double glazed windows. We could not visit the property
because of Covid restrictions but there is a camera in the sitting room
and we did notice that the blinds were moving on windy days.¬* I thought
that perhaps a window had been left open but when we were eventually
able to come here that was not the case. The all the Windows were made
by Everest.

The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about 8'
wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round it
and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame.¬* Arround the outer aluminium frame there are
10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.


It is very unusual to have a window that can be easily dismantled from
the outside. I'd be surprised if that interpretation is correct.

The curtains were moving because one of the top corners of the glass
aluminium frame had come away outwards leaving about a half inch gap. It
could not be pushed back because one of the screws was catching on the
aluminium frame mounted in the wood.¬* I did just manage to get a
screwdriver into the screw and when I tried to turn it anticlockwise it
suddenly went further in and I was then able to push the glass and its
aluminium frame into the proper position though I can't secure it
properly. I can't see exactly what the screws do. If the window was much
smaller I could undo all the screws and then remove the glass and the
surrounding aluminium.


We had a couple of Everest double glazed windows in our home when we
bought it. The outer wooden frame a dark mahogany imitation and then an
aluminium white powder coated sub frame with the DG units mounted inside
that. I don't recall any external holes or posidrive screws on them. The
only thing that failed with age was the draft proofing spacer fur on the
opening window joints - apart from that they were rock solid. Eventually
replaced after one was punctured by a stone chip off the lawnmower and
the seal on the other went bad allowing water vapour in. I think they
had lasted 30+ years from installation which isn't at all bad.

So I am very unimpressed by Everest.¬* I don't understand why the window
would move outwards, the property is exposed to strong winds.


I think you need to show us photos of a good corner and the bad one.
Your description of the problem is very difficult to follow.

I am thinking about using pop rivets from the outside to hold the two
frames together.¬* It looks like some sort of glue was also used in the
orogial installation.


Or possibly a later attempted repair.

Any suggestions as to what else to try?


If you can understand why it has moved and twisted the way it has then
you stand a much better chance of repairing it permanently. A double
glazed window unit that size will be quite a heavy thing to manhandle.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown


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Default Everest Windows

On 29/04/2021 11:49, Tim Streater wrote:

We took the view that we'd rather DG units were glazed from the inside (with
no sticky inside the frame) and could then be replaced more easily if needed.


A German firm that did a friends house (not visited them since it was
done) were able to do *everything* from inside - with no scaffolding.
This was for a two storey building all windows replaced.

I am not sure how and my friend was unable to explain the process.
I can't find a link to them online in either language.

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Martin Brown
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Default Everest Windows

On 29/04/2021 11:09, Michael Chare wrote:


I did see some evidence of glue being used before.¬* I need to use a glue
which takes a while to set such as araldite.¬* The glass frame overlaps
the woodframe on the outside. I am considering using some pop rivets to
hold the two together. To do that I just need to drill a 5mm (4.8mm)
hole trhough them both.




For metal to metal you can get self drilling screws but the two bits to
be joined need to be in good contact first.

https://www.screwfix.com/c/screws-na...rews/cat840058

--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
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Default Everest Windows

On 29 Apr 2021 10:49:46 GMT, Tim Streater
wrote:

On 29 Apr 2021 at 11:27:31 BST, Martin Brown
wrote:

On 28/04/2021 19:01, Michael Chare wrote:


The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about 8'
wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round it
and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame.* Arround the outer aluminium frame there are
10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.


It is very unusual to have a window that can be easily dismantled from
the outside. I'd be surprised if that interpretation is correct.


One DG outfit we looked at wanted to provide DG that was glazed from the
outside. That is, once the frame was in plate, the DG unit itself would be
offered up from the outside and then the glazing bars added from the outside.
I think their view was that as there was sticky in the opening, even if the
glazing bar were removed from the outside (easy), it would then be very hard
to get the DG unit out.

We took the view that we'd rather DG units were glazed from the inside (with
no sticky inside the frame) and could then be replaced more easily if needed.


A school I worked at had been double-glazed from the outside. No
sticky was involved - which seemed pretty insecure for a building with
hundreds of computers and other equipment inside but it turned out to
be a blessing for the relief caretaker who accidentally locked himself
out one night.

He got a couple of tools out of his car, used them to pop the trim off
one of the windows and pull out the glazing panel before he climbed
back inside and retrieved his keys.

Nick
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On 29/04/2021 11:27, Martin Brown wrote:
On 28/04/2021 19:01, Michael Chare wrote:
My wife bought a bungalow a few years.¬* The previous owners had
installed Everest double glazed windows. We could not visit the
property because of Covid restrictions but there is a camera in the
sitting room and we did notice that the blinds were moving on windy
days.¬* I thought that perhaps a window had been left open but when we
were eventually able to come here that was not the case. The all the
Windows were made by Everest.

The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about
8' wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round
it and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame.¬* Arround the outer aluminium frame there
are 10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.


It is very unusual to have a window that can be easily dismantled from
the outside. I'd be surprised if that interpretation is correct.

The curtains were moving because one of the top corners of the glass
aluminium frame had come away outwards leaving about a half inch gap.
It could not be pushed back because one of the screws was catching on
the aluminium frame mounted in the wood.¬* I did just manage to get a
screwdriver into the screw and when I tried to turn it anticlockwise
it suddenly went further in and I was then able to push the glass and
its aluminium frame into the proper position though I can't secure it
properly. I can't see exactly what the screws do. If the window was
much smaller I could undo all the screws and then remove the glass and
the surrounding aluminium.


We had a couple of Everest double glazed windows in our home when we
bought it. The outer wooden frame a dark mahogany imitation and then an
aluminium white powder coated sub frame with the DG units mounted inside
that. I don't recall any external holes or posidrive screws on them. The
only thing that failed with age was the draft proofing spacer fur on the
opening window joints - apart from that they were rock solid. Eventually
replaced after one was punctured by a stone chip off the lawnmower and
the seal on the other went bad allowing water vapour in. I think they
had lasted 30+ years from installation which isn't at all bad.


The holes are on the inside of the outer aluminium frame. The are
normally covered by little plastic inserts.



So I am very unimpressed by Everest.¬* I don't understand why the
window would move outwards, the property is exposed to strong winds.


I think you need to show us photos of a good corner and the bad one.
Your description of the problem is very difficult to follow.

I am thinking about using pop rivets from the outside to hold the two
frames together.¬* It looks like some sort of glue was also used in the
orogial installation.


Or possibly a later attempted repair.

Any suggestions as to what else to try?


If you can understand why it has moved and twisted the way it has then
you stand a much better chance of repairing it permanently. A double
glazed window unit that size will be quite a heavy thing to manhandle.


The property is exposed to strong winds. A storm force wind blowing
parallel to the glass might just suck the window out. It is not a
problem I have experienced before.

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On 29/04/2021 13:15, alan_m wrote:
On 29/04/2021 11:09, Michael Chare wrote:


I did see some evidence of glue being used before.¬* I need to use a
glue which takes a while to set such as araldite.¬* The glass frame
overlaps the woodframe on the outside. I am considering using some pop
rivets to hold the two together. To do that I just need to drill a 5mm
(4.8mm) hole trhough them both.




For metal to metal you can get self drilling screws but the two bits to
be joined need to be in good contact first.

https://www.screwfix.com/c/screws-na...rews/cat840058


Thanks for the suggestion.


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Default Everest Windows

I was given a very good tip by a bloke from one of those wall coating
companies about warranties. Make sure that its underwritten by a well known
financial entity, not just the company you had the service or product for if
its likely that you might need to have work done on it within its lifetime.
I've never had to claim against the wall coating company's warranty, but I
still could do, if I wanted as the insurance company is still there, unlike
the coating company who seem to go out of business and come back into
business with different names all the time, just like window companies do.
Brian

--

This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...

Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"Michael Chare" wrote in message
...
On 29/04/2021 11:27, Martin Brown wrote:
On 28/04/2021 19:01, Michael Chare wrote:
My wife bought a bungalow a few years. The previous owners had installed
Everest double glazed windows. We could not visit the property because
of Covid restrictions but there is a camera in the sitting room and we
did notice that the blinds were moving on windy days. I thought that
perhaps a window had been left open but when we were eventually able to
come here that was not the case. The all the Windows were made by
Everest.

The sitting room has a large window. The central glass panel is about 8'
wide by 6' high. The glass panel has an aluminium frame going round it
and was fitted from the outside into another aluminium frame that
attaches to a wooden frame. Arround the outer aluminium frame there are
10 holes about 8mm in diameter. These holes allow access to small
posidrive screws which I think pull the glass aluminium frame towards
the aluminium frame in the wooden frame.


It is very unusual to have a window that can be easily dismantled from
the outside. I'd be surprised if that interpretation is correct.

The curtains were moving because one of the top corners of the glass
aluminium frame had come away outwards leaving about a half inch gap. It
could not be pushed back because one of the screws was catching on the
aluminium frame mounted in the wood. I did just manage to get a
screwdriver into the screw and when I tried to turn it anticlockwise it
suddenly went further in and I was then able to push the glass and its
aluminium frame into the proper position though I can't secure it
properly. I can't see exactly what the screws do. If the window was much
smaller I could undo all the screws and then remove the glass and the
surrounding aluminium.


We had a couple of Everest double glazed windows in our home when we
bought it. The outer wooden frame a dark mahogany imitation and then an
aluminium white powder coated sub frame with the DG units mounted inside
that. I don't recall any external holes or posidrive screws on them. The
only thing that failed with age was the draft proofing spacer fur on the
opening window joints - apart from that they were rock solid. Eventually
replaced after one was punctured by a stone chip off the lawnmower and
the seal on the other went bad allowing water vapour in. I think they had
lasted 30+ years from installation which isn't at all bad.


The holes are on the inside of the outer aluminium frame. The are
normally covered by little plastic inserts.



So I am very unimpressed by Everest. I don't understand why the window
would move outwards, the property is exposed to strong winds.


I think you need to show us photos of a good corner and the bad one. Your
description of the problem is very difficult to follow.

I am thinking about using pop rivets from the outside to hold the two
frames together. It looks like some sort of glue was also used in the
orogial installation.


Or possibly a later attempted repair.

Any suggestions as to what else to try?


If you can understand why it has moved and twisted the way it has then
you stand a much better chance of repairing it permanently. A double
glazed window unit that size will be quite a heavy thing to manhandle.


The property is exposed to strong winds. A storm force wind blowing
parallel to the glass might just suck the window out. It is not a problem
I have experienced before.



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Indeed, but even insurance-backed warranties can be tricky to
enforce after a few years.

Andrew

On 30/04/2021 07:23, Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote:
I was given a very good tip by a bloke from one of those wall coating
companies about warranties. Make sure that its underwritten by a well known
financial entity, not just the company you had the service or product for if
its likely that you might need to have work done on it within its lifetime.
I've never had to claim against the wall coating company's warranty, but I
still could do, if I wanted as the insurance company is still there, unlike
the coating company who seem to go out of business and come back into
business with different names all the time, just like window companies do.
Brian


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