UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 14th 19, 09:35 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,174
Default Fence post mounting

The recent winds have seen the end of a boarded arris rail fence.
The posts are 100mm x 100mm, 3m apart and the fence about 1.6m high with
3 arris rails per section. It was probably 30 years old.
The posts rotted off at ground level about 15 years ago, and I hammered
post sockets into the ground and lifted the posts with the panels
attached into the sockets (which was one hell of a job - they were damn
heavy). I think it did well to last another 15 years, but now both the
posts and arris rails have rotted, and I think that's it.

I intend on mounting the replacement posts so they stop above the
ground. One possibility is to reuse the post sockets, but the one I've
uncovered so far under the undergrowth and collapsed fence is no longer
vertical, so they may have had it too.

Another thought is to use concrete repair spurs set in concrete, with
the posts bolted to these. There are some repaired posts in the garden
like this already - they've been there 20+ years and and rock solid.

Any thoughts on concreting these in? I can't believe one bag of
postcrete is enough for a 1.6m high fence on 3m spaced posts.
Is postcrete a compromise over using a real cement mix?
If so, what's a good volume per post, and what concrete mix?

Also, is there a different name for arris rails which instead of being
flush with the post faces are mounted on the surface so the boarding is
spaced slightly away from the post faces? Instead of triangle section,
they are almost rectangular but the top surface is cut with a slight
slope to prevent water pooling. (This is what I would like to use and
have seen elsewhere, but not what the fence used before.)

TIA
Andrew Gabriel

  #2   Report Post  
Old March 14th 19, 11:36 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2012
Posts: 371
Default Fence post mounting

On Thursday, 14 March 2019 21:35:14 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Any thoughts on concreting these in?


Andrew Gabriel, is that really you?

Over the countless years I've been on this group I don't think I recall ever seeing a question from you - you've always been the one helping others! :-)

(And, apologies, no advice from me to offer other than I've heard nothing but good things about Postcrete and that it generally is considered perfect for its job and not worth trying to improve upon, even when it is an issue of quantity)
  #3   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 07:19 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Sep 2012
Posts: 8,370
Default Fence post mounting

On Thursday, 14 March 2019 21:35:14 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
The recent winds have seen the end of a boarded arris rail fence.
The posts are 100mm x 100mm, 3m apart and the fence about 1.6m high with
3 arris rails per section. It was probably 30 years old.
The posts rotted off at ground level about 15 years ago, and I hammered
post sockets into the ground and lifted the posts with the panels
attached into the sockets (which was one hell of a job - they were damn
heavy). I think it did well to last another 15 years, but now both the
posts and arris rails have rotted, and I think that's it.

I intend on mounting the replacement posts so they stop above the
ground. One possibility is to reuse the post sockets, but the one I've
uncovered so far under the undergrowth and collapsed fence is no longer
vertical, so they may have had it too.

Another thought is to use concrete repair spurs set in concrete, with
the posts bolted to these. There are some repaired posts in the garden
like this already - they've been there 20+ years and and rock solid.

Any thoughts on concreting these in? I can't believe one bag of
postcrete is enough for a 1.6m high fence on 3m spaced posts.
Is postcrete a compromise over using a real cement mix?
If so, what's a good volume per post, and what concrete mix?

Also, is there a different name for arris rails which instead of being
flush with the post faces are mounted on the surface so the boarding is
spaced slightly away from the post faces? Instead of triangle section,
they are almost rectangular but the top surface is cut with a slight
slope to prevent water pooling. (This is what I would like to use and
have seen elsewhere, but not what the fence used before.)

TIA
Andrew Gabriel


The problem is even worse now, wood preservatives are such crap these days.
The fencing spikes are the best solution to rot I find. Plus give the ends of the posts a good soak in creocote/similar.
In exposed situations, braces at 90deg. to the fence run are the best solution if you can fit them in.
OR
https://www.tekplas.co.uk/shop/pvc-f... AEgJXh_D_BwE
  #4   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 08:15 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
jkn jkn is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 592
Default Fence post mounting

On Thursday, March 14, 2019 at 11:36:36 PM UTC, Mathew Newton wrote:
On Thursday, 14 March 2019 21:35:14 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Any thoughts on concreting these in?


Andrew Gabriel, is that really you?

Over the countless years I've been on this group I don't think I recall ever seeing a question from you - you've always been the one helping others! :-)

(And, apologies, no advice from me to offer other than I've heard nothing but good things about Postcrete and that it generally is considered perfect for its job and not worth trying to improve upon, even when it is an issue of quantity)


+1 - I *always* read what Andrew Gabriel has to say on uk.d-i-y, even when I
have no interest in the actual subject ;-)

Sorry Andrew, I too have nothing substantive to pass on to you. I hope you get
some better replies that ours. But at least some of us heartily appreciate
your presence here...

J^n
  #5   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 08:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,428
Default Fence post mounting

Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Another thought is to use concrete repair spurs set in concrete, with
the posts bolted to these. There are some repaired posts in the garden
like this already - they've been there 20+ years and and rock solid.

Any thoughts on concreting these in? I can't believe one bag of
postcrete is enough for a 1.6m high fence on 3m spaced posts.
Is postcrete a compromise over using a real cement mix?
If so, what's a good volume per post, and what concrete mix?


I built a pergola last year, and used

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Concrete-Bolt-Grip-Fence-Supports/dp/B00QIUEJB2

I decided that the metal to be embedded was a little short, so
dug the hole big enough to stand them on a couple of old bricks,
embedding the whole lot in 1.5 bags of postcrete.

Being a structure, I suppose I am more concerned with the whole
lot lifting/ pulling out, rather than blowing over.

I also have some timber posts for a trellis that I postcreted in
about 6 years ago, and are still in good condition.

There seems to be a product data sheet and calculation tool he

https://tarmac-bluecircle.co.uk/product/postcrete-trade/

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


Plant amazing Acers.


  #6   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 10:49 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,174
Default Fence post mounting

On 15/03/2019 08:15, jkn wrote:
On Thursday, March 14, 2019 at 11:36:36 PM UTC, Mathew Newton wrote:
On Thursday, 14 March 2019 21:35:14 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Any thoughts on concreting these in?


Andrew Gabriel, is that really you?

Over the countless years I've been on this group I don't think I recall ever seeing a question from you - you've always been the one helping others! :-)

(And, apologies, no advice from me to offer other than I've heard nothing but good things about Postcrete and that it generally is considered perfect for its job and not worth trying to improve upon, even when it is an issue of quantity)


+1 - I *always* read what Andrew Gabriel has to say on uk.d-i-y, even when I
have no interest in the actual subject ;-)

Sorry Andrew, I too have nothing substantive to pass on to you. I hope you get
some better replies that ours. But at least some of us heartily appreciate
your presence here...


Wow guys, thanks!

--
Andrew Gabriel
  #7   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 10:57 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2014
Posts: 3,396
Default Fence post mounting

On 15/03/2019 07:19, harry wrote:


The problem is even worse now, wood preservatives are such crap these days.
The fencing spikes are the best solution to rot I find. Plus give the ends of the posts a good soak in creocote/similar.
In exposed situations, braces at 90deg. to the fence run are the best solution if you can fit them in.
OR
https://www.tekplas.co.uk/shop/pvc-f... AEgJXh_D_BwE


I had reasonable success with delaying the rot in wooden posts by taking
the concrete used secure in the ground to above the soil level. IMO the
mistake most people make is to put in the postcrete/concrete and then
fill the rest of the hole with soil. The post always rots at a soil/air
boundary.


--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
  #8   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 11:21 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2016
Posts: 938
Default Fence post mounting

alan_m wrote:
On 15/03/2019 07:19, harry wrote:


The problem is even worse now, wood preservatives are such crap these days.
The fencing spikes are the best solution to rot I find. Plus give the

ends of the posts a good soak in creocote/similar.
In exposed situations, braces at 90deg. to the fence run are the best

solution if you can fit them in.
OR
https://www.tekplas.co.uk/shop/pvc-f... AEgJXh_D_BwE




I had reasonable success with delaying the rot in wooden posts by taking
the concrete used secure in the ground to above the soil level. IMO the
mistake most people make is to put in the postcrete/concrete and then
fill the rest of the hole with soil. The post always rots at a soil/air
boundary.

In general I don't use concrete at all if possible, it tends to keep
water/dampness around the post where it enters the ground. I have a
lot (probably one to two hundred) wooden posts around our smallholding
and the longest lasting ones are simply banged into the soil. The
quality of the posts is important, I have some original ones (which
were good ones!) which are now well over 20 years old and are still
sound whereas other not so good (and not so old) ones have failed.

It's quite difficult to be sure which suppliers' posts are best, ones
where the supplier talks about UC4 (or HC4) treatment are probably
good. Good 4"/100mm by 6' long posts now cost around £5 or more, back
20 years ago I could shop around and find them at about £1 each!

.... and modern preservatives are not so bad, apparently failures
reported to a wood research centre that studies this sort of thing are
no more now than before the CCA (copper/arsenic) treatment was banned.
Just make sure that the posts you get *are* UC4/HC4 treated, they will
often be date stamped and even have a 15 year guarantee.

--
Chris Green
·
  #9   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 11:47 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2008
Posts: 12,718
Default Fence post mounting

On Thu, 14 Mar 2019 21:35:11 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Another thought is to use concrete repair spurs set in concrete, with
the posts bolted to these. There are some repaired posts in the garden
like this already - they've been there 20+ years and and rock solid.

Any thoughts on concreting these in? I can't believe one bag of
postcrete is enough for a 1.6m high fence on 3m spaced posts.


It's how far into the ground the post goes that stops it falling over
rather than a mass around it. Postcrete is just a quick and simple
way of filling the space around the post. Rammed earth will do just
as well. Best if the post is snug in the hole, so a post borer or
post hole digger thingy rather than an 8" spade. Rule of thumb is 1/3
total post in the ground so 6' out of the ground, 2' in - 8' post.

--
Cheers
Dave.



  #10   Report Post  
Old March 15th 19, 11:58 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2016
Posts: 558
Default Fence post mounting

On 15/03/2019 11:47, Dave Liquorice wrote:
On Thu, 14 Mar 2019 21:35:11 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Another thought is to use concrete repair spurs set in concrete, with
the posts bolted to these. There are some repaired posts in the garden
like this already - they've been there 20+ years and and rock solid.

Any thoughts on concreting these in? I can't believe one bag of
postcrete is enough for a 1.6m high fence on 3m spaced posts.


It's how far into the ground the post goes that stops it falling over
rather than a mass around it. Postcrete is just a quick and simple
way of filling the space around the post. Rammed earth will do just
as well. Best if the post is snug in the hole, so a post borer or
post hole digger thingy rather than an 8" spade. Rule of thumb is 1/3
total post in the ground so 6' out of the ground, 2' in - 8' post.


Is it just me or...

--
Robin
reply-to address is (intended to be) valid


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Digging fence post holes - auger or "post hole digger"? unknown[_3_] UK diy 32 April 28th 18 12:58 AM
Post And Rail Fence Question Re "Plastic "Caps" For Post Tops Robert11[_4_] Home Repair 2 April 17th 18 12:21 AM
Easy-Post fence post spike Adam Funk[_3_] UK diy 11 May 17th 17 01:01 PM
Fence Post Repair. Fencemender, E-Z Mender, Post Buddy, or other? sms Home Repair 2 April 26th 15 06:04 PM
You take the fence post out, you put the fence post in David WE Roberts UK diy 23 September 11th 09 05:13 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:33 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017