UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
ss ss is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 859
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 419
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 19:37, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?

Plated will only attract a magnet if the base material is magnetic
-brass isnt !

English (solid) silver will be hallmarked - foreign silver may not have
any marks. You would have to use a silver testing kit on a scraping
which is deep enough to get through any plating.
  #3   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
ss ss is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 859
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 19:57, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 19:37:19 +0000, wrote:

I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?


If it's reasonably old, you may be able to see the base metal (often
copper or brass) showing through high spots where the silver has been
worn away by polishing.

1980 no high spots. they were made for a company promotion.
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,339
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver


"ss" wrote in message ...
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?


Plated items are often marked "EPNS".
Electro Plated Nickel Sliver.

You often find surface "blemishes" where the plating has (nearly) rubbed
through.
If no hallmarks, not likely to be solid silver.


  #5   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
ss ss is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 859
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 29/11/2013 09:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 20:47:13 +0000, Chris wrote:

On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 20:11:51 +0000, wrote:

On 28/11/2013 19:57, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 19:37:19 +0000, wrote:

I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?

If it's reasonably old, you may be able to see the base metal (often
copper or brass) showing through high spots where the silver has been
worn away by polishing.

1980 no high spots. they were made for a company promotion.


If it's that recent, then I would definitely expect a hallmark if
solid silver.

If you have a spring balance, the sort used by fishermen, tie a bit of
string to the item and tie the other end to the hook on the balance.
Weigh said item in air (grams), then lower it into a bucket of water
and note the new weight (I'm assuming there aren't any sealed
cavities, for example a hollow base that's been filled with plaster or
whatever). The difference in weight is numerically equal to the volume
of water displaced, i.e. the volume of the item in ml. Hence its
specific gravity is given by dividing weight in air by (weight in air
- weight in water). It won't be correct to many decimal places, but at
least will give you an idea as to the density of the item and hence
what it's (mostly) made of.

Silver 10.5
Copper 8.9
Nickel Silver 8.75
Brass 8.4 - 8.8

While the test as described may not be accurate enough to distinguish
between the last three, it might at least tell you if it's silver.


An alternative if you haven't got a spring balance, but do have a
digital balance, is to weigh the item in air (you've already done
that, I see: 164g). Then put a beaker of water on the scales and tare
the reading to zero. Lower the item into the water, suspended from a
cotton thread, until it's fully immersed but not touching the sides or
bottom. The reading on the scale will be numerically equal to the
volume of the item. The specific gravity is then simply 164/(scale
reading). But this method does depend on the scales having sufficient
capacity to weigh the beaker of water plus a bit more for the immersed
item.

Thanks Chris I will try that later today.


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,998
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

I'd have thought whether its magnetic or not really depends on what they put
the plating onto. I've seen brass things silver plated.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
"ss" wrote in message ...
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?



  #7   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
ss ss is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 859
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 29/11/2013 10:57, ss wrote:
On 29/11/2013 09:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 20:47:13 +0000, Chris wrote:

On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 20:11:51 +0000, wrote:

On 28/11/2013 19:57, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 19:37:19 +0000, wrote:

I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is
solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in
some way.

Any thoughts?

If it's reasonably old, you may be able to see the base metal (often
copper or brass) showing through high spots where the silver has been
worn away by polishing.

1980 no high spots. they were made for a company promotion.

If it's that recent, then I would definitely expect a hallmark if
solid silver.

If you have a spring balance, the sort used by fishermen, tie a bit of
string to the item and tie the other end to the hook on the balance.
Weigh said item in air (grams), then lower it into a bucket of water
and note the new weight (I'm assuming there aren't any sealed
cavities, for example a hollow base that's been filled with plaster or
whatever). The difference in weight is numerically equal to the volume
of water displaced, i.e. the volume of the item in ml. Hence its
specific gravity is given by dividing weight in air by (weight in air
- weight in water). It won't be correct to many decimal places, but at
least will give you an idea as to the density of the item and hence
what it's (mostly) made of.

Silver 10.5
Copper 8.9
Nickel Silver 8.75
Brass 8.4 - 8.8

While the test as described may not be accurate enough to distinguish
between the last three, it might at least tell you if it's silver.


An alternative if you haven't got a spring balance, but do have a
digital balance, is to weigh the item in air (you've already done
that, I see: 164g). Then put a beaker of water on the scales and tare
the reading to zero. Lower the item into the water, suspended from a
cotton thread, until it's fully immersed but not touching the sides or
bottom. The reading on the scale will be numerically equal to the
volume of the item. The specific gravity is then simply 164/(scale
reading). But this method does depend on the scales having sufficient
capacity to weigh the beaker of water plus a bit more for the immersed
item.

Thanks Chris I will try that later today.


Chris... came out with a reading of 8.63 so I guess I can safely assume
silver plated.
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
ss ss is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 859
Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 29/11/2013 10:57, ss wrote:
On 29/11/2013 09:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 20:47:13 +0000, Chris wrote:

On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 20:11:51 +0000, wrote:

On 28/11/2013 19:57, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Thu, 28 Nov 2013 19:37:19 +0000, wrote:

I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is
solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in
some way.

Any thoughts?

If it's reasonably old, you may be able to see the base metal (often
copper or brass) showing through high spots where the silver has been
worn away by polishing.

1980 no high spots. they were made for a company promotion.

If it's that recent, then I would definitely expect a hallmark if
solid silver.

If you have a spring balance, the sort used by fishermen, tie a bit of
string to the item and tie the other end to the hook on the balance.
Weigh said item in air (grams), then lower it into a bucket of water
and note the new weight (I'm assuming there aren't any sealed
cavities, for example a hollow base that's been filled with plaster or
whatever). The difference in weight is numerically equal to the volume
of water displaced, i.e. the volume of the item in ml. Hence its
specific gravity is given by dividing weight in air by (weight in air
- weight in water). It won't be correct to many decimal places, but at
least will give you an idea as to the density of the item and hence
what it's (mostly) made of.

Silver 10.5
Copper 8.9
Nickel Silver 8.75
Brass 8.4 - 8.8

While the test as described may not be accurate enough to distinguish
between the last three, it might at least tell you if it's silver.


An alternative if you haven't got a spring balance, but do have a
digital balance, is to weigh the item in air (you've already done
that, I see: 164g). Then put a beaker of water on the scales and tare
the reading to zero. Lower the item into the water, suspended from a
cotton thread, until it's fully immersed but not touching the sides or
bottom. The reading on the scale will be numerically equal to the
volume of the item. The specific gravity is then simply 164/(scale
reading). But this method does depend on the scales having sufficient
capacity to weigh the beaker of water plus a bit more for the immersed
item.

Thanks Chris I will try that later today.


Chris... came out with a reading of 8.63 so I guess I can safely assume
silver plated.
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver ss UK diy 16 November 29th 13 05:51 PM
Painting old silver plate starrin Home Repair 5 February 28th 09 11:31 PM
silver, gold, silver, black, brown Who can read its value? hotjomo Electronics Repair 10 December 10th 06 01:58 AM
Spray Painting Silver Plate? weft2 Metalworking 2 April 11th 06 04:05 AM
silver solder for silver "plating"? jtaylor Metalworking 5 June 7th 05 08:19 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:44 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"