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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?


You *could* try working out the specific gravity of the item, if you've
got scales and a liquid measure accurate enough. The problem is that
differing grades of silver have different densities,depending on what's
in the alloy.

Some foreign silver isn't hallmarked, just to add to the confusion. An
expert might take a quick look at it and say where it's from, and what
it's likely to be made of.

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.


Archimedes solved that problem quite a long time ago.

From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.


Hallmarks have been required in England (later Britain), France and
Switzerland for centuries. However, it is not a universal requirement
and I have a gold watch that only carries the designation 14K, with no
other marks.

Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt...


Only if the base metal is magnetic. Sheffield plate, for example, is a
laminate of copper between silver outer layers.

Colin Bignell
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 19:53, John Williamson wrote:
On 28/11/2013 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.

Any thoughts?


You *could* try working out the specific gravity of the item, if you've
got scales and a liquid measure accurate enough. The problem is that
differing grades of silver have different densities,depending on what's
in the alloy.

Some foreign silver isn't hallmarked, just to add to the confusion. An
expert might take a quick look at it and say where it's from, and what
it's likely to be made of.

Not sure where it was manufactured but was for a british company which
doesnt really help.
I have scales that measure grams but just a normal plastic measuring
jug, however I could probably measure the overflow if I immerse in a jug
thats level with water. I have some syringes that I used for filling ink
into printer carts that are possibly accurate enough.
The item weighs 164 grams.
Should I be able to work something out from the volume displacement?
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 20:00, Nightjar wrote:
On 28/11/2013 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.


Archimedes solved that problem quite a long time ago.

From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.


Hallmarks have been required in England (later Britain), France and
Switzerland for centuries. However, it is not a universal requirement
and I have a gold watch that only carries the designation 14K, with no
other marks.

Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt...


Only if the base metal is magnetic. Sheffield plate, for example, is a
laminate of copper between silver outer layers.

EPNS doesn't, either.


--
Tciao for Now!

John.


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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 20:14, John Williamson wrote:
On 28/11/2013 20:00, Nightjar wrote:

....
Only if the base metal is magnetic. Sheffield plate, for example, is a
laminate of copper between silver outer layers.

EPNS doesn't, either.


That reminds me of when my partner first came to Britain. She was
bringing with her a set of solid silver cutlery, which would then have
attracted import duty. The Customs officer, not finding any hallmarks,
asked her if it was German silver, meaning nickel silver. As it was
silver and she was German, bringing it from Germany she truthfully
answered yes. He didn't charge her any duty.

Colin Bignell
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 20:04, ss wrote:
On 28/11/2013 19:53, John Williamson wrote:
On 28/11/2013 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some
way.

Any thoughts?


You *could* try working out the specific gravity of the item, if you've
got scales and a liquid measure accurate enough. The problem is that
differing grades of silver have different densities,depending on what's
in the alloy.

Some foreign silver isn't hallmarked, just to add to the confusion. An
expert might take a quick look at it and say where it's from, and what
it's likely to be made of.

Not sure where it was manufactured but was for a british company which
doesnt really help.
I have scales that measure grams but just a normal plastic measuring
jug, however I could probably measure the overflow if I immerse in a jug
thats level with water. I have some syringes that I used for filling ink
into printer carts that are possibly accurate enough.
The item weighs 164 grams.
Should I be able to work something out from the volume displacement?


You might need measuring equipment better than what you've just told us
is available. Nickel silver (8400-8900 kg/m3), which is the densest
common foundation for silver plating is about 15% less dense than Silver
(10490), which is one of heaviest common metals.

For the best volumetric accuracy, mark the fluid level on the container
side without the item, add it, shake to remove any air bubbles, and
subtract fluid using the syringes until the mark is reached again.
Always measure to the bottom of the meniscus. Measuring the overflow
from a full container is not an accurate way to do it.

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 20:30, John Williamson wrote:
On 28/11/2013 20:04, ss wrote:
On 28/11/2013 19:53, John Williamson wrote:
On 28/11/2013 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is
solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.
It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some
way.

Any thoughts?

You *could* try working out the specific gravity of the item, if you've
got scales and a liquid measure accurate enough. The problem is that
differing grades of silver have different densities,depending on what's
in the alloy.

Some foreign silver isn't hallmarked, just to add to the confusion. An
expert might take a quick look at it and say where it's from, and what
it's likely to be made of.

Not sure where it was manufactured but was for a british company which
doesnt really help.
I have scales that measure grams but just a normal plastic measuring
jug, however I could probably measure the overflow if I immerse in a jug
thats level with water. I have some syringes that I used for filling ink
into printer carts that are possibly accurate enough.
The item weighs 164 grams.
Should I be able to work something out from the volume displacement?


You might need measuring equipment better than what you've just told us
is available. Nickel silver (8400-8900 kg/m3), which is the densest
common foundation for silver plating is about 15% less dense than Silver
(10490), which is one of heaviest common metals.

For the best volumetric accuracy, mark the fluid level on the container
side without the item, add it, shake to remove any air bubbles, and
subtract fluid using the syringes until the mark is reached again.
Always measure to the bottom of the meniscus. Measuring the overflow
from a full container is not an accurate way to do it.


If you have a decent balance then weighing it hung in free space and
then immersed in a jar of water is a nicer way to measure the specific
gravity without having to measure volumes of water.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/13 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.


not necessarily., plated is usually brass.

in general there is a different sound to solid silver, it doesn't 'ring'
like brass does.

And the hallmark should say EPNS if its plated somewhere.


It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.


Are there any markings? IIRC form some ancient antiques roadshow silver
- solid silver - cannot be legally made without a hallmark.

Any thoughts?



--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc-ra-cy) a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.

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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 21:37, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 28/11/13 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.


not necessarily., plated is usually brass.

in general there is a different sound to solid silver, it doesn't 'ring'
like brass does.

And the hallmark should say EPNS if its plated somewhere.


It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.


Are there any markings? IIRC form some ancient antiques roadshow silver
- solid silver - cannot be legally made without a hallmark.

Any thoughts?



There are no markings at all but I do recognise the silver tarnishing
and I have just polished it up (again) It was given to me by my company
in 1980 as silver but cant remember if plated or solid.
There was a gold version that was solid (I think I remember that out of
jealousy) but we didnt qualify for them :-(


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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 28/11/2013 21:37, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 28/11/13 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.


not necessarily., plated is usually brass.

in general there is a different sound to solid silver, it doesn't 'ring'
like brass does.

And the hallmark should say EPNS if its plated somewhere.


It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.


Are there any markings? IIRC form some ancient antiques roadshow silver
- solid silver - cannot be legally made without a hallmark.

Any thoughts?



There are no markings at all but I do recognise the silver tarnishing
and I have just polished it up (again) It was given to me by my company
in 1980 as silver but cant remember if plated or solid.
There was a gold version that was solid (I think I remember that out of
jealousy) but we didnt qualify for them :-(

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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On Thursday, November 28, 2013 7:39:07 PM UTC, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid

(doubtful) or just plated.

From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.

Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.

It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.



Any thoughts?


Take it to a decent buyer of gold and silver, where they will X-ray it to see if it's plated or not. If it's plated they'll hand it back, if it's solid, then they'll offer you a scrap price, which you can accept or decline.

There's a good one in Telford way, on a trading estate (not a jewellers/pawn brokers type place) which is very efficient and offers the best scrap prices.
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

ss wrote:
On 28/11/2013 21:37, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 28/11/13 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.


not necessarily., plated is usually brass.

in general there is a different sound to solid silver, it doesn't 'ring'
like brass does.

And the hallmark should say EPNS if its plated somewhere.


It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.


Are there any markings? IIRC form some ancient antiques roadshow silver
- solid silver - cannot be legally made without a hallmark.

Any thoughts?



There are no markings at all but I do recognise the silver tarnishing and
I have just polished it up (again) It was given to me by my company in
1980 as silver but cant remember if plated or solid.
There was a gold version that was solid (I think I remember that out of
jealousy) but we didnt qualify for them :-(


Given that it's un-hallmarked and made as a one-off, it's probably only of
sentimental value to you. I doubt that you can put any value on it other
than it's simple weight in silver (if that's what it is). Just out of
interest, why do you want to evaluate it?

Tim
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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 29/11/2013 08:09, Tim+ wrote:
wrote:
On 28/11/2013 21:37, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 28/11/13 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.

not necessarily., plated is usually brass.

in general there is a different sound to solid silver, it doesn't 'ring'
like brass does.

And the hallmark should say EPNS if its plated somewhere.


It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in some way.


Are there any markings? IIRC form some ancient antiques roadshow silver
- solid silver - cannot be legally made without a hallmark.

Any thoughts?


There are no markings at all but I do recognise the silver tarnishing and
I have just polished it up (again) It was given to me by my company in
1980 as silver but cant remember if plated or solid.
There was a gold version that was solid (I think I remember that out of
jealousy) but we didnt qualify for them :-(


Given that it's un-hallmarked and made as a one-off, it's probably only of
sentimental value to you. I doubt that you can put any value on it other
than it's simple weight in silver (if that's what it is). Just out of
interest, why do you want to evaluate it?

Tim


Its something I was given when I worked for the company and was going to
bin it then thought a collector may buy it, its a silver pot noodle and
will try and get £100 as only 200 ever produced in 1980, I know they had
a solid gold version but only about 10 of those. No harm in trying.

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h1...ps3f2a00c6.jpg

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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On Friday, November 29, 2013 2:43:32 PM UTC, ss wrote:


Its something I was given when I worked for the company and was going to

bin it then thought a collector may buy it, its a silver pot noodle and

will try and get 100 as only 200 ever produced in 1980, I know they had

a solid gold version but only about 10 of those. No harm in trying.



http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h1...ps3f2a00c6.jpg


Someone trying to flog one on ebay atm, up for 95 but no bids.

Although noticed the spinning forks seem to sell well and I have a couple of those in the boxes (somewhere).



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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

On 29/11/13 14:43, ss wrote:
On 29/11/2013 08:09, Tim+ wrote:
wrote:
On 28/11/2013 21:37, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 28/11/13 19:39, ss wrote:
I have an item that is silver but would like to determine if it is
solid
(doubtful) or just plated.
From what I can gather solid has a hallmark which this hasnt.
Plated will attract a magnet which this doesnt.

not necessarily., plated is usually brass.

in general there is a different sound to solid silver, it doesn't
'ring'
like brass does.

And the hallmark should say EPNS if its plated somewhere.


It was not made for public sale so maybe got under the radar in
some way.


Are there any markings? IIRC form some ancient antiques roadshow silver
- solid silver - cannot be legally made without a hallmark.

Any thoughts?


There are no markings at all but I do recognise the silver tarnishing
and
I have just polished it up (again) It was given to me by my company in
1980 as silver but cant remember if plated or solid.
There was a gold version that was solid (I think I remember that out of
jealousy) but we didnt qualify for them :-(


Given that it's un-hallmarked and made as a one-off, it's probably
only of
sentimental value to you. I doubt that you can put any value on it other
than it's simple weight in silver (if that's what it is). Just out of
interest, why do you want to evaluate it?

Tim


Its something I was given when I worked for the company and was going to
bin it then thought a collector may buy it, its a silver pot noodle and
will try and get £100 as only 200 ever produced in 1980, I know they had
a solid gold version but only about 10 of those. No harm in trying.

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h1...ps3f2a00c6.jpg


Vile beyond belief. Just advertise it as a 'gay silver pot noodle
holder' and you will get a grand for it.

The more scathing I have been on product descriptions the more I have
got for utter crap. "Suitable present for unwanted relative" did really
well as did "appalling genre fantasy made worse by unnecessary gay
relationship between the protagonists"

The only thing that sells higher, is Nazi stuff.



Also check the engraving. You normally engrave first and plate
afterwards and that is distinctly different from engraved solid. that
has sharp burred edges.



--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc-ra-cy) a system of government where the least capable to
lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
diminishing number of producers.

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Default How to evaluate silver plate v solid silver

In message , ss
writes

Its something I was given when I worked for the company and was going
to bin it then thought a collector may buy it, its a silver pot noodle
and will try and get 100 as only 200 ever produced in 1980, I know
they had a solid gold version but only about 10 of those. No harm in
trying.

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h1...ps3f2a00c6.jpg


A splendiferous enormity!

I can raise you a mounted, chrome plated, two row, self aligning bearing
fitted with an accurate clock:-)

SKF 75 years anniversary. Crumbs, I must have had that for 30 years! I
wonder what they did for the 100th.


--
Tim Lamb
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