UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Niel A. Farrow
 
Posts: n/a
Default where to buy washed sharp sand?

I'm repointing my old house with 1:1:6 cement:lime:washed sharp sand. I
can't find the washed sharp sand at the local builders merchants. Do any
of the sheds sell it?

If I use unwashed sand will I have problems?

Can I wash my own sand? If so, what type of soap should I use - only kidding.

Thank you,

Neil
  #3   Report Post  
BigWallop
 
Posts: n/a
Default where to buy washed sharp sand?


"Niel A. Farrow" wrote in message
...
I'm repointing my old house with 1:1:6 cement:lime:washed sharp sand. I
can't find the washed sharp sand at the local builders merchants. Do any
of the sheds sell it?

If I use unwashed sand will I have problems?

Can I wash my own sand? If so, what type of soap should I use - only

kidding.

Thank you,

Neil


Build yourself an open wooden frame and put it on an old bed sheet across
it. Put the sharp sand on the top then run a hose over it for a minute or
two. Guaranteed to wash any sand you've bought. Even the cheapest of sharp
sand.


  #4   Report Post  
Owain
 
Posts: n/a
Default where to buy washed sharp sand?

"PoP" wrote
| Niel A. Farrow) wrote:
| Can I wash my own sand? If so, what type of soap should I use - only
kidding.
| Yes, but you have to do it one grain at a time. Only kidding

A Miele'll wash anything. Only kidding

Owain



  #6   Report Post  
Michael McNeil
 
Posts: n/a
Default where to buy washed sharp sand?

(Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message ...
In article ,
(Niel A. Farrow) writes:
I'm repointing my old house with 1:1:6 cement:lime:washed sharp sand. I
can't find the washed sharp sand at the local builders merchants. Do any
of the sheds sell it?


I would not have thought it was necessary to wash sharp sand,
only building sand. However, I would suggest you use a mixture
of (washed) building sand and sharp sand -- probably more building
sand than sharp sand as you'll find repointing with just sharp
sand is probably very difficult. The mixture will better match
the original, as sand wasn't graded back then and was a mix of
just about all sizes. To get the colour as light as possible,
also use white cement rather than more common gray. You can buy
that at builder's merchant, but I don't recall seeing it in DIY
sheds.

If I use unwashed sand will I have problems?


I think the only difference it makes to (building) sand is to
wash away the very fine particles, which otherwise act as a very
powerful yellow pigment. However, this is just by observation;
I've never actually seen a description of what washing sand is
meant to do.


There are two types of sand: bricklaying sand which is very fine and
plastering sand which is larger. (There is also a concrete grade but
it isn't really sand.) Get the coarser of the sand from your
builder's. It will be local and cheaper than the bagged stuff from a
warehouse.

Sharp sand is a reference to its edges which if not freshly quarried
may have smooth edges due to abrasion. It happens in sea sand and it
happens in desert dunes.

The only problem is the colour. Unless you know the original supply
you will just have to hope for the best.
  #7   Report Post  
David W.E. Roberts
 
Posts: n/a
Default where to buy washed sharp sand?


"Michael McNeil" wrote in message
m...
snip
There are two types of sand: bricklaying sand which is very fine and
plastering sand which is larger. (There is also a concrete grade but
it isn't really sand.) Get the coarser of the sand from your
builder's. It will be local and cheaper than the bagged stuff from a
warehouse.

snip

Be warned - there are at least three grades.
We had a problem when we ordered plastering sand - the sand delivered
included very small stones (around 1-2mm) and was totally unsuitable for
rendering.
Turned out this was a grade generally used for floor screeds.
The BM had sent the wrong kind, but it was only when we mentioned the small
stones they finally twigged what they had done.
This may be the standard 'sharp sand' which is also mixed with aggregate to
make concrete (the 'concrete grade' referred to above?).
I suspect there are regional variations as well, depending on the quarries
and local terminology.

HTH
Dave R


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How sharp are woodworms teeth? SadKate*** UK diy 6 August 7th 03 07:16 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:44 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"