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David Pearson
 
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Default Bit stuck in leccy screwdriver

G'day.

I have a nice new electric screwdriver. Fast and with lots
of torque. Only used it for one DIY job - putting up plasterboard
and Kingspan on a new ceiling.

I had to push as hard as I could to get the screws in without
the bit rotating in the screw-heads, and even then it sometimes
did. So I wore out one plasterboard bit and started a second.
About 10:30 last night, the second bit got a bit smoothed-off,
but it was solidly stuck in the bit-holder and I could not pull
it out even with pliers.

I think this is a refund job, but I cannot honestly say
whether the fault is with the drill, or whether I have
been using crappy bits (came free with the boxes of
drywall screws). I mean, did the drill deform, or did the
bit deform, or both, or something else?

I would be grateful for any advice on this, so I can
get a refund succesfully without lying about it.

Thanks!

P.S. this was after about 50 75mm drywall screws and
maybe 100 95mm drywall screws.


  #2   Report Post  
Chris Bacon
 
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Default

David Pearson wrote:
G'day.

I have a nice new electric screwdriver. Fast and with lots
of torque. Only used it for one DIY job - putting up plasterboard
and Kingspan on a new ceiling.

I had to push as hard as I could to get the screws in without
the bit rotating in the screw-heads, and even then it sometimes
did. So I wore out one plasterboard bit and started a second.
About 10:30 last night, the second bit got a bit smoothed-off,
but it was solidly stuck in the bit-holder and I could not pull
it out even with pliers.


Whack it from side to side with the edge of a real screwdriver, or
something. Maybe a bit of swarf from the bit or screws is jamming.
  #3   Report Post  
Lurch
 
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Default

On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 19:15:47 +0000 (UTC), "David Pearson"
scrawled:

I think this is a refund job, but I cannot honestly say
whether the fault is with the drill, or whether I have
been using crappy bits (came free with the boxes of
drywall screws). I mean, did the drill deform, or did the
bit deform, or both, or something else?

Could well be both, I usually just sling all those free bits you get
with bulk screws and with drills as they're absolutely useless, as
you've found out.

Without knowing what the drill was I have no idea whether that could
be at fault or not, but it's quite possible.
--
Stuart @ SJW Electrical

Please Reply to group
  #4   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default

David Pearson wrote:
G'day.

I have a nice new electric screwdriver. Fast and with lots
of torque. Only used it for one DIY job - putting up plasterboard
and Kingspan on a new ceiling.

I had to push as hard as I could to get the screws in without
the bit rotating in the screw-heads, and even then it sometimes
did. So I wore out one plasterboard bit and started a second.
About 10:30 last night, the second bit got a bit smoothed-off,
but it was solidly stuck in the bit-holder and I could not pull
it out even with pliers.

I think this is a refund job, but I cannot honestly say
whether the fault is with the drill, or whether I have
been using crappy bits (came free with the boxes of
drywall screws). I mean, did the drill deform, or did the
bit deform, or both, or something else?

I would be grateful for any advice on this, so I can
get a refund succesfully without lying about it.

Thanks!

P.S. this was after about 50 75mm drywall screws and
maybe 100 95mm drywall screws.



You shouldnt need to lean on it to prvent the bit slipping. If you do,
either the bits the wrong type (common) or its a seriously junk bit.

I spose I should say this, though you probably knew this long ago. Just
in case. Some chucks are designed to hold the bit in firm, you slide
the collar back to release it.


NT

  #5   Report Post  
David Pearson
 
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"Lurch" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 19:15:47 +0000 (UTC), "David Pearson"
scrawled:

I think this is a refund job, but I cannot honestly say
whether the fault is with the drill, or whether I have
been using crappy bits (came free with the boxes of
drywall screws). I mean, did the drill deform, or did the
bit deform, or both, or something else?

Could well be both, I usually just sling all those free bits you get
with bulk screws and with drills as they're absolutely useless, as
you've found out.


I naively assumed that the freebies would the right size
and the right quality. Never having bought drywall screws
before, I was quite excited on finding these bits in the
boxes. But now I know.


-David P (the OP)




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David Pearson
 
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Default


wrote in message
oups.com...
You shouldnt need to lean on it to prvent the bit slipping. If you do,
either the bits the wrong type (common) or its a seriously junk bit.


OK, thanks for that. I have been mis-screwing for years then.
Will next try some bits that fit!


I spose I should say this, though you probably knew this long ago. Just
in case. Some chucks are designed to hold the bit in firm, you slide
the collar back to release it.


Like a Yankee push-ratchet screwdriver? I considered using one
of those instead of an electric screwdriver, thinking that at least
the batteries would not run out (unless I got tired). But I
don't think there is the range of bits available for Yankees that there
is for leccy drivers - or am I wrong? If so, is a Yankee a
sensible option for a big screwing job like a ceiling?


Cheers,
DP (OP)


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John Cartmell
 
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Default

In article ,
David Pearson wrote:
You shouldnt need to lean on it to prvent the bit slipping. If you do,
either the bits the wrong type (common) or its a seriously junk bit.


OK, thanks for that. I have been mis-screwing for years then.


More likely the design is rubbish. I don't understand why the square bit screw
is not the standard style; positive action, no slip, no chance of mistaking
the correct bit, less chance of getting a junk bit.

--
John Cartmell john@ followed by finnybank.com 0845 006 8822
Qercus magazine FAX +44 (0)8700-519-527 www.finnybank.com
Qercus - the best guide to RISC OS computing

  #8   Report Post  
Andy Champ
 
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Default

David Pearson wrote:
Like a Yankee push-ratchet screwdriver? I considered using one
of those instead of an electric screwdriver, thinking that at least
the batteries would not run out (unless I got tired). But I
don't think there is the range of bits available for Yankees that there
is for leccy drivers - or am I wrong? If so, is a Yankee a
sensible option for a big screwing job like a ceiling?


I've just put 200 screws in some decking with one, after my cordless
drill died. You can still get bits, I now have brand new no1, 2, and 3
posidriv bits for it to add the the flat ones I've had for years. A bit
hard to find though.

Andy
  #9   Report Post  
Chris Hodges
 
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Default

David Pearson wrote:
snip
But I
don't think there is the range of bits available for Yankees that there
is for leccy drivers - or am I wrong? If so, is a Yankee a
sensible option for a big screwing job like a ceiling?


There are plans/instructions around for making a yankee-1/4" hex
adaptor, made from a 1/4" Allen key and a 1/4" Hex magnetic bit holder.
I've made 2, and they both worked fine. A google groups search may be
best - it may even have been posted to this group.

Mine yankee driver was stolen recently, and I don't much feel like
paying 40 for a new one - maybe I'll keep an eye out on ebay.

Chris

--
Spamtrap in use
To email replace 127.0.0.1 with blueyonder dot co dot uk
  #10   Report Post  
 
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I wrote
There are plans/instructions around for making a yankee-1/4" hex
adaptor, made from a 1/4" Allen key and a 1/4" Hex magnetic bit holder.
I've made 2, and they both worked fine. A google groups search may be
best - it may even have been posted to this group.


Now that I'm buying a replacement on ebay I've found the instructions
for making the adaptor:
http://homepage.mac.com/galoot_9/yankee_bit.html

Chris (via google as I don't retain messages once I've read them)



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xscope
 
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Default

Is it a drill/ driver with a keyless chuck?

If so, some have a sliding ring that needs to be pulled back before you
can undo.

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