Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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steamer
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

--I've about given up on trying to get some parts AWJ cut out of
2" aluminum plate. Plan B is to make a pattern, make a mold and make some
lost wax versions of it. Can someone suggest where I might find a foundry
that does lost wax casting in or around the San Francisco Bay Area?
--TIA,

--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Money talks; it
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : says "Goodbye"...
http://www.nmpproducts.com/intro.htm
---Decks a-wash in a sea of words---
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Winston
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

steamer wrote:
--I've about given up on trying to get some parts AWJ cut out of
2" aluminum plate. Plan B is to make a pattern, make a mold and make some
lost wax versions of it. Can someone suggest where I might find a foundry
that does lost wax casting in or around the San Francisco Bay Area?
--TIA,


How about these folks?

I have no experience with them but they look interesting.

--Winston

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Winston
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

Winston wrote:
steamer wrote:

--I've about given up on trying to get some parts AWJ cut out of
2" aluminum plate. Plan B is to make a pattern, make a mold and make
some lost wax versions of it. Can someone suggest where I might find a
foundry that does lost wax casting in or around the San Francisco Bay
Area?
--TIA,


How about these folks?

I have no experience with them but they look interesting.

--Winston


Oops:

http://www.thecrucible.org/

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skuke
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 17:20:32 GMT, steamer wrote:

--I've about given up on trying to get some parts AWJ cut out of
2" aluminum plate. Plan B is to make a pattern, make a mold and make some
lost wax versions of it. Can someone suggest where I might find a foundry
that does lost wax casting in or around the San Francisco Bay Area?
--TIA,




J.C. Productions in Santa Clara, 408-727-8636 is a pattern maker and could
point you in the right direction if they couldn't do it themselves.

--
Skuke
Reverse the domain name to send email
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Bob Edwards
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

steamer wrote in message ...
--I've about given up on trying to get some parts AWJ cut out of
2" aluminum plate. Plan B is to make a pattern, make a mold and make some
lost wax versions of it. Can someone suggest where I might find a foundry
that does lost wax casting in or around the San Francisco Bay Area?
--TIA,


Ed --

Try contacting the foundry people at The Crucible, in Oakland. They
do in-house bronze, aluminum, and steel casting. Don't know if they
take on outside job work, but they will probably know who does.

Regards,

Bob


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Bob Edwards
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

steamer wrote in message ...
--I've about given up on trying to get some parts AWJ cut out of
2" aluminum plate. Plan B is to make a pattern, make a mold and make some
lost wax versions of it. Can someone suggest where I might find a foundry
that does lost wax casting in or around the San Francisco Bay Area?
--TIA,


Ed --

Try contacting the foundry people at The Crucible, in Oakland. They
do in-house bronze, aluminum, and steel casting. Don't know if they
take on outside job work, but they will probably know who does.

Regards,

Bob
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Len S
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

I've been to the Crucible in Oakland. They are a school/workshop so I
think you'd have to take a casting class or maybe you can find someone
to do it for you. I've seen them pour bronze. Don't know what's
involved with Al but you should call them. BTW they have shops/classes
for everything from glass making to welding. I took a welding class
there.
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steamer
 
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Default Aluminum foundries in N. Calif?

Bob Edwards wrote:
: Try contacting the foundry people at The Crucible, in Oakland. They
: do in-house bronze, aluminum, and steel casting. Don't know if they
: take on outside job work, but they will probably know who does.
--Thanks; knew about the place but have yet to make the
pilgrimage. Turns out the cost of taking the class is about the same as
the cost of getting my parts AWJ cut! :-) OTOH if I make a pattern and an
RTV mold of it, then squirt a bunch of lost wax parts it gets a *lot*
cheaper...


--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Money talks; it
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : says "Goodbye"...
http://www.nmpproducts.com/intro.htm
---Decks a-wash in a sea of words---
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Engineman1
 
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Default v belt sizes

I reiterate my question from a previous posting:
"I remember having similar belt problems years ago but I'm wondering why belt
manufacturers haven't been able to standardize their length measuring system?"

The world of V-belt sizing is a big ratrace.
I did a little research on the subject and find that in the MSC catalog an A-40
belt would have an outside length of 42.1" and a pitch length of 41.3. This is
what they call a classic V belt. They also have what they call fractional
horsepower belts. In this category a 4L400 has an outside length of 40".
Grainger has A-40's that are 42" on the outside. They have a limited
interchange chart covering 4 manufacturers.Even then nothing is for sure
because Machinery"s Handbook (22nd edition) says a 40" belt has an effective
outside length variation of +1/4, -5/8". This seems to indicate that you could
have 2 new A-40 belts that could differ in length by as much as 7/8" and still
be within tolerance.
The general consensus of Grainger and the handbook is that the only way to
match belts is by pitch length. Here's how the handbook says to determine it.

" The pitch length of a V-belt is determined by placing the belt on a
measuring fixture consisting of two equal diameter sheaves having standard
dimensions and with a total tension of 50 pounds for an A V-belt, 65 pounds for
a B V-belt, 165 pounds for a C V-belt, 300 pounds for a D V-belt, and 400
pounds for an E V-belt. One of the sheaves is fixed in position, while the
other is movable along a graduated scale with the specified tension applied to
it.
The sheaves should be rotated at least two revolutions to seat the belt
properly in the sheave grooves and to equally divide the total tension between
the two strands of the belt. The pitch length is the length obtained by adding
the pitch circumference of one of the measuring sheaves to twice the measured
center distance between them. Deviation of the measured pitch length from the
standard pitch length shown in Table 8 should be within the tolerance limits
also given in this table. (+1/4, -5/8".)
The grooves of the measuring sheaves should be machined and maintained to the
following tolerances: pitch diameter, + - 0.002 inch; groove angle, + - 0
degrees. 20 minutes; and groove top width, + - .002 inch.
Belt Length and Center Distance. - The relation between center distance and
belt pitch length is given by the following formula:

L - 2C + 1.57(D + d) + (d -d squared / 4C)

D - pitch diameter of large sheave, in inches
d - pitch diameter of small sheave, in inches
L - pitch length of belt in inches
C - center distance in inches."

Fun huh? G
Engineman1

To: rec.crafts.metalworking
Date: 6/6/2004


The other day I received a letter from my cousin telling me of his experiences

replacing a drivebelt on a rooftop air conditioner on his church. The old belt
was marked A-40 so to be on the safe side he bought a A-40-1/2. It was way too
tight so he got an A-41. Still too tight so he had to move the motor.

I remember having similar belt problems years ago but I'm wondering why belt
manufacturers haven't been able to standardize their length measuring system?
I change belts almost every day in my job. Belt lengths are standardized. If
the old belt was an A-40 the new one should be an A-40. The old belt

probably was stretched.
Greg


Hey Engineman,


Went through something similar for the lawn tractor just the other

day. The local Husqevarna (SP??) dealer carries Dayco brand belts.
An AP92 is 94 inches long and a AP67 is 69 inches. Just add two
inches to what the "number" is. I asked why, and he says it is
because Dayco measures a belt by the inside or contact circumference,
while some other manufacturers use the outside circumference.

So, a quick go-round with my calculator says that if the belt
"thickness' (depth) is 3/8", then a belt with ID circumference of 92
inches will have diameter of 29.29". Add 3/8" thick for the belt to
get OD diameter of 30.04" and an OD circumference of 94.35.


Chuckle..I just completed a Hardinge HC/OmniTurn retrofit..and did a
direct drive conversion as well by pulling the varidrive, installing
double sheave pulleys etc etc.


I ordered a matching pair of B-88 belts from Graingers..and one was at
least 1" longer than the other. Checking their stock..they tended to
run from 3/8 to 1.5" out of spec.


I ordered a matching pair of Browing belts (which is what I should
have done in the first place but was in a hurry) from my usual source
and they WILL be matching.


Gunner



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Peter H.
 
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Default v belt sizes



The old belt was marked A-40 so to be on the safe side he bought a A-40-1/2. It
was way too tight so he got an A-41.


A-belts are 1-1/2" longer than their marked length.

RMA standards cover A-belts, as these are intended for multi-sheave operations.

Light duty belts (3L, 4L) aren't.

Incredible that Hardinge Bros designed my TM and TL for 3L belts.

Naturally, these have to be specially matched.

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