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Old February 21st 04, 05:08 AM
Gunner
 
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http://www.vetsoutreach.com/GNey/Mark48/
"To be civilized is to restrain the ability to commit mayhem.
To be incapable of committing mayhem is not the mark of the civilized,
merely the domesticated." - Trefor Thomas

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Old February 21st 04, 07:09 AM
jk
 
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Gunner wrote:

http://www.vetsoutreach.com/GNey/Mark48/



Wow. But one question. It says the "The submerged Farncomb fired.....
from over the horizon". When You are submerged, isn't EVERYTHING over
the horizon?

jk
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Old February 21st 04, 05:06 PM
Dan Caster
 
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As I remember the record for sinking a destroyer ( not destoyer escort
) in WWII was something like 10 seconds. A Japanese torpedo hit the
destroyer between the forward engine room and the aft boiler room, and
the whole ship was underwater in the ten seconds.

Dan
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Old February 21st 04, 05:08 PM
jim rozen
 
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In article , jk says...

Gunner wrote:

http://www.vetsoutreach.com/GNey/Mark48/



Wow. But one question. It says the "The submerged Farncomb fired.....
from over the horizon". When You are submerged, isn't EVERYTHING over
the horizon?


g

And another, do they always paint those white crosses
on ships during wartime?

Jim

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Old February 21st 04, 07:49 PM
jim rozen
 
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In article , Dan Caster says...

As I remember the record for sinking a destroyer ( not destoyer escort
) in WWII was something like 10 seconds. A Japanese torpedo hit the
destroyer between the forward engine room and the aft boiler room, and
the whole ship was underwater in the ten seconds.


Actually I was going to say, those photos did look impressive,
but then I suspect that the same scenario played out about
a thousand or so times during ww2. Bang, blub.

Jim

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Old February 22nd 04, 03:10 PM
mikee
 
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You need to read the text again, Jim. The torpedo didn't hit the hull, but
exploded below it. Maximizes blast effect, apparently. WWII stuff was only direct
contact.
See: http://www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/.../wep-torp.html

Mike Eberlein

jim rozen wrote:

In article , Dan Caster says...

As I remember the record for sinking a destroyer ( not destoyer escort
) in WWII was something like 10 seconds. A Japanese torpedo hit the
destroyer between the forward engine room and the aft boiler room, and
the whole ship was underwater in the ten seconds.


Actually I was going to say, those photos did look impressive,
but then I suspect that the same scenario played out about
a thousand or so times during ww2. Bang, blub.

Jim

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==================================================


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Old February 22nd 04, 05:02 PM
jim rozen
 
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In article , mikee says...

You need to read the text again, Jim. The torpedo didn't hit the hull, but
exploded below it. Maximizes blast effect, apparently. WWII stuff was only
direct
contact.


I believe during ww2 they had a number of magnetic
detonators for torpedos. They didn't work very
well and I think most of them were german. But
I doubt very much that the crew of the merchant
ships going to the bottom cared about the exact
mechanism in the fish.

Jim

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Old February 22nd 04, 10:06 PM
mikee
 
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I bet you are correct with that statement.

Mike

jim rozen wrote:

But I doubt very much that the crew of the merchant
ships going to the bottom cared about the exact
mechanism in the fish.

Jim



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Old February 22nd 04, 10:46 PM
jim rozen
 
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In article , mikee says...

I bet you are correct with that statement.


But I doubt very much that the crew of the merchant
ships going to the bottom cared about the exact
mechanism in the fish.


I've been reading a book on U-boat operations
in the atlantic during ww2. A lot of the times
the merchant ships were never really listed as
sunk, they just never showed up. The crew were
often not really well documented, it's not
clear really *how* many men were killed this way.

During the beginning of the war, the germans had
boats that were sailing up into NY harbor, never
challenged.

One story was that a US boat was asked to test the
defenses. They sailed in an used a signal light
to try to get the attention of one of the CG picket
boats. No reply. They had been told to be insistant.

The began firing signal flares across the bow of the
ship! That got some response.

Jim

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