Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old August 18th 03, 10:44 PM
Dan Musicant
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally

My old kitchen stove has a griddle in the middle, which I never use but
I use its cover as a work surface when I'm cooking, preparing food, etc.
It's right between the burners and handy. Thing is, it's so old that the
nickel plating (I THINK it's nickel) has mostly worn off and it looks
awful. It stains, is rusted in places, etc. At first I thought I'd
electroplate it and did a bunch of research on that but discarded the
idea when I came to realize that it's not a simple thing to do and I'd
have to deal with some pretty toxic chemicals. Someone in a newsgroup
suggested using high heat resistant spray paint such as they use on car
engines. I decided this was the way to go.

I bought a can of Dupli-Color High Heat with Ceramic 1200 degree spray
paint at Kragen Auto and finally got around to using it.

Besides the griddle cover, there's the burner trays, which I also intend
to paint. First, though, before tackling these, I decided to paint
something less challenging to get the feel of spray painting with this
stuff. I have a steel cookie sheet that I made myself from a discarded
piece of thick plate steel (probably about 3/32 inch thick) I found a
number of years ago. I never put food on this thing, but I keep it in
the oven and put cookie sheets on top of it. It moderates the flow of
heat to the cookie sheets, which are many times thinner than the plate
beneath, and this prevents burning of cookies or whatever else I bake on
the cookie sheets. This sheet is ordinary steel and it's always had a
tendency to rust. So, I reasoned, if I can sand it smooth, I can paint
it with this high heat spray paint and it will look nice and I won't get
rust all over my hands every time I handle it. Besides that, it's good
practice using this spray paint before I tackle the griddle cover, which
I want to look nice. The paint itself is Aluminum color, "DH1606", which
I figured would look reasonably like the rest of the stove top. This is
an old O'Keefe and Merritt range probably from the mid-1950's.

I sanded the steel sheet with my finishing sander and finished it with
the high heat paint and it looks nice, but it still smells when it heat
it to around 400 degrees. I think it starts to stink at around 300. Not
only that, but at these temperatures, it seems to be very prone to
scratch. That doesn't bother me so much as the smell, which is not nice.
I suppose I can remove it with paint remover and go to plan B. What
might plan B be???

I figure that the griddle cover might not get so hot (probably won't)
that it will stink, even when I use the oven under it, but I suppose
that spraying the burner trays with this stuff isn't a good idea. They
will probably get fairly hot sometimes and stink up the place when I'm
using the burners.

Thanks much for any help.

Dan

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Old August 19th 03, 12:49 AM
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally


Thanks much for any help.

Dan

best bet is to throw the stove out and get a new one... the paint that
you have on there will give you headaches if you breath it and possible
lung damage......
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Old August 19th 03, 02:12 PM
RonC9876
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally

Dan: Bake your painted articles in your barbeque grill for a couple of hours at
the high heat setting. This will bake off that nasty smell and make things
tolerable.
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Old August 19th 03, 11:20 PM
Dan Musicant
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally

On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 18:49:58 -0500, "
wrote:

:
: Thanks much for any help.
:
: Dan
:best bet is to throw the stove out and get a new one... the paint that
:you have on there will give you headaches if you breath it and possible
:lung damage......

When I bought my new refrigerator a couple years ago I looked at the
ranges they were selling, and they had a lot of them, including high end
kitchen stuff and some professional ranges (some small) for restaurants.
I wasn't impressed. Most of the new stuff is small and doesn't have a
preparation surface like this stove has. It doesn't look great, but if I
can paint or coat those pieces it's be OK for me for a while. Whether or
not the fumes from this paint are bad for me is an issue I should look
into, possibly, but it's hard for me to believe they'd sell this paint
for high temperature applications if it were that dangerous. No
headaches so far...



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Old August 19th 03, 11:30 PM
Dan Musicant
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally

On 19 Aug 2003 10:00:47 -0700, (Stan Schaefer)
wrote:

(RonC9876) wrote in message ...
: Dan: Bake your painted articles in your barbeque grill for a couple of hours at
: the high heat setting. This will bake off that nasty smell and make things
: tolerable.
:
:We have a winna! Most of these high-temp paints require, repeat
:REQUIRE, high temperatures to cure. I've used a bunch of this stuff
n headers and mufflers, also on my plumber's furnace, they all
:required extended baking at high temps before they quit stinking. On
:the headers, the smoke quit coming off after about 15 minutes, but
:they still smelled for days afterwards when I drove the car. I don't
:think a bake oven is going to do the job. With the furnace, after I
:fired it up for an extended session of about 4 hours, the paint was
:cured. This runs hot enough to make the bottom of the cast iron
:crucible red hot. Hasn't peeled yet, either.
:
:Stan

OK! Thanks! I'll crank up the oven to the highest setting. The knob goes
to 500, has another gradation that would be 575, and has a last one that
says "Broil". Maybe it will get up to 600 degrees on Broil. I'll leave
it there an hour or two and see if that does the trick. I think the
smell has been getting a little weaker since I painted it around 5 weeks
ago, but it's still there. Only gone up to around 400, though. Will see
if max temperature will cure it. I don't have any way to get it up to
800 degrees or so, though!

Dan

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Old August 20th 03, 12:43 AM
Bob Engelhardt
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally

If you can't get the stink out of the paint, how about using a piece of
stainless for the griddle cover?
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Old August 20th 03, 07:38 PM
Dan Musicant
 
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Default 1200 degree High heat spray paint stinks, literally

On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 19:43:23 -0400, Bob Engelhardt
wrote:

:If you can't get the stink out of the paint, how about using a piece of
:stainless for the griddle cover?
Well, it would have to fit and that's the problem. This thing has
rounded corners, maybe with around a one inch radius, and it's turned
down 90 degrees all the way around. I don't think there's any way I
could fashion the stainless plate to the needed configuration.



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