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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

I finally got my washing machine installed and turned it on with a load
of laundry.

Machine:

110.91511100 - Whirlpool built direct drive style Sears washer, top
loader, large, built in 1995.

The water came out of the top of the standpipe when the machine was
pumping water out the drain hose. The standpipe is 2 inch. I'd run a
hose down it for a couple of minutes (flow rate about 5 gallons/minute)
to make sure it could handle that. This pipe hadn't seen any flow for
over 20 years at least. Satisfied that it could handle 5 gallons/minute,
I figured I was OK.

Today I finished setting up what I thought would be an adequate drain
for the machine. I attached 2 inch black PVC including a trap and
extension, properly gluing it all together. The trap accommodates a
hand-tightened nut in the middle. The top of the extension tube is 37.5
inches above the floor, well above the 34 minimum recommended by Sears.

I'd duct-taped the drain hose so it couldn't come out of the extension
tube from the force of the water. When it came to the point in the
machine's cycle where it did the first basket drain, I was surprised to
see the water spurting out the top. At least 5 gallons must have come
out on my wood laundry room floor and I felt like an idiot for duct
taping the hose into the tube because I had to remove that fast so I
could start collecting the water in 5 gallon buckets, which I did have
right by.

I turned the machine off and repositioned the trap so it didn't twist 20
degrees or so (the way I had it). I reasoned that maybe this diversion
was causing the water to back up. But the first expulsion of rinse water
(after repositioning the trap) still backed up out the top of the
extension tube.

I didn't know the washing machine would pump out the water that fast. It
must have been coming out at a rate something like 20 gallons/minute.

I'm wondering if there's any chance this will work if I remove the trap
and just put a tube straight up from the stand pipe. Or is the problem
that the stand pipe just can't take that kind of flow? I never smelled
anything from that stand pipe (like I say, it wasn't used for over 20
years), and I don't know what it connects to or if it's vented. The
stand pipe goes under the floor, has a 90 degree elbow (to go
horizontal), then a 10 inch straight and another 90 degree elbow to send
it down through the concrete foundation of this laundry room extension
to the house. This extension looks like an afterthough, and maybe they
skimped on the plumbing, etc. I have no idea when it was done, but the
house was built in 1910.

Do I have to have this replumbed before I can install a washing machine?
Thanks for any help with this.
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Speedy Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:

I finally got my washing machine installed and turned it on with a load
of laundry.

Machine:

110.91511100 - Whirlpool built direct drive style Sears washer, top
loader, large, built in 1995.

The water came out of the top of the standpipe when the machine was
pumping water out the drain hose. The standpipe is 2 inch. I'd run a
hose down it for a couple of minutes (flow rate about 5 gallons/minute)
to make sure it could handle that. This pipe hadn't seen any flow for
over 20 years at least. Satisfied that it could handle 5 gallons/minute,
I figured I was OK.


SNIP

Chances are that old pipe is at least partly blocked with (?).
Does the routing look like it could be snaked out?
If it's all accessible, you may be ahead of the game to
re-pipe it with ABS.

Jim
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Speedy Jim
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:

I finally got my washing machine installed and turned it on with a load
of laundry.

Machine:

110.91511100 - Whirlpool built direct drive style Sears washer, top
loader, large, built in 1995.

The water came out of the top of the standpipe when the machine was
pumping water out the drain hose. The standpipe is 2 inch. I'd run a
hose down it for a couple of minutes (flow rate about 5 gallons/minute)
to make sure it could handle that. This pipe hadn't seen any flow for
over 20 years at least. Satisfied that it could handle 5 gallons/minute,
I figured I was OK.


You had at one point talked about a laundry tub.
If you can squeeze a small single tub (poly?) in the space
and route the washer drain into the tub, that may solve the
overflow problem. The tub acts as an accumulator.
Jim
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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 15:42:26 -0500, Speedy Jim wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote:
:
: I finally got my washing machine installed and turned it on with a load
: of laundry.
:
: Machine:
:
: 110.91511100 - Whirlpool built direct drive style Sears washer, top
: loader, large, built in 1995.
:
: The water came out of the top of the standpipe when the machine was
: pumping water out the drain hose. The standpipe is 2 inch. I'd run a
: hose down it for a couple of minutes (flow rate about 5 gallons/minute)
: to make sure it could handle that. This pipe hadn't seen any flow for
: over 20 years at least. Satisfied that it could handle 5 gallons/minute,
: I figured I was OK.
:
:SNIP
:
:Chances are that old pipe is at least partly blocked with (?).
oes the routing look like it could be snaked out?
:If it's all accessible, you may be ahead of the game to
:re-pipe it with ABS.
:
:Jim

Jim, all I can see of it is the last 4-5 feet or so. The last 2 feet
there's two right-angle bends. Then it goes right through the concrete
foundation, of the laundry room add-on, pointing not straight down, but
at around a 45 degree angle. I guess I could try snaking out that last
4-5 feet.

I don't know anything about snaking pipes. Hints? Can I get something at
Home Depot?

Thanks!!


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Speedy Jim
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:
SNIP
Jim, all I can see of it is the last 4-5 feet or so. The last 2 feet
there's two right-angle bends. Then it goes right through the concrete
foundation, of the laundry room add-on, pointing not straight down, but
at around a 45 degree angle. I guess I could try snaking out that last
4-5 feet.

I don't know anything about snaking pipes. Hints? Can I get something at
Home Depot?


Better off renting a drain cleaning machine. Tell them the size
of the pipe and # of bends and they can recommend one.
Jim


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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 15:45:47 -0500, Speedy Jim wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote:
:
: I finally got my washing machine installed and turned it on with a load
: of laundry.
:
: Machine:
:
: 110.91511100 - Whirlpool built direct drive style Sears washer, top
: loader, large, built in 1995.
:
: The water came out of the top of the standpipe when the machine was
: pumping water out the drain hose. The standpipe is 2 inch. I'd run a
: hose down it for a couple of minutes (flow rate about 5 gallons/minute)
: to make sure it could handle that. This pipe hadn't seen any flow for
: over 20 years at least. Satisfied that it could handle 5 gallons/minute,
: I figured I was OK.
:
: You had at one point talked about a laundry tub.
: If you can squeeze a small single tub (poly?) in the space
: and route the washer drain into the tub, that may solve the
: overflow problem. The tub acts as an accumulator.
:Jim

Absolutely, and I was thinking about just that an hour or so after it
happened. I'm wondering if I can find one small enough. Do they have
them at HD? If I can find a sink that's only 2 feet wide, it will JUST
fit. Maybe I can fit one if it's only 2 feet from front to back, if I
turn it sideways, that is.

Easiest thing to try right now would be my idea of removing the trap and
trying a straight run of 2 inch PVC, or ABS or whatever they call this
stuff (black 2 inch plastic). That would cost me less than $5 (adaptor +
2 feet of pipe, or just the adaptor if I want to cut the pipe from the
trap I already have... but if I do that, I can't reuse that trap later).

I live a block or so from a tool lending library. Guess I'll ask them if
I can borrow a drain snake.
  #7   Report Post  
art
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

If it's galvanized, it's a good bet that it's heavily rusted on the
inside.... probably to the point where the inside diameter is down to around
1 inch or so. I had this same problem with a 2" glavanized line that was 80
years old and it was down to 1/2' diameter! I used the sink "accumulator"
method but after a while i just had to replace the line. Best if you can
repipe to the main drain.......snaking it will only push a lot of corroded,
rusty junk into the main drain and who knows what problems that might
bring....

Art


"Horatio Hornblower" wrote in message
...
I finally got my washing machine installed and turned it on with a load
of laundry.

Machine:

110.91511100 - Whirlpool built direct drive style Sears washer, top
loader, large, built in 1995.

The water came out of the top of the standpipe when the machine was
pumping water out the drain hose. The standpipe is 2 inch. I'd run a
hose down it for a couple of minutes (flow rate about 5 gallons/minute)
to make sure it could handle that. This pipe hadn't seen any flow for
over 20 years at least. Satisfied that it could handle 5 gallons/minute,
I figured I was OK.

Today I finished setting up what I thought would be an adequate drain
for the machine. I attached 2 inch black PVC including a trap and
extension, properly gluing it all together. The trap accommodates a
hand-tightened nut in the middle. The top of the extension tube is 37.5
inches above the floor, well above the 34 minimum recommended by Sears.

I'd duct-taped the drain hose so it couldn't come out of the extension
tube from the force of the water. When it came to the point in the
machine's cycle where it did the first basket drain, I was surprised to
see the water spurting out the top. At least 5 gallons must have come
out on my wood laundry room floor and I felt like an idiot for duct
taping the hose into the tube because I had to remove that fast so I
could start collecting the water in 5 gallon buckets, which I did have
right by.

I turned the machine off and repositioned the trap so it didn't twist 20
degrees or so (the way I had it). I reasoned that maybe this diversion
was causing the water to back up. But the first expulsion of rinse water
(after repositioning the trap) still backed up out the top of the
extension tube.

I didn't know the washing machine would pump out the water that fast. It
must have been coming out at a rate something like 20 gallons/minute.

I'm wondering if there's any chance this will work if I remove the trap
and just put a tube straight up from the stand pipe. Or is the problem
that the stand pipe just can't take that kind of flow? I never smelled
anything from that stand pipe (like I say, it wasn't used for over 20
years), and I don't know what it connects to or if it's vented. The
stand pipe goes under the floor, has a 90 degree elbow (to go
horizontal), then a 10 inch straight and another 90 degree elbow to send
it down through the concrete foundation of this laundry room extension
to the house. This extension looks like an afterthough, and maybe they
skimped on the plumbing, etc. I have no idea when it was done, but the
house was built in 1910.

Do I have to have this replumbed before I can install a washing machine?
Thanks for any help with this.



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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 22:10:01 GMT, "art" wrote:

:If it's galvanized, it's a good bet that it's heavily rusted on the
:inside.... probably to the point where the inside diameter is down to around
:1 inch or so. I had this same problem with a 2" glavanized line that was 80
:years old and it was down to 1/2' diameter! I used the sink "accumulator"
:method but after a while i just had to replace the line. Best if you can
:repipe to the main drain.......snaking it will only push a lot of corroded,
:rusty junk into the main drain and who knows what problems that might
:bring....
:
:Art

Thanks. I went to the tool lending library (I was told that it's the
only one west of the Mississippi!) in Berkeley (a block from me) and
borrowed (free!) a snake that's 25 feet long and you hand crank it into
and out of the drain. It was quite a job. I was about to run an outside
cold water hose into it to try to flush it afterward but then had a
better idea. Instead I did a wash with no clothes, maximum water and
HOT. This forced some hot water down the drain and I thought I heard it
backing up and turned the machine off for a couple seconds. Turned it
back on and left it on and the water didn't back up. Didn't even sound
like it would back up. So, for the time being it is clear.

Hope I didn't screw up my drain system. When I brought the snake out it
had some muddy stuff on it and there was a clump of longish threads -
obviously whoever had a machine on there didn't filter the drain water.

I bought stainless steel lint traps yesterday for the drain hose but the
package says to use it with a laundry sink, not a stand pipe. I can't
imagine why. I think I'll use the traps anyway. I suppose I really only
need one and can clean it periodically.


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art
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

That muddy stuff is probably the rust residue....good fortune smiles on
those whose drains get clear the first time! Buy a lottery ticket! But think
about repiping that line....washing machines are the toughest things on
drain lines. They pump out a lot of water very quickly and can easily (as
you've found out) overwhelm the drain lines. Anything else is draining a
little slower and you have time to shut it off but washing machines are
usually unattended...

Art




"Horatio Hornblower" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 22:10:01 GMT, "art" wrote:

:If it's galvanized, it's a good bet that it's heavily rusted on the
:inside.... probably to the point where the inside diameter is down to

around
:1 inch or so. I had this same problem with a 2" glavanized line that was

80
:years old and it was down to 1/2' diameter! I used the sink "accumulator"
:method but after a while i just had to replace the line. Best if you can
:repipe to the main drain.......snaking it will only push a lot of

corroded,
:rusty junk into the main drain and who knows what problems that might
:bring....
:
:Art

Thanks. I went to the tool lending library (I was told that it's the
only one west of the Mississippi!) in Berkeley (a block from me) and
borrowed (free!) a snake that's 25 feet long and you hand crank it into
and out of the drain. It was quite a job. I was about to run an outside
cold water hose into it to try to flush it afterward but then had a
better idea. Instead I did a wash with no clothes, maximum water and
HOT. This forced some hot water down the drain and I thought I heard it
backing up and turned the machine off for a couple seconds. Turned it
back on and left it on and the water didn't back up. Didn't even sound
like it would back up. So, for the time being it is clear.

Hope I didn't screw up my drain system. When I brought the snake out it
had some muddy stuff on it and there was a clump of longish threads -
obviously whoever had a machine on there didn't filter the drain water.

I bought stainless steel lint traps yesterday for the drain hose but the
package says to use it with a laundry sink, not a stand pipe. I can't
imagine why. I think I'll use the traps anyway. I suppose I really only
need one and can clean it periodically.




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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 03:16:17 GMT, "art" wrote:

:That muddy stuff is probably the rust residue....good fortune smiles on
:those whose drains get clear the first time! Buy a lottery ticket! But think
:about repiping that line....washing machines are the toughest things on
:drain lines. They pump out a lot of water very quickly and can easily (as
:you've found out) overwhelm the drain lines. Anything else is draining a
:little slower and you have time to shut it off but washing machines are
:usually unattended...
:
:Art

No fooling! And it won't surprise me if one day (and maybe soon) the
damned thing overflows again. I figure I'll watch it like a hawk for a
while, but I figure I'm sure to get complacent and just when I do, the
flood will occur.

I couldn't believe how fast the water was coming out of that hose!

I'm for sure going to put a lint trap on it. I think there's a good
chance that lint is a significant player in the flood I had yesterday. A
small clump was attached to the snake when I finally got it all out of
the pipe. I screwed and jammed all 25 feet of that thing in there. That
clump of "lint" included some threads over an inch long. That made me
wonder if it wouldn't be a good idea to put drano down there but I guess
it would be a waste. Probably Jim's idea of a drain cleaning machine is
the best, if I want to keep using this drain, or replacement with ABS
(also Jim's idea). Thing is, I can only get at the last 4-5 feet of that
pipe. That I could replace with ABS, but I have no way of knowing if
there's trouble further down that pipe. I suppose it might be possible
to run another pipe from the "main drain", whatever that is and
whereever it is. I'm for sure going to talk it all over with my general
contractor when I start tackling the major issues with this house
(starting with the foundation, with the roof following close behind).

I'm going to pursue another of Jim's ideas, probably today: I'll go down
to Home Depot and see if they have a laundry sink that will fit in the
room. That would provide a lot of peace of mind.

hh

:"Horatio Hornblower" wrote in message
.. .
: On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 22:10:01 GMT, "art" wrote:
:
: :If it's galvanized, it's a good bet that it's heavily rusted on the
: :inside.... probably to the point where the inside diameter is down to
:around
: :1 inch or so. I had this same problem with a 2" glavanized line that was
:80
: :years old and it was down to 1/2' diameter! I used the sink "accumulator"
: :method but after a while i just had to replace the line. Best if you can
: :repipe to the main drain.......snaking it will only push a lot of
:corroded,
: :rusty junk into the main drain and who knows what problems that might
: :bring....
: :
: :Art
:
: Thanks. I went to the tool lending library (I was told that it's the
: only one west of the Mississippi!) in Berkeley (a block from me) and
: borrowed (free!) a snake that's 25 feet long and you hand crank it into
: and out of the drain. It was quite a job. I was about to run an outside
: cold water hose into it to try to flush it afterward but then had a
: better idea. Instead I did a wash with no clothes, maximum water and
: HOT. This forced some hot water down the drain and I thought I heard it
: backing up and turned the machine off for a couple seconds. Turned it
: back on and left it on and the water didn't back up. Didn't even sound
: like it would back up. So, for the time being it is clear.
:
: Hope I didn't screw up my drain system. When I brought the snake out it
: had some muddy stuff on it and there was a clump of longish threads -
: obviously whoever had a machine on there didn't filter the drain water.
:
: I bought stainless steel lint traps yesterday for the drain hose but the
: package says to use it with a laundry sink, not a stand pipe. I can't
: imagine why. I think I'll use the traps anyway. I suppose I really only
: need one and can clean it periodically.
:
:
:



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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Went to Home Depot today and they had a laundry sink that JUST FIT in my
space. Another 1/4 inch, or even 1/8 inch and I wouldn't have gotten it
in there unless I moved the water heater, and it can only move 1/2 inch
- assuming I could move it at all, being filled with water and all.

Hooking the sink up to the drain is a problem and what I think I'm going
to do is scuttle the trap that I have. I could use it except that it's
put together with glue. I need to put an extension in it of around 4
inches so it will reach the sink. Can't do that cause it's glued, so
I'll have to buy another 2 inch trap.

I figure it's a lot of extra security. Someday, that thing was going to
back up again, maybe sooner than later. It's just a black box and I
don't know what shape it's in. Right now it works (the standpipe), but I
have no way of knowing if it's something I can depend on for 10-20 years
or just a month.
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Speedy Jim
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:

Went to Home Depot today and they had a laundry sink that JUST FIT in my
space. Another 1/4 inch, or even 1/8 inch and I wouldn't have gotten it
in there unless I moved the water heater, and it can only move 1/2 inch
- assuming I could move it at all, being filled with water and all.

Hooking the sink up to the drain is a problem and what I think I'm going
to do is scuttle the trap that I have. I could use it except that it's
put together with glue. I need to put an extension in it of around 4
inches so it will reach the sink. Can't do that cause it's glued, so
I'll have to buy another 2 inch trap.

I figure it's a lot of extra security. Someday, that thing was going to
back up again, maybe sooner than later. It's just a black box and I
don't know what shape it's in. Right now it works (the standpipe), but I
have no way of knowing if it's something I can depend on for 10-20 years
or just a month.


The laundry tub outlet will be 1 1/2" (tubular size) like a kitchen
sink.
Get rid of all the 2" stuff sigh.

Put the old galv elbow back on and buy a 1 1/2" plastic P-trap
intended for sinks (comes with compression slip nuts).
(Of course you'll need to extend things to get to the sink outlet.)

Jim
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Horatio Hornblower
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:21:42 -0500, Speedy Jim wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote:
:
: Went to Home Depot today and they had a laundry sink that JUST FIT in my
: space. Another 1/4 inch, or even 1/8 inch and I wouldn't have gotten it
: in there unless I moved the water heater, and it can only move 1/2 inch
: - assuming I could move it at all, being filled with water and all.
:
: Hooking the sink up to the drain is a problem and what I think I'm going
: to do is scuttle the trap that I have. I could use it except that it's
: put together with glue. I need to put an extension in it of around 4
: inches so it will reach the sink. Can't do that cause it's glued, so
: I'll have to buy another 2 inch trap.
:
: I figure it's a lot of extra security. Someday, that thing was going to
: back up again, maybe sooner than later. It's just a black box and I
: don't know what shape it's in. Right now it works (the standpipe), but I
: have no way of knowing if it's something I can depend on for 10-20 years
: or just a month.
:
:The laundry tub outlet will be 1 1/2" (tubular size) like a kitchen
:sink.
:Get rid of all the 2" stuff sigh.
:
:Put the old galv elbow back on and buy a 1 1/2" plastic P-trap
:intended for sinks (comes with compression slip nuts).
Of course you'll need to extend things to get to the sink outlet.)
:
:Jim

Thanks, Jim. Yep, I'm aware that the sink outlet is 1.5 inch. I figured
this while at HD: Why not use the trap I have instead of getting one of
those 1.5 inch white PVC traps? Anyway, the kit they had ($7) was
configured to connect to a pipe coming out of a wall horizontally. I'd
need more fittings to make it work.

Unfortunately (well, it was no surprise at all) the 2 inch trap didn't
quite reach the sink outlet (4 inches short, actually). I figure this:

That elbow, well, I could put it back on, but it would have to face the
opposite direction from where it was - very doable. But - that elbow
only had about 2 parallel threads that weren't badly rusted. It's a
wonder I got it off at all. It was only the pounding with two hammers
simultaneously that got it loose enough where I could crank it off with
my 18 inch pipe wrench. The standpipe's threads look fine, at least from
the side I could see it. I wire brushed them and even applied some 3in1
oil to them with an old tooth brush, hoping that would prevent further
rusting.

Picking through the many bins of plastic pipe fittings at Home Depot
yesterday I came up with two I decided to buy with the sink:

1. Thick black plastic (is that what they call ABS?) 1.5 inch connector
that connects nicely to the sink outlet that has a 1.5 inch male
opposite end.

2. Same material 1.5 inch to 2 inch adapter.

The two of them cost me around $2.50.

I figure that it will only cost me $10-12 or so to get another 2 inch
P-trap, along with another 2 inch female to screw onto the standpipe,
and included I'll get a 2 inch connector - female at both ends to
accommodate the 4 inch or so extension (that will actually go in the
middle of the P-trap) I'll need to make this reach the sink. Once the
end of the extended P-trap is right underneath the sink outlet, a short
piece of 2 inch straight will finish the connection to the 1.5-2
adapter.

My only concern is that if I glue it up, it won't be adjustable, and I
figure there's no way I'm going to know exactly if it will fit, so I
can't glue it at least until I'm sure it all fits. Maybe then I'll try
gluing it all together, or maybe I'll use duct tape for at least one of
the joints. I figure I can figure out how to make it leak free. I'm
pretty sure I'll be able to disassemble it all and remove the sink and
the trap if and when I want to even if I glue it all up (the room needs
paint bad, and I'm going to need to get the washer and sink out of
there). I will be able to get it all out because I'll get one of the 2
inch traps that have a nut in the middle (like the one I have now).

I really like the thick ABS (?) stuff compared to that flimsy thin white
PVC stuff.

I'm due to replace that water heater, cause it's about 12 years old and
an accident waiting to happen according to my brother. I was thinking of
a 50 gallon but now I think I will put another 40 gallon in there
because there's NO room to spare! In fact, I will try to free up a bit
more space. I could get another 2-3 inches by moving it left almost to
the gas connection, but there's a pipe whose function I don't know (I
bet you do). It's sweated copper, and I just noticed it yesterday. The
hot water out and cold water in are galvanized, but this copper comes
from the top of the tank and is connected to a steam blow-off valve. It
goes horizontally to the side of the tank and then goes down through the
floor. What's that?
  #14   Report Post  
Speedy Jim
 
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Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:

SNIP,SNIP
I'm due to replace that water heater, cause it's about 12 years old and
an accident waiting to happen according to my brother. I was thinking of
a 50 gallon but now I think I will put another 40 gallon in there
because there's NO room to spare! In fact, I will try to free up a bit
more space. I could get another 2-3 inches by moving it left almost to
the gas connection, but there's a pipe whose function I don't know (I
bet you do). It's sweated copper, and I just noticed it yesterday. The
hot water out and cold water in are galvanized, but this copper comes
from the top of the tank and is connected to a steam blow-off valve. It
goes horizontally to the side of the tank and then goes down through the
floor. What's that?


That's a very old pressure relief valve. It dumps steam/hot water
under the floor (somewhere?) if it ever opens.

Jim
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Speedy Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:

SNIP,SNIP
My only concern is that if I glue it up, it won't be adjustable, and I
figure there's no way I'm going to know exactly if it will fit, so I
can't glue it at least until I'm sure it all fits. Maybe then I'll try
gluing it all together, or maybe I'll use duct tape for at least one of
the joints. I figure I can figure out how to make it leak free. I'm
pretty sure I'll be able to disassemble it all and remove the sink and
the trap if and when I want to even if I glue it all up (the room needs
paint bad, and I'm going to need to get the washer and sink out of
there). I will be able to get it all out because I'll get one of the 2
inch traps that have a nut in the middle (like the one I have now).


Pick up a 2" "No-Hub" coupling. Cut the 2" ABS somewhere and put the
coupling in; that will let you disconnect at a later time and will
also give you a little freedom in aligning things.

Jim


  #16   Report Post  
Horatio Hornblower
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:19:01 -0500, Speedy Jim wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote:
:
:SNIP,SNIP
: My only concern is that if I glue it up, it won't be adjustable, and I
: figure there's no way I'm going to know exactly if it will fit, so I
: can't glue it at least until I'm sure it all fits. Maybe then I'll try
: gluing it all together, or maybe I'll use duct tape for at least one of
: the joints. I figure I can figure out how to make it leak free. I'm
: pretty sure I'll be able to disassemble it all and remove the sink and
: the trap if and when I want to even if I glue it all up (the room needs
: paint bad, and I'm going to need to get the washer and sink out of
: there). I will be able to get it all out because I'll get one of the 2
: inch traps that have a nut in the middle (like the one I have now).
:
: Pick up a 2" "No-Hub" coupling. Cut the 2" ABS somewhere and put the
: coupling in; that will let you disconnect at a later time and will
: also give you a little freedom in aligning things.
:
:Jim


Good, good thinking! I'm not sure, though, that there's enough room for
that no-hub coupler. Gotta see. I'm downright obsessed right now with
getting this right! I hope today's the day. Thanks for your help!!
  #17   Report Post  
Horatio Hornblower
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:19:01 -0500, Speedy Jim wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote:
:
:SNIP,SNIP
: My only concern is that if I glue it up, it won't be adjustable, and I
: figure there's no way I'm going to know exactly if it will fit, so I
: can't glue it at least until I'm sure it all fits. Maybe then I'll try
: gluing it all together, or maybe I'll use duct tape for at least one of
: the joints. I figure I can figure out how to make it leak free. I'm
: pretty sure I'll be able to disassemble it all and remove the sink and
: the trap if and when I want to even if I glue it all up (the room needs
: paint bad, and I'm going to need to get the washer and sink out of
: there). I will be able to get it all out because I'll get one of the 2
: inch traps that have a nut in the middle (like the one I have now).
:
: Pick up a 2" "No-Hub" coupling. Cut the 2" ABS somewhere and put the
: coupling in; that will let you disconnect at a later time and will
: also give you a little freedom in aligning things.
:
:Jim
Do you know off hand how long a 2 inch no-hub coupling is? I haven't
measured yet exactly with everything in place. I think I will be using
about a 4 inch piece of 2 inch straight, that is unless I use that
coupling. The coupling gives me the adjustability and flexibility I need
to get it all apart. Other than that I figure that I'll need to either
leave one of the fittings unglued (duct tape and hope), or maybe put the
sink on risers of some kind (at least 1/4 inch). I need that 1/4+ inch
of play to get the nutted connector in the P-Trap apart.
  #18   Report Post  
John Hines
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Horatio Hornblower wrote:

On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:19:01 -0500, Speedy Jim wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote:
:
:SNIP,SNIP
: My only concern is that if I glue it up, it won't be adjustable, and I
: figure there's no way I'm going to know exactly if it will fit, so I
: can't glue it at least until I'm sure it all fits. Maybe then I'll try
: gluing it all together, or maybe I'll use duct tape for at least one of
: the joints. I figure I can figure out how to make it leak free. I'm
: pretty sure I'll be able to disassemble it all and remove the sink and
: the trap if and when I want to even if I glue it all up (the room needs
: paint bad, and I'm going to need to get the washer and sink out of
: there). I will be able to get it all out because I'll get one of the 2
: inch traps that have a nut in the middle (like the one I have now).
:
: Pick up a 2" "No-Hub" coupling. Cut the 2" ABS somewhere and put the
: coupling in; that will let you disconnect at a later time and will
: also give you a little freedom in aligning things.
:
:Jim
Do you know off hand how long a 2 inch no-hub coupling is?


2 and half inches. At least the ones in my newly opened up wall are.

  #19   Report Post  
Horatio Hornblower
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

On 22 Feb 2004 16:23:44 GMT, "(none)" (None) wrote:

:Horatio Hornblower wrote in
:
:
: Do you know off hand how long a 2 inch no-hub coupling is?
:
:Three and a half inches. I happen to have one on hand from repairing a soil
ipe.
:
Thanks. The one I just bought at Home Depot is 3 3/8 inches. Today, I
assemble.

I'm wondering another thing. Do you have to affix the drain hose to the
laundry sink? I'm worried it will jump off the edge. Actually, I got an
idea to have a piece of plywood on top of the sink with a hole in it for
the drain hose and something on the other side to hold the drain hose in
the hole! Well, actually that "something" is going to be my stainless
steel lint trap.
  #20   Report Post  
Horatio Hornblower
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

I'm assembling the drain right now.

I'm wondering a couple of things:

1. Should I use teflon tape in the 2 inch P-Trap nut?

2. Should I (eventually) install one of two spigots on the laundry sink?
I figure it would be good to have one to wash the soap scum (I assume
that some will accumulate) out of the sink since I'll want to dump the
washed clothes in there to sort (some into dryer, some on hangers to
dry, etc.).


  #21   Report Post  
Horatio Hornblower
 
Posts: n/a
Default Washing machine drain backs up!

Got it all put together - laundry tub, 2 inch P-trap, no-hub connector.
I even fixed the leak I had in my cold water pipe today. I'm convinced
I finally got it all right and did my second load of laundry today. This
is my first washing machine ever and I'm pretty excited about it. Next
is to install the dryer, but the washer's the big deal. Thanks to all
who helped.
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