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Old September 1st 03, 04:56 PM
Lorne
 
Posts: n/a
Default Removing a sink

The living room has a 6-foot wide wet bar area with a sink at one end.
We've never used the faucets and sink, so we plan to remove it all and
replace the countertop to give us a usable 6-foot flat surface.

The house does not have copper pipe - all of the supply lines are grey
PVC. For this particular sink, the hot and cold supply come out of the
floor and go directly to the faucet. I don't have access to the
connection in the basement because the ceiling is finished. So what I
have is two tubes coming from the floor.

Removing the sink seems easy, and closing off the drain doesn't look that
complicated. But clearly I have to securely close off these supply
lines, and make sure the suckers don't leak. Since I can't do it at
source in the basement, I have to install some kind of valves under the
sink to shut it all off. I've never done this or seen it done.

So before I go to the home depot and ask for advice there, what wisdom
can this group offer me?

Thanks in advance

--
Lorne Sundby

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Old September 1st 03, 05:22 PM
I-zheet M'drurz
 
Posts: n/a
Default Removing a sink

On 01 Sep 2003, Lorne wrote:

The living room has a 6-foot wide wet bar area with a sink at one end.
We've never used the faucets and sink, so we plan to remove it all
and replace the countertop to give us a usable 6-foot flat surface.

The house does not have copper pipe - all of the supply lines are grey
PVC. For this particular sink, the hot and cold supply come out of
the floor and go directly to the faucet. I don't have access to the
connection in the basement because the ceiling is finished. So what I
have is two tubes coming from the floor.

Removing the sink seems easy, and closing off the drain doesn't look
that complicated. But clearly I have to securely close off these
supply lines, and make sure the suckers don't leak. Since I can't do
it at source in the basement, I have to install some kind of valves
under the sink to shut it all off. I've never done this or seen it
done.

So before I go to the home depot and ask for advice there, what wisdom
can this group offer me?


Cut 'em and cap 'em.

Assuming you have a saw of some sort, you'll need 2 caps (buy 4,
in case you screw up, they're not removable) PVC cleaner/primer
and PVC adhesive/cement.

Turn off the main water supply valve and the one going in to your
water heater, open the faucets and drain as much water as possible
before you cut the pipes. DON'T try to cut them too close to the
floor, leave a nice long stub in case the next home owner wants
to use them again. In fact, if you screw up the next step, YOU
will have to cut some more off, so leave as much stub as you can
stand (it's going to be hidden under the sink anyway, right?)

If you have NEVER worked with PVC pipe and adhesive before, please
do some more research or get somebody to help who is experienced.
While it's a fairly simple process, there is no room for error, the
adhesive sets up QUICKLY, and if you don't get it coated properly
you will have leaks.

Cut the pipes with just about any saw (jig-, circular-, chain- g)
DRY them thoroughly, CLEAN them thoroughly, and use plenty of
adhesive to apply the caps. By all means have somebody standing
there looking for leaks as you turn the water back on. You could
use valves insted of caps, but that leaves you exposed to somebody
(kids, grandkids?) opening them by accident and sending you for
the mop (or the homeowner's insurance).

--
TP
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Old September 1st 03, 05:30 PM
Dan G
 
Posts: n/a
Default Removing a sink

Go back to the basement. I would think there will be some valves on
those lines at some point, maybe not right under them. Look for an
access panel in the bottom of the cabinet or under the cabinet.

You will need to be able to stop the water flow to disconnect and to
modify. It may require killing the entire house, usually back where the
hot water tank is.

If you cannot find any localized shutoffs, you will need to know what
size pipe with which you are dealing. You can buy two compression angle
stops ($2 or $3 each). You are probably dealing with either 1/2" supply
lines or 3/8" lines. You can install the stops on either size pipe and
turn off the valve. This is not the ideal method, but will work well
and allow for future re-use of the system.
--


Keep the whole world singing. . .
Dan G

(remove the 7)



"Lorne" wrote in message
...
The living room has a 6-foot wide wet bar area with a sink at one end.
We've never used the faucets and sink, so we plan to remove it all and
replace the countertop to give us a usable 6-foot flat surface.

The house does not have copper pipe - all of the supply lines are grey
PVC. For this particular sink, the hot and cold supply come out of

the
floor and go directly to the faucet. I don't have access to the
connection in the basement because the ceiling is finished. So what I
have is two tubes coming from the floor.

Removing the sink seems easy, and closing off the drain doesn't look

that
complicated. But clearly I have to securely close off these supply
lines, and make sure the suckers don't leak. Since I can't do it at
source in the basement, I have to install some kind of valves under

the
sink to shut it all off. I've never done this or seen it done.

So before I go to the home depot and ask for advice there, what wisdom
can this group offer me?

Thanks in advance

--
Lorne Sundby



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Old September 1st 03, 06:54 PM
Mistercmk
 
Posts: n/a
Default Removing a sink


"I-zheet M'drurz" wrote in message
...
On 01 Sep 2003, Lorne wrote:

The living room has a 6-foot wide wet bar area with a sink at one end.
We've never used the faucets and sink, so we plan to remove it all
and replace the countertop to give us a usable 6-foot flat surface.

The house does not have copper pipe - all of the supply lines are grey
PVC. For this particular sink, the hot and cold supply come out of
the floor and go directly to the faucet. I don't have access to the
connection in the basement because the ceiling is finished. So what I
have is two tubes coming from the floor.

Removing the sink seems easy, and closing off the drain doesn't look
that complicated. But clearly I have to securely close off these
supply lines, and make sure the suckers don't leak. Since I can't do
it at source in the basement, I have to install some kind of valves
under the sink to shut it all off. I've never done this or seen it
done.

So before I go to the home depot and ask for advice there, what wisdom
can this group offer me?


Cut 'em and cap 'em.

Assuming you have a saw of some sort, you'll need 2 caps (buy 4,
in case you screw up, they're not removable) PVC cleaner/primer
and PVC adhesive/cement.

Turn off the main water supply valve and the one going in to your
water heater, open the faucets and drain as much water as possible
before you cut the pipes. DON'T try to cut them too close to the
floor, leave a nice long stub in case the next home owner wants
to use them again. In fact, if you screw up the next step, YOU
will have to cut some more off, so leave as much stub as you can
stand (it's going to be hidden under the sink anyway, right?)

If you have NEVER worked with PVC pipe and adhesive before, please
do some more research or get somebody to help who is experienced.
While it's a fairly simple process, there is no room for error, the
adhesive sets up QUICKLY, and if you don't get it coated properly
you will have leaks.

Cut the pipes with just about any saw (jig-, circular-, chain- g)
DRY them thoroughly, CLEAN them thoroughly, and use plenty of
adhesive to apply the caps. By all means have somebody standing
there looking for leaks as you turn the water back on. You could
use valves insted of caps, but that leaves you exposed to somebody
(kids, grandkids?) opening them by accident and sending you for
the mop (or the homeowner's insurance).

He might want to use a valve and then put a cap on the end of the valve.


  #5   Report Post  
Old September 2nd 03, 02:46 AM
Joe Bobst
 
Posts: n/a
Default Removing a sink

The house does not have copper pipe - all of the supply lines are grey PVC.


Not all plastic is PVC and gray colored PVC is more commonly found in UV
resistant electrical conduit. In other words, before cutting and capping, make
sure that your pipes are PVC, CPVC, PEX, ABS or whatever and apply the correct
cleaner and solvent cement. Materials are often identified on the pipe itself
with markings every foot or so. Look for the ID and choose the right repair
system and you should have an easy fix. Good luck.

Joe



  #6   Report Post  
Old September 2nd 03, 03:56 AM
Lorne
 
Posts: n/a
Default Removing a sink

On 01 Sep 2003, Lorne wrote:
Removing the sink seems easy, and closing off the drain doesn't look
that complicated. But clearly I have to securely close off these
supply lines, and make sure the suckers don't leak. Since I can't do
it at source in the basement, I have to install some kind of valves
under the sink to shut it all off. I've never done this or seen it
done.


And here's the rest of the story. It was a plumbing disaster worthy of
your most hearty ribbing. Home Depot guy said you don't cap it, you put
a shut off valve on it and leave the valve shut off. So I tried, without
success, to install the shutoff valve on my now hacked off supply lines.
Each time I turned the water on, it leaked like crazy. And then in what
will not be noted as my finest hour as a plumber, I further tightened one
of the lines only to have the valve fly off.

It's amazing how much water pressure there is in a residential area.

2.5 hours, $11. Failure.

I called a plumber in. He told me that the valves I had been sold would
not work attaching to a poly-B line - if I somehow managed to get them
leak-free, there's no way he's sleep well knowing they were there. Could
come off at any time. He re-cut the line correctly, attached a brass
poly-B to PAX connector, crimping both sides properly with these rings,
using a very expensive crimping tool. Then he connected a proper valve
to the PAX side, crimping again. Repeat on the other supply line.

20 minutes, $132. Success.

I feel like a putz. Take your shots - they are well deserved.
--
Lorne Sundby



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