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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks



Drill drainage holes in the bottom and make it into a planter for small
cactus. Buy a new one. Seriously. Make sure the next wok is plain metal.
Non-stick pans shouldn't be used at the high heat levels typical of wok
cooking. I don't care what the manufacturers say.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 15:29:00 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks



Drill drainage holes in the bottom and make it into a planter for small
cactus.


Or wear it as a dunce cap for shopping at walmart.

Buy a new one. Seriously. Make sure the next wok is plain metal.
Non-stick pans shouldn't be used at the high heat levels typical of wok
cooking. I don't care what the manufacturers say.


Yep.

Lou
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Doc wrote:

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


It wasn't from walmart, but I did exactly this to a large wok
that I just didn't want to throw away. I used a wire wheel on a
side grinder to remove the teflon, then sanded it lightly with
emory cloth to remove the rest and smooth everything out. I have
been using it for about 5 years like that.

The problem is that the metal is very prone to rusting, so I have
to oil it after every cleaning, and temper it like a cast iron
pan. Since I mostly use it on a fish fryer grill (although I
will use it on the stove), it has held up pretty well. It ain't
pretty by any means, but useful.

--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
Georgetown, TX
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking?


It's going to be aluminum.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Doc wrote:
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


Give the toy big box version to your kids to play with and pick up a
real wok. They aren't expensive and you don't have to wonder if it is
safe to use.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 10:39*am, "cybercat" wrote:

but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking?


It's going to be aluminum.



It's steel. Magnet test. This thing is fairly hefty, which is why I
hate just tossing it.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

cybercat wrote:
"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking?


It's going to be aluminum.


Maybe, maybe not.

I'm not really sure what substrate they use for Xylan. But whatever
it is it won't make a good Wok.

Wikipedia has a nice article on Woks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wok

The downside is to get a good quality Wok or you'll wind up wasting time
seasoning it or just not getting the results you want. I've had a lot of
cheap woks, I think it makes a lot more sense to get a decent quality
wok and take care of it. It should last a very long time.

Jeff



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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Robert Allison wrote:

The problem is that the metal is very prone to rusting, so I have
to oil it after every cleaning, and temper it like a cast iron
pan. Since I mostly use it on a fish fryer grill (although I
will use it on the stove), it has held up pretty well. It ain't
pretty by any means, but useful.


How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should be
sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your skillet) to
water.

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Find your local body shop that does soft media blasting. Have it blasted
off there.

s

"Doc" wrote in message
...
On Mar 4, 10:39 am, "cybercat" wrote:

It's steel. Magnet test. This thing is fairly hefty, which is why I
hate just tossing it.




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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


"Doc" wrote in message
...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks




Sand blasting would remove the coating pretty easily, and the rough
surface should smooth out and "season" fairly quickly with use;
especially if you use steel utensils.

Bob
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 07:21:52 -0800 (PST), Doc
wrote:

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


I found out how to remove "Teflon". Simmer tomato sauce for a couple
of days. When you toss the sauce out the Teflon goes with it :-))

The acid destroyed the Teflon.

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 9:21*am, Doc wrote:
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. *Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.

Thanks


I have a few similarly well worn pans in my kichen cubbard.
With the "more recent" (w.i. the past 20-30 years) years of cookware,
the metal base is very likely ALUMINUM, which when heated is very
toxic.
What I did and recommend is to simply continue cooking with the Xylan
surface by using THICK COATS of the non-stick spray-on cooking oils or
simply let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 2:28*pm, Charles van Blommestein wrote:
On Mar 4, 9:21*am, Doc wrote:





I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. *Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.


I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.


Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


I have a few similarly well worn pans in my kichen cubbard.
With the "more recent" (w.i. the past 20-30 years) years of cookware,
the metal base is very likely ALUMINUM, which when heated is very
toxic.
What I did and recommend is to simply continue cooking with the Xylan
surface by using THICK COATS of the non-stick spray-on cooking oils or
simply let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl

SWMBO would kill me - not because I let the dog drink out of a pan,
but because I tried to give her dog cancer.

She's convinced that any and all non-stick surface coatings are toxic.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Doc" wrote...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok.


Why bother removing it? Just use it with a little oil!




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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

John Weiss wrote:
"Doc" wrote...
I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok.


Why bother removing it? Just use it with a little oil!


Because it is not a real wok and if you try to use it at wok
temperatures the plastic coating will be ruined and will outgass toxic
stuff while doing it.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 11:37:15 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl

SWMBO would kill me - not because I let the dog drink out of a pan,
but because I tried to give her dog cancer.

She's convinced that any and all non-stick surface coatings are toxic.


Listen to her

(ever buy a pet bowl with Teflon?)

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"Oren" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 11:37:15 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl

SWMBO would kill me - not because I let the dog drink out of a pan,
but because I tried to give her dog cancer.

She's convinced that any and all non-stick surface coatings are toxic.


Listen to her

(ever buy a pet bowl with Teflon?)



Even better: In some Chinese restaurants, you can see the kitchen. Ever
seen a non-stick wok in a place like that?

Of course not.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 3:38*pm, "JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:
"Oren" wrote in message

...

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 11:37:15 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:


let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl


SWMBO would kill me - not because I let the dog drink out of a pan,
but because I tried to give her dog cancer.


She's convinced that any and all non-stick surface coatings are toxic.


Listen to her


(ever buy a pet bowl with Teflon?)


Even better: *In some Chinese restaurants, you can see the kitchen. Ever
seen a non-stick wok in a place like that?

Of course not.


Even better: In some Chinese restaurants, you can see the
kitchen. Ever seen a non-stick wok in a place like that?


Even better: Ever seen a 4 legged creature in a place like that? Of
course not - not alive anyway..
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 20:38:21 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

"Oren" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 11:37:15 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

let the 4-leg use this worn pan as a drinking bowl

SWMBO would kill me - not because I let the dog drink out of a pan,
but because I tried to give her dog cancer.

She's convinced that any and all non-stick surface coatings are toxic.


Listen to her

(ever buy a pet bowl with Teflon?)



Even better: In some Chinese restaurants, you can see the kitchen. Ever
seen a non-stick wok in a place like that?

Of course not.



A polymer coating would never survive the frequent stabbling with a
wok spatula that goes with Chinese cooking.

I am amazed so many white folks use the wok. I'd use one too except I
have an electric range. It uses up too much power to get the wok to
temperature and that heat is concentrated on the bottom only.

Only a gas range or open fire does a wok justice. Use an uncoated
heavy iron or steel wok. It holds and distributes the heat to provide
a better heat gradient from the center to the rim, sort of like why
people prefer to use a cast iron skillet to bring out the best
flavoring and texture. To clean empty the wok and add a cup of water
to heat over the range. Swirl the boiling water to dissolve the
residual food. Chinese restaurants use a stiff bamboo whisk to
unstick food morsels. Its unlikely you can use a whisk in a home as
the whisk will flick dirty water outside the sink. A few quick
swipes with a souring pad should suffice. Repeat. Rinse each time.
Wipe with a paper towel and "burn" off the remaining rinse water
adhering to the wok over the range. In an iron wok the residual heat
is often enough to vaporize that dampness.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

["Followup-To:" header set to rec.food.cooking.]

temperature and that heat is concentrated on the bottom only.


That's pretty much the ideal. Some food items can be pushed up on the sides to retard
cooking while the bottom still provides mucho heat for other food items.

Only a gas range or open fire does a wok justice.


True, but a flat bottomed wok can be used on an electric. Get a Turkey
fryer and put your wok on that burner. Those suckers are typically in the
100-170K btu range. Way more than enough to drive a wok. I got mine at
Lowes at an end-of-season sale forr $19! You can hardly get a lone burner
that cheap.

nb









Use an uncoated
heavy iron or steel wok. It holds and distributes the heat to provide
a better heat gradient from the center to the rim, sort of like why
people prefer to use a cast iron skillet to bring out the best
flavoring and texture. To clean empty the wok and add a cup of water
to heat over the range. Swirl the boiling water to dissolve the
residual food. Chinese restaurants use a stiff bamboo whisk to
unstick food morsels. Its unlikely you can use a whisk in a home as
the whisk will flick dirty water outside the sink. A few quick
swipes with a souring pad should suffice. Repeat. Rinse each time.
Wipe with a paper towel and "burn" off the remaining rinse water
adhering to the wok over the range. In an iron wok the residual heat
is often enough to vaporize that dampness.

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Mar 4, 7:21*am, Doc wrote:
[snip]
I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. [snip]


Use the former wok for some non-food-related purpose. Here's a wok
that will perform well for years, at a cost of $11.50.
https://www.surfasonline.com/products/18121.cfm

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 21:27:37 GMT, PaPaPeng wrote:

I am amazed so many white folks use the wok.


Some even speak three languages: English, Redneck and Profanity.

So! WOK off!

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?


"HeyBub" wrote in message
...
Robert Allison wrote:

The problem is that the metal is very prone to rusting, so I have
to oil it after every cleaning, and temper it like a cast iron
pan. Since I mostly use it on a fish fryer grill (although I
will use it on the stove), it has held up pretty well. It ain't
pretty by any means, but useful.


How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should be
sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your skillet) to
water.


Water is not the problem, as long as you dry it after rinsing. I set it on the
still hot burner after rinsing. I never use soap on my cast iron. I put a little
hot water in it, scrub with a brush, rinse and dry it on the burner. Then I rub
it with a little oil or butter before the next use. Soap will quickly remove the
seasoning.



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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 07:21:52 -0800 (PST), Doc
wrote:

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks


Howdy,

The drill approach would probably work, but those coatings
are very soft and there might be an easier approach:

I would just try sanding it off by hand with a few sheets of
wet or dry abrasive paper.

That said, I would have a concern:

You asked if the substrate would be suitable for cooking,
but how would one know?

If, for example, it had lead in it, you might be in some
trouble over time.

Though I certainly understand the desire to make good use
out of something you now own, I, personally, would hesitate
(unless I could figure out a way to be sure that the
material was safe for food contact use.)

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Bob F wrote:

How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should be
sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your
skillet) to water.


Water is not the problem, as long as you dry it after rinsing. I set
it on the still hot burner after rinsing. I never use soap on my cast
iron. I put a little hot water in it, scrub with a brush, rinse and
dry it on the burner. Then I rub it with a little oil or butter
before the next use. Soap will quickly remove the seasoning.


Okay, I'll play. WHY are you washing the thing in the first place?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"HeyBub" wrote in message
...
Bob F wrote:

How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should be
sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your
skillet) to water.


Water is not the problem, as long as you dry it after rinsing. I set
it on the still hot burner after rinsing. I never use soap on my cast
iron. I put a little hot water in it, scrub with a brush, rinse and
dry it on the burner. Then I rub it with a little oil or butter
before the next use. Soap will quickly remove the seasoning.


Okay, I'll play. WHY are you washing the thing in the first place?



Are you asking about washing, or cleaning?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 14:01:05 -0800, Oren wrote:

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 21:27:37 GMT, PaPaPeng wrote:

I am amazed so many white folks use the wok.


Some even speak three languages: English, Redneck and Profanity.

So! WOK off!



Spoken like a true abused kitchen slave. Wife trouble?
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 07:21:52 -0800 (PST), Doc
wrote:

I've got this wok from WalMart that's coated with Xylan, which I
gather is a first cousin of Teflon. Big mistake. It's non-stick
properties aren't very good.

I don't like the idea of simply throwing it out and dumping more money
into a non-coated wok. I'm sure I could strip the coating off with one
of these fibrous abrasive wheels that you bolt onto a hand drill -
wearing a dust mask of course - but is the surface that's exposed
going to be suitable for cooking? Wondering if there's some pre-
treating that's done to the metal that might render it toxic if used
as a cooking surface.

Further, should it be possible to thoroughly remove all the coating
abrasively like that? Obviously I don't want to leave behind small
particles since I assume it's toxic.


Thanks



Sell it, give it away, etc. Get yourself a nice heavy wok with sturdy
handles. You'll find better quality at a kitchen or specialty store,
and it will be the last wok you buy. Always prep a wok with a
high-temperature cooking oil before adding the food. Peanut oil is a
good choice. Woks work better with natural gas stoves.
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 23:16:02 GMT, PaPaPeng wrote:

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 14:01:05 -0800, Oren wrote:

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 21:27:37 GMT, PaPaPeng wrote:

I am amazed so many white folks use the wok.


Some even speak three languages: English, Redneck and Profanity.

So! WOK off!



Spoken like a true abused kitchen slave. Wife trouble?


Not when I cook in the yard, declare my turf and so. I'm going to
China town in Las Vegas and get me a wok. Might have the bride drive
me.

Nice try!


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

In article ,
"HeyBub" wrote:

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding, sorry,
I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean wooden salad
bowls.

jt
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 02:56:06 GMT, jt august
wrote:

In article ,
"HeyBub" wrote:

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding, sorry,
I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean wooden salad
bowls.

jt


Howdy,

In my experience, wooden salad bowls can indeed be washed,
but it would be unwise to soak them for any length of time.

I'd suggest a quick rinse with a bit of dish soap, and then
a quick pat dry...

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

Peter A wrote:

How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should
be sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your
skillet) to water.


Water is not the problem, as long as you dry it after rinsing. I set
it on the still hot burner after rinsing. I never use soap on my
cast iron. I put a little hot water in it, scrub with a brush, rinse
and dry it on the burner. Then I rub it with a little oil or butter
before the next use. Soap will quickly remove the seasoning.



I have 2 cast iron pans each about a decade old. They have great
seasoning, and I regularly clean them with a weak detergent solution
and a soft brush.


Why?


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

jt august wrote:
In article ,
"HeyBub" wrote:

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding,
sorry, I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean
wooden salad bowls.


You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and spices
from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique palette of flavors
and aromas.

If you're not into adventures in sublime delights for the nuanced nose, use
styrofoam.


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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

"HeyBub" wrote in message
...
jt august wrote:
In article ,
"HeyBub" wrote:

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding,
sorry, I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean
wooden salad bowls.


You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and spices
from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique palette of flavors
and aromas.

If you're not into adventures in sublime delights for the nuanced nose,
use styrofoam.



As usual, you are a complete idiot.




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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

jt august wrote:
In article ,
"HeyBub" wrote:

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
bowls? Put them in the fireplace and season them? Just kidding, sorry,
I couldn't resist. But I am honestly curious how to clean wooden salad
bowls.

jt

Sandpaper?

(Well, somebody had to say it...)

But seriously, yeah, you can wash wood- you just don't wanna SOAK it.
Get the semi-soft brush wet and soapy, run the bowl under the sink,
scrub briefly with the brush, rinse, and put in drainer upside down. Not
a big deal, if it is made of the right naturally-oily wood, or has been
treated with food-grade oil. I have an old laminated-wood cutting board
that I have been washing for 20 years, and it is only now starting to
fall apart.

aem sends...

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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

In article ,
PaPaPeng wrote:

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 14:01:05 -0800, Oren wrote:

On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 21:27:37 GMT, PaPaPeng wrote:

I am amazed so many white folks use the wok.


Some even speak three languages: English, Redneck and Profanity.

So! WOK off!



Spoken like a true abused kitchen slave. Wife trouble?


"My wife's cooking is so bad (how bad is it?), the flies have all
chipped in to buy us a screen door!"
--Rodney Dangerfield
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and
spices from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique
palette of flavors and aromas.

If you're not into adventures in sublime delights for the nuanced
nose, use styrofoam.



As usual, you are a complete idiot.


No, I am a gourmet.

It is admittedly sometimes difficult, surrounded as I am by Philistines who
find picking hair out of their weevil-flavored rice balls the epitome of
culinary accomplishments.

For those whose sensibilites are not as finely honed, the whole issue can
easily be resolved by choosing salad bowls made of Aluminum, preferably with
a pop-top to match the other china and utensils.

You can't go wrong watching Martha Stewart.


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Default "HeyBub" sniffs soiled undies was Removing non-stick

HeySchlub wrote:
jt august wrote:
"HeySchlub" wrote:


Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


How, then, does one get salad dressing and other residues off salad
bowls? �Put them in the fireplace and season them? �Just kidding,
sorry, I couldn't resist. �But I am honestly curious how to clean
wooden salad bowls.


You don't get the dressings out. Just wipe the bowls. The oils and spices
from prior uses flavor subsequent salads with a unique palette of flavors
and aromas.



Yes, the lovely stench of rancidity... if you want your salad bowl to
stink you must be another one of those fetid dago slobs.

HeyBub has a soiled undies sniffing fetish.

If one insists on wooden salad bowls they'd best learn how they're
properly sealed and accept adhering to a regimen of high maintenence.
Products for protecting wooden kitchen implements are readily
available, essentially a paste of beeswax and mineral oil. A properly
maintained wooden salad bowl should harbor no odor whatsoever.
Anytime a restaurant serves my salad in a wooden bowl I send it back,
I'm not really interested in experiencing the scent glands of the
prior patrons.

Hey Schlub, get your stinky butt outta here, you filthy cross posting
douchebag.

SHELDON
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Default Removing non-stick coating to salvage a pan?

HeyBub wrote:

Robert Allison wrote:

The problem is that the metal is very prone to rusting, so I have
to oil it after every cleaning, and temper it like a cast iron
pan. Since I mostly use it on a fish fryer grill (although I
will use it on the stove), it has held up pretty well. It ain't
pretty by any means, but useful.



How are you "cleaning" it? Wiping it out with a paper towel should be
sufficient. Do not ever subject an iron utensil (or maybe your skillet) to
water.

Don't wash wooden salad bowls either.


I use a combination of methods to clean it. Usually by pouring
some water in it when it is hot and letting it boil for a minute
or so, then wiping it out and oiling it. When it has been in the
cabinet for a while, I take a paper towel and wipe out the rust
and then oil it, but sometimes the rust is too bad, so I have to
use an SOS pad and some water, then oil, then seasoning.

Being as this is not a standard wok, but one that has had the
teflon removed, it is way more prone to rusting than a standard
(real) wok. For example, I can season it, oil it and put it in
the cabinet. After 2or 3 weeks, it will be rusted (high humidity
here).

That is why I warned the OP about it. My other woks do not do
this, but none of them are as big as this one.

--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
Georgetown, TX
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