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bugs bunny
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life of
things?


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tom
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

Only one way to find out for sure. Tom

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Tony Hwang
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

bugs bunny wrote:
how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life of
things?


Hi,
I set my regulator at 60 psi.
Tony
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buffalobill
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

you have so much pressure you could enjoy a multiple showerhead shower,
go take a walk thru the plumbing department at some of the new add-ons.
part of your decision may want outdoor garden hose pressure high for
outside cleanup and carwashing, but generally you'll settle into
something that keeps you happy in the shower and refills toilets
quickly without splashing up the sinks. you may consider drips in the
system more likely to occur at fixtures and plumbing valves and
connections throughout the house
plus any input specifications for your water using devices. monitor
your water meter for leaks in your system more closely.

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Joseph Meehan
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

bugs bunny wrote:
how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing
machine, etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so
I can set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the
life of things?


Most sources recommend between 40 and 60 psi.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit




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TAB Dude
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

80psi is the max one would want if on a municiple water system and that is
high. If on a well system 60 psi is on the high side and higher will wear
our your well pump and controls.

TAB Dude


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Doug Kanter
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?


"bugs bunny" wrote in message
. ..
how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life
of things?


I've always heard 50-60 psi. But, my previous home had no regulator, and the
pressure was measured at 100-ish. In 20 years, the worst problem we had was
noisy pipes when the kitchen sink was turned on. No premature wear that I
was aware of, unless having the rebuild the Delta kitchen faucet twice ($10,
20 minutes), was caused by high pressure.


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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

Appliances are generally rated up to 80. I certainly wouldn't go above
this unless you have a really good reason to do so.

As others have noted 40-60 is typical.

I read somewhere that the single biggest cause of home flooding is
washing machine hose failure. Pressure is a big contributor here.

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Beachcomber
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?



I've always heard 50-60 psi. But, my previous home had no regulator, and the
pressure was measured at 100-ish. In 20 years, the worst problem we had was
noisy pipes when the kitchen sink was turned on. No premature wear that I
was aware of, unless having the rebuild the Delta kitchen faucet twice ($10,
20 minutes), was caused by high pressure.



For most homes, it is not just a matter of setting the regulator to
get the pressure you want. The size of the pipes and their various
branches is a key factor.

Even if you have your regulator maxed out, the shower is not going to
be vary powerful if it's plumbed with 1/2 " pipe or is located a long
distance from the house inlet.

Beachcomber

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Doug Kanter
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?


"Beachcomber" wrote in message
...


I've always heard 50-60 psi. But, my previous home had no regulator, and
the
pressure was measured at 100-ish. In 20 years, the worst problem we had
was
noisy pipes when the kitchen sink was turned on. No premature wear that I
was aware of, unless having the rebuild the Delta kitchen faucet twice
($10,
20 minutes), was caused by high pressure.



For most homes, it is not just a matter of setting the regulator to
get the pressure you want. The size of the pipes and their various
branches is a key factor.

Even if you have your regulator maxed out, the shower is not going to
be vary powerful if it's plumbed with 1/2 " pipe or is located a long
distance from the house inlet.

Beachcomber


Agreed. And, we didn't set up the house that way. Be bought it when we were
young and clueless. I didn't even know regulators existed until I moved to
the 2nd house and found one there.




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Tom
 
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wrote in message
ups.com...
Appliances are generally rated up to 80. I certainly wouldn't go above
this unless you have a really good reason to do so.

As others have noted 40-60 is typical.

I read somewhere that the single biggest cause of home flooding is
washing machine hose failure. Pressure is a big contributor here.

I agree...sold washers for 15 years and as I remember the user's manuals
recommend no more than 60 lbs pressure as a continuous pressure. Any higher
invites the mixing solenoids to fail and open, flooding the house. And of
course the higher pressure shortens the life of hoses, also. I lived in AZ
for a while and one house there had pressure of 90 lbs. After the copper
pipes burst under the slab twice in two years, I added a regulator and set
it to 60 lbs. Two of my neighbors had also had problems with a leak under
the slab. I didn't notice much loss of pressure at the shower head which was
on the other side of the house from the incoming line.
Tom G


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Bubba
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 00:32:24 -0500, "bugs bunny"
wrote:

how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life of
things?


Well silly, 149psi of course.
Bubba
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Stretch
 
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Most water heater pressure relief valves pop at 150PSI. I used to live
in PA with water pressure of 125 PSI. I installed a pressure reducing
valve set for 60 PSI. It reduced the flow rate of my shower head
considerably, so I used less hot water, which reduced my gas bill some.
I still got a good shower.

Stretch

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evodawg
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

bugs bunny wrote:

how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life
of things?


If you go to high you take the chance of blowing out your copper sweat pipe
joints. Think of the cost of replacing copper joints in a wall somewhere.
Not to mention the water damage caused by a break.

Rich
--
"you can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"


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Goedjn
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 00:32:24 -0500, "bugs bunny"
wrote:

how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life of
things?


What's the pressure setting on your water-heater T&P valve?

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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?


"evodawg" wrote in message
If you go to high you take the chance of blowing out your copper sweat
pipe
joints. Think of the cost of replacing copper joints in a wall somewhere.
Not to mention the water damage caused by a break.


Have you ever checked the pressure a proper sweated joint can take? Far
beyond the 100 psi or so you'd find in any water system.


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evodawg
 
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Default how high is too high for residential water pressure?

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:


"evodawg" wrote in message
If you go to high you take the chance of blowing out your copper sweat
pipe
joints. Think of the cost of replacing copper joints in a wall somewhere.
Not to mention the water damage caused by a break.


Have you ever checked the pressure a proper sweated joint can take? Far
beyond the 100 psi or so you'd find in any water system.


Yes but who said it was properly seated? You? Whenever you change pressure
there is no guarantee. Would you stake your reputation on it or your
insurance? I have seen this happen more than once. It's not a pretty sight.
Rich
--
"you can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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I'd go thru the expense of having the house supply pipe increased in
size. You probably have a 1 inch now. Have it increaded to a 4" or
even a 6". Then get a quality pressure booster and increase the
pressure to around 2000 lbs (one ton per square inch). Then run 2"
galvanized pipe to your shower. You'll be in for a treat.

PS. when you first turn on the pressure booster, watch any old copper
pipes. They may blow up like a balloon as the pressure rises. When
they do, be sure to shut down the water and replace these pipes. The
other thing to watch are cheap faucets. They could blow right off the
sink, puncture the ceiling and blast a hole thru the roof.
Additionally, they may land as far as 5 miles away. so you may never
see them again.
Finally, when you flush the toilet, be sure to put on a raincoat, and
shut off any bathroom fans. We all know what happens when the ****
hits the fan.....

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INSERT SOMETHING HERE
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On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 00:32:24 -0500, "bugs bunny"
wrote:

how high can I run my home water pressure before I run the risk of
prematurely wearing out fixtures, washers, toilet parts, washing machine,
etc.

our city water supply is at a really high pressure (over 150 psi) so I can
set the pressure regulator for any pressure less than that

I like really strong showers, how high can I go without reducing the life of
things?




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