Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old November 21st 16, 06:54 PM
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On Monday, October 10, 2016 at 11:06:50 AM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:

Torque is proportional to current, no?

Yep. But a DC motor dead-stopped is a short circuit. And even a very nearly crapped-out battery may have enough to blow a fuse if dead-shorted. Fuse action is not voltage dependent (as long as the fuse is rated at a higher voltage than the application).

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
Hi...i am a new user here. As per my knowledge the bad batteries caused the electronic controller to draw too much current in an attempt to maintain speed.That's just a guess, though. It is hard disagnose something with no information.

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Last edited by AlfySande : July 4th 17 at 03:44 PM

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Old November 21st 16, 08:10 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Batteries

On Monday, November 21, 2016 at 2:17:10 PM UTC-5, AlfySande wrote:

Hi...i am a new user here. As per my knowledge the bad batteries caused
the electronic controller to draw too much current in an attempt to
maintain speed.That's just a guess, though. It is hard disagnose
something with no information.



I think you left out a step:

a) The batteries ran low.
b) The user kept 'upping' control to maintain speed.
c) As long as the motor is turning, things are (mostly) OK.
d) The motor (brush-type) stops dead, but the speed control is still on MAX.
e) Now the full - remaining - battery capacity is going through the fuse.
f) *POOF*

But, the batteries are sulphated, the speed controller has been overheated, the motor overheated - or at least those commutator contacts arced. Altogether a mess.

Any properly designed system would have a condition meter and a low-battery cut-off to prevent this. And a thermal breaker in addition to the fuse.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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Old November 23rd 16, 04:03 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Batteries

What fuse is a good question.

Is there a possibility that the "wrong battery type" was put in the buggy? i.e. a battery that does not like deep discharge replaced for one that would. A "car battery" pretty much would die quickly if it discharged too far.

A defect with the charger is another possibility. Loose connections can kill the electronics responsible for charging.


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