A DIY & home improvement forum. DIYbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » DIYbanter forum » Do - it - Yourself » UK diy
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Aldi LED lamps



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old March 27th 14, 09:20 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 505
Default Aldi LED lamps



NT


I always thought that the circular fluorescent tubes had potential - but
the fittings were always horrible.
Perhaps a flat spiral tube would be a good way of getting additional
lengthe whilst aiming the light downwards.
Ads
  #12  
Old March 27th 14, 09:57 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,811
Default Aldi LED lamps

On 27/03/2014 08:45, wrote:
On Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:54:18 AM UTC, Johny B Good wrote:


One thing I do know for a fact is that the mercury amalgam lamp is
less efficient than the straight mercury vapour lamp when each is run
at their optimum temperature. I'd overlooked the short tube effect on
efficacy so there's even less reason to disbelieve that a modern
linear tube and electronic fitting is the most efficient of all the
GLS lighting technologies to date.


Given further development of the LED lamp, notably more efficient
mass production as demand starts to increase to scale up mass
production to more economic levels, the price of such lamps will fall
to a level comparable to the equivilent of the 5 or 6 CFL lamps it
replaces. The efficiency needn't have to match or exceed a modern CFL
to succeed as a replacement since there are other benefits than just
the bare watts to lumens ratio involved in the TCO equation.
At the moment, most LED lamps are around 4 to 4 1/2 times more
efficient than a tungsten filament GLS lamp compared to a CFL's
efficiency figure of 5 times. An LED lamp isn't so far behind the CFL
and may yet match or even just exceed the efficiency of the CFL in the
not too distant future.


Folk have been saying that for decades, but it still hasnt happened. At some point it may, but not soon. CFL will continue to rule for years for GLS equivalents.


No they haven't been saying it for decades. High power LEDs are a
comparatively recent innovation they were indicator lamps originally.
CFL is essentially about to be phased out as LEDs have now won.

The latest consumer LED lamps are around 80lm/W for 8-10W bulbs which is
about comparable with fluorescents and *better* than most CFLs. There
are already 10W LEDs in production which at 100lm/W Cree XM-L would
trounce any fluorescent lamp.

Research grade white LEDs can now reach 250lm/W or more but their price
is still astronomical see for example Cree's recent announcement.

http://www.cree.com/News-and-Events/...00-LPW-fixture

This really is impressive because only the low pressure sodium vapour
lamp and the microwave pumped sulphur lamp are in that league.

As things stand, it's not the slightly lower efficacy compared to CFL
that's holding back the uptake of LED. It's the high price on GLS
lamps with barely adequate ratings that's the big turn off.


purchase price, premature failures, poor CCT & CRI, and inadequate power ratings. In short they're a bit of a niche product still.


The Philips and Samsung white LEDs do a pretty good imitation of
incandescent 3300K colour temperature. However, some of the cheap and
nasty LEDs have bad colour fringes and also cook their electronics.

The biggest problem for LED retrofit is getting the waste heat away from
the bulb since it all ends up as temperature rise with very little being
radiated away (and they die rather quickly at 100C or above).

The big problem for getting people to buy them is that people only see
the shelf price and forget about the true total cost of ownership
including the electricity used and replacement bulbs.

Same happens with loss leader sales of printers and mobile phones where
it is using of the "free/cheap" device that really costs the big money.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #13  
Old March 27th 14, 10:10 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,648
Default Aldi LED lamps

On Thursday, March 27, 2014 9:57:28 AM UTC, Martin Brown wrote:
On 27/03/2014 08:45, wrote:
On Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:54:18 AM UTC, Johny B Good wrote:


One thing I do know for a fact is that the mercury amalgam lamp is
less efficient than the straight mercury vapour lamp when each is run
at their optimum temperature. I'd overlooked the short tube effect on
efficacy so there's even less reason to disbelieve that a modern
linear tube and electronic fitting is the most efficient of all the
GLS lighting technologies to date.
Given further development of the LED lamp, notably more efficient
mass production as demand starts to increase to scale up mass
production to more economic levels, the price of such lamps will fall
to a level comparable to the equivilent of the 5 or 6 CFL lamps it
replaces. The efficiency needn't have to match or exceed a modern CFL
to succeed as a replacement since there are other benefits than just
the bare watts to lumens ratio involved in the TCO equation.
At the moment, most LED lamps are around 4 to 4 1/2 times more
efficient than a tungsten filament GLS lamp compared to a CFL's
efficiency figure of 5 times. An LED lamp isn't so far behind the CFL
and may yet match or even just exceed the efficiency of the CFL in the
not too distant future.


Folk have been saying that for decades, but it still hasnt happened. At some point it may, but not soon. CFL will continue to rule for years for GLS equivalents.


No they haven't been saying it for decades.


In the 70s once indicator LEDs appeared, it was fashiobnable to think the future of lighting lay with flat wall light panels lit by solid state LED lamps. People saw the future fairly well even then. Since lighting LEDs came along, there have always been people saying practical LED lighting is just around the corner.

High power LEDs are a
comparatively recent innovation they were indicator lamps originally.
CFL is essentially about to be phased out as LEDs have now won.


funny

The latest consumer LED lamps are around 80lm/W for 8-10W bulbs which is
about comparable with fluorescents and *better* than most CFLs. There
are already 10W LEDs in production which at 100lm/W Cree XM-L would
trounce any fluorescent lamp.
Research grade white LEDs can now reach 250lm/W or more but their price
is still astronomical see for example Cree's recent announcement.
http://www.cree.com/News-and-Events/...00-LPW-fixture
This really is impressive because only the low pressure sodium vapour
lamp and the microwave pumped sulphur lamp are in that league.


there have been interesting research LEDs for years.

As things stand, it's not the slightly lower efficacy compared to CFL
that's holding back the uptake of LED. It's the high price on GLS
lamps with barely adequate ratings that's the big turn off.


purchase price, premature failures, poor CCT & CRI, and inadequate power ratings. In short they're a bit of a niche product still.


The Philips and Samsung white LEDs do a pretty good imitation of
incandescent 3300K colour temperature. However, some of the cheap and


incandescents arent 3300K

nasty LEDs have bad colour fringes and also cook their electronics.
The biggest problem for LED retrofit is getting the waste heat away from
the bulb since it all ends up as temperature rise with very little being
radiated away (and they die rather quickly at 100C or above).
The big problem for getting people to buy them is that people only see
the shelf price and forget about the true total cost of ownership
including the electricity used and replacement bulbs.


well, LEDs have bigger problems than that at this point

Same happens with loss leader sales of printers and mobile phones where
it is using of the "free/cheap" device that really costs the big money.


LEDs arent sold as loss leaders AFAIK.


NT
  #14  
Old March 27th 14, 10:35 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 912
Default Aldi LED lamps

About the same as the Low energy ones were when they first appeared.
Brian

--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
wrote in message
...
Aldi have a range of led lamps in their current specials. What caught my eye
was a ES rated at 1050lm, staing 75W equivalent. Also a BC 850lm. Plenty of
dimmer ones too. These are the first usefully bright ones I've found. Will
try them out later and report back.

10 each, which isn't cheap though.

Andrew


  #15  
Old March 27th 14, 11:12 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,926
Default Aldi LED lamps

In article , Martin Brown |||newspam|||
@nezumi.demon.co.uk writes

This really is impressive because only the low pressure sodium vapour
lamp and the microwave pumped sulphur lamp are in that league.


I recently was in a shopping mall lit by (I think) metal halide lamps
(big white bulb, probably E40 cap).

Some of those fittings had been retrofitted with large spiral CFLs and I
was impressed with their brightness and colour rendition. They were so
bright it was difficult to look at them directly.

http://www.energynowinc.com/cms/?q=S...n_Replacements

This seems to me to be a suitable case for using CFL rather than LED as
a replacement.

--
(\_/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
  #16  
Old March 27th 14, 01:04 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 277
Default Aldi LED lamps

On 27/03/2014 09:57, Martin Brown wrote:



The latest consumer LED lamps are around 80lm/W for 8-10W bulbs which is
about comparable with fluorescents and *better* than most CFLs. There
are already 10W LEDs in production which at 100lm/W Cree XM-L would
trounce any fluorescent lamp.


Yes the latest LED bulbs that I have bought are more efficient than
CFLs. The BC22 bulbs I have bought from Amazon were cheaper than the
Aldi ones mentioned by the O/P.


--
Michael Chare
  #17  
Old March 27th 14, 02:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,854
Default Aldi LED lamps

On Thu, 27 Mar 2014 08:13:13 +0000, Martin Brown wrote:

A helpful IkeaDroid said she'd mention a suggestion of stocking adaptors (I
emphasised good quality, minimal extra lenght and clearance for 'shoulder'
and also said that there was talk of adaptors being possible anyway.

I don't much like adaptors in permanent light fittings.


I feel the same but I still have a shedload of 10p CFLs and they'ree good
ones. Can't yet justify going to ES wired sockets, although easy to do,
especially as LEDs are still expensive and grossly inefficient.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
  #18  
Old March 27th 14, 04:15 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Aldi LED lamps

On Wednesday, March 26, 2014 12:27:22 PM UTC, wrote:
Aldi have a range of led lamps in their current specials. What caught my eye was a ES rated at 1050lm, staing 75W equivalent. Also a BC 850lm. Plenty of dimmer ones too. These are the first usefully bright ones I've found. Will try them out later and report back.

Ok, it's bright, the 1050lm one. Possibly a little too bright for the application I wanted it for: an uplighting standard lamp. Colour temp is very warm, 2700K.

The lamps are completely unbranded, just say "made in china" dot printed on the side. They're also jolly heavy compred to an old tfl or one of my 23W Megaman spiral clfs.

Stated life is 25k hours.
  #20  
Old March 27th 14, 05:58 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 785
Default Aldi LED lamps

On Thu, 27 Mar 2014 01:45:28 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:54:18 AM UTC, Johny B Good wrote:
On Wed, 26 Mar 2014 15:08:06 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:
On Wednesday, March 26, 2014 5:01:00 PM UTC, Johny B Good wrote:
On Wed, 26 Mar 2014 15:14:08 +0000, Timothy Murphy wrote:
Martin Brown wrote:


I was a bit surprised to see when I visited IKEA recently
that the LED "candle bulbs" were slightly less efficient,
in lumens per watt, that the more standard energy-saving bulbs.

That's typical. What you're paying for (assuming enough lumens) is
the 50,000 hour life rating and 'instant on' feature.
The best lighting in terms of cost per lumen output still remains the
linear fluorescent tube in an electronically ballasted fitting.
The CFL can't compete simply on account that its much higher tube
temperature demands the use of the slightly less efficient mercury
amalgam fill (the reason why they suffer a 'run up to temperature'
delay in reaching their design lumens brightness).

I thought short tube length was the main cause of lower efficacy.

That's certainly a contributary factor (possibly the main factor) but
it's surprising just how long the coiled tube turns out to be in a
modern 11W CFL. I've just checked one and I reckon they've packed a
good 14 to 15 inches worth of tube, not counting the hidden ends, into
the double helix.
Without hunting down a 20W example to measure, I reckon the effective
tube length could be approaching the 20 to 24 inch mark, significantly
longer than the classic 6 and 8 inch linear tubes where the short
length is a major factor in reduced efficacy.


14-15" makes for rather poorer efficacy than 5' & 8' tubes. There's just no way round that with fluorescents.

One thing I do know for a fact is that the mercury amalgam lamp is
less efficient than the straight mercury vapour lamp when each is run
at their optimum temperature. I'd overlooked the short tube effect on
efficacy so there's even less reason to disbelieve that a modern
linear tube and electronic fitting is the most efficient of all the
GLS lighting technologies to date.
Given further development of the LED lamp, notably more efficient
mass production as demand starts to increase to scale up mass
production to more economic levels, the price of such lamps will fall
to a level comparable to the equivilent of the 5 or 6 CFL lamps it
replaces. The efficiency needn't have to match or exceed a modern CFL
to succeed as a replacement since there are other benefits than just
the bare watts to lumens ratio involved in the TCO equation.
At the moment, most LED lamps are around 4 to 4 1/2 times more
efficient than a tungsten filament GLS lamp compared to a CFL's
efficiency figure of 5 times. An LED lamp isn't so far behind the CFL
and may yet match or even just exceed the efficiency of the CFL in the
not too distant future.


Folk have been saying that for decades, but it still hasnt happened. At some point it may, but not soon. CFL will continue to rule for years for GLS equivalents.


As things stand, it's not the slightly lower efficacy compared to CFL
that's holding back the uptake of LED. It's the high price on GLS
lamps with barely adequate ratings that's the big turn off.


purchase price, premature failures, poor CCT & CRI, and inadequate power ratings. In short they're a bit of a niche product still.


That rather neatly sums it up. Mentioning the phrase "niche product"
reminds me that I found one for a 5 watt LED lamp I bought in Asda for
a fiver about a year ago. The niche in question being the foot of the
basement steps where the area being lit is quite small and the cool
temperature reduces thermal stress on the lamp (it's plugged into a
ceiling mounted batten socket).

The half second or so delay between switch on and instant brightness
is a welcome change from the 11W CFL previously residing in the
socket.

I'd bought it because it was cheaper than the 3.5 and 4 watt
alternatives next to it on the shelf and thought it was 'worth a
punt'. I first tried it out as a replacement to the 11W double helix
CFL in the bedroom wall light fixture over the bed head.

The glass tulip shade wasn't ventillated and I rather thought this
was detrimental to the lamp so I then transplanted it to a desk lamp
where it seemed to be adequate and in no danger of overheating. Even
here, I decided that another 11W CFL would be a better match before
finally discovering its ultimate niche.

I saw those 10W LEDs in Aldi last Sunday and wasn't impressed at the
1 penny shy of ten quid price tag and, for all the reasons you gave
which so neatly sums it all up, decided against making a purchase. I
might have been tempted if it had been more sensibly priced (imo, a
fiver would have been enough temptation).
--
Regards, J B Good
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LED lamps D.M. Procida UK diy 41 October 26th 12 11:53 AM
(S)ES lamps Fred UK diy 21 March 12th 12 08:32 AM
2D Lamps The Medway Handyman[_2_] UK diy 7 February 14th 10 11:58 PM
Low-cost, low wattage, energy-saving lamps at Aldi soon Jim Gregory UK diy 10 February 7th 06 12:15 AM
O.T. Making clear lamps into amber lamps NokNokMan Metalworking 14 October 12th 05 05:46 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2004-2014 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.